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post #46 of 76
I agree-specifically in regards to the HD 800s-all components are very essentiall-weakest link and whatnot. I agree that the Senn isn't necessarily difficult to drive, but is very fussy about amping. It often reminds me of the K702 in that regard. The Senn is so polarizing though because it is difficult to get them 'right' because they absolutely reveal flaws in the recording and also the chain. Some people are content with what they hear, and some aren't-easy enough. But it isn't fair to say they won't continually improve with better and better equipment, given their ultra-revelatory nature.

I'm already thinking about jumping up to the EC Kraken/beheMOTH/Leviathan just to see what potential improvements if any can be had over my ZDSE. Not too suggest I'm not ridiculously elated by my current rig- I AM-but rather because I firmly believe the Senn can still give more. Guess I'll find out one way or another, rather than hating on those who have the balls to try. More power to me. wink.gif

-Daniel
post #47 of 76

HeadFi is a useful instrument to gain valuable knowledge about all things headphone related and if this goes hand in hand with a personal experience/path/journey,the better.

Like going to school and also doing your homework resulting in knowledge.

Some will never get there!very_evil_smiley.gif


Edited by silversurfer616 - 3/10/13 at 12:57am
post #48 of 76
Hear hear. There's plenty of scope for both schools of thought here. Ooe school is saying spend 1000s to make yr hd800 sound better with no proof.
Another is sayiing yr hd800 is great with everything just go and enjoy the music, and offers some evidence to support.
I thought my stuff made my hd800 sing . Until I started researching and started setting up simple tests. My conclusions shocked me. All I'm saying is see for yourselves.
The worst can happen is you get more money in yr pocket and you see how content you can be with yr setups
post #49 of 76

Well, someone should send me an HD800, so I can test it with my various budget-fi gears. Any volunteers? atsmile.gif

post #50 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takeanidea View Post

Hear hear. There's plenty of scope for both schools of thought here. Ooe school is saying spend 1000s to make yr hd800 sound better with no proof.
Another is sayiing yr hd800 is great with everything just go and enjoy the music, and offers some evidence to support.
I thought my stuff made my hd800 sing . Until I started researching and started setting up simple tests. My conclusions shocked me. All I'm saying is see for yourselves.
The worst can happen is you get more money in yr pocket and you see how content you can be with yr setups

Nice spin.
post #51 of 76

Just to add on top, sometimes it isn't about just driving your headphones with the most power headamp out there. It is entirely possible to have an $500 amp sound great over a $1000 one, what comes to mind is synergy, think of it as the perfect couple. The HD800's are not hard to drive, power wise, but they are sure are finicky and picky when it comes to amplification, you need to mate them with the perfect companion amp, this is where "it's best to audition before you buy" comes into play. 

post #52 of 76

The HD800 are actually very hard to drive, quite possibly the most difficult dynamic headphones in current production.  It's all down to the quirks of the ring radiator and the rather large difference is impedance over the frequency range.   The 300ohm figure is meaningless to be honest and it takes a very well designed amp to make them behave. 

post #53 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by spritzer View Post

The HD800 are actually very hard to drive, quite possibly the most difficult dynamic headphones in current production.  It's all down to the quirks of the ring radiator and the rather large difference is impedance over the frequency range.   The 300ohm figure is meaningless to be honest and it takes a very well designed amp to make them behave. 

+1
post #54 of 76

Amp upgrades are a lot less noticeable than headphone upgrades, because it is still the same sound signature, and often it takes a while to actually discern the differences between the amps or unamped. 

post #55 of 76
Thread Starter 

HD800 has crystal clear trebles and solid highs, but it lacks airiness that the SE535 proudly posses. I overly enjoy these cans, but they sounded "too conservative" in order words, they produce sound without having it retouched or photo-shopped. I for one is a sucker for retouches, it makes everything looked & sounded appealing. The 535s is kinda like that, its coloration is not overly done but with just the right amount of spice to make it zest! HD800 and other IEMs are like plain old oatmeal. You need to add flavors and ingredients to make the healthy bowl of oatmeal delicious! I notice when I put on my 535s, I find myself listening to the same tunes over and over, but with the HD800, I found myself having to skip tracks after tracks to make it go faster. Maybe it's the clamping on my face that makes the flush, so I constantly have to take them off to wipe the sweat off my cheeks!

 

that's my two cents of the day with HD800

 

Finally I have to say Grado PS1000 sounds superior than HD800!


Edited by kfki - 3/10/13 at 6:35am
post #56 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

Amp upgrades are a lot less noticeable than headphone upgrades, because it is still the same sound signature, and often it takes a while to actually discern the differences between the amps or unamped. 

 



I actually wouldn't recommend amps to upgrade sound quality, personally I believe the extra rigs may ruined what the companies originally intended you to hear. Picture this, you bought an expensive painting, then you decided to do some alteration to it, then the painting wouldn't be the one you purchased. Like I say I'm a huge fan of the Shure signature sound, if I decided to rig up my gear, the Shure experience will disappear, then what's the purpose for owning a pair of Shure if you intended to alter them. I believe custom made IEM is much suitable with an amp, because you're the ones tweaking them to suit your needs.

 

Amps and upgrade cables are just myths that they can take your music to the next level, no they don't, they dampened your sound signature. This is what I believe an upgrade cable and an amp should do, they should retain the sound signature but heighten up it just a little

in a very subtle fashion. But don't alter the sound signature!


Edited by kfki - 3/10/13 at 6:55am
post #57 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by kfki View Post

 



I actually wouldn't recommend amps to upgrade sound quality, personally I believe the extra rigs may ruined what the companies originally intended you to hear. Picture this, you bought an expensive painting, then you decided to do some alteration to it, then the painting wouldn't be the one you purchased. Like I say I'm a huge fan of the Shure signature sound, if I decided to rig up my gear, the Shure experience will disappear, then what's the purpose for owning a pair of Shure if you intended to alter them. I believe custom made IEM is much suitable with an amp, because you're the ones tweaking them to suit your needs.

 

Amps and upgrade cables are just myths that they can take your music to the next level, no they don't, they dampened your sound signature. This is what I believe an upgrade cable and an amp should do, they should retain the sound signature but heighten up it just a little

in a very subtle fashion. But don't alter the sound signature!

good amps should be transparent and normally improve soundstage,imaging,seperation. but they should not change the sound signature.
IEM's don't normally need amps since they are so tiny.
But regardless a good dac should do better than an ipod.
 

Kinda like having semi frosted glass over your computer screen vs optical glass.


Edited by streetdragon - 3/10/13 at 7:05am
post #58 of 76
Thread Starter 

I guess without altering the sound signature would be using a good music player that is cost as much as your IEM. For example, iRiver AK100 would be a good consideration to pair up with high end IEM. Don't underestimate cost from it, it's 700 bucks! it got two MicroSD slots! You can manipulate the Equalization with the swipe of your finger tip! Pretty neat feature! The latest update firm 1.34 enables AAC playback!

I might get one when the price is right, but now at the moment I'm indulging my SE535s that pretty much can turn any average joe music player into beefier jock!
 

post #59 of 76
Ipods have a flat frequency response. Using the line out dock cable costing £3 into any one of my headphone amps the sound going into my hd800s is breathtakingly good
post #60 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Takeanidea View Post

Ipods have a flat frequency response. Using the line out dock cable costing £3 into any one of my headphone amps the sound going into my hd800s is breathtakingly good

And here it goes... rolleyes.gif

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