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Yamaha HPH-Pro 500 Review - Page 2

post #16 of 81

I'd really like to know the difference between these and the yamaha 400's. The specs are the same according to the yamaha website.

post #17 of 81

As far as appearances go the 400 has plastic ear cups while the 500 has aluminum. The 500 also allows the cable to be plugged into either ear cup while the 400 can only do left.

post #18 of 81

Don't know if that would really be worth the extra hundred. I have the eph-100 iem's and absolutely love the sound. Am considering these or the sennheiser momentum for a change of pace without having something shoved in my ears.

post #19 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruin9999 View Post

I'd really like to know the difference between these and the yamaha 400's. The specs are the same according to the yamaha website.

Here is one comparison:
http://www.custom-cable.co.uk/blog/yamaha-hph-pro400-review-versus-hph-pro500/
post #20 of 81

Awesome review of both including the momemtum. Thanks a ton Habu, it was very much appreciated. I tried looking for something like that for the last half day or so and found nothing. Thanks again for the link.

post #21 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by tseliottt View Post

Sound like successors to the D2000s! The new audiophile bass monsters.

 

Nonsense. The PRO 500 is not a bass monster.

post #22 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by LinkPro View Post

 

Uh, the aluminum used on these is nothing like the aluminum used on soda cans. Trust me, I took materials science classes. If you use the Al-3 series (the one on soda cans) the headband would deform the very moment you try to bend them. Industrial grade aluminum alloys are actually quite expensive depending on their characteristics and intended use.

 

And HE400 again? open vs closed, ugly vs stylish, home use vs portable. You just went full retard dude, never do it again.

There is no reason to throw out insults. Obviously, it isn't the bendable aluminium alloy that is in soda cans. I used that example to demonstrate that it is a commonly found metal that is not really considered luxurious or premium. Sure, you guys can say that the plastic and aluminium feels high-quality and luxurious, but let's be real. It's plastic and aluminium. The reason manufacturers use it is because it is inexpensive. lol.

 

The fact remains that the Pro 400 has the exact same specs w/o aluminium earcups retails for $300. The Pro 500 is $100 more for the addition of aluminium earcups. I would think that it is pretty obvious there is some pretty severe price inflation.

 

The reason I brought up the HE400 is that the HE400 uses orthodynamic drivers and from what I've heard is extremely highly-rated for its well-tuned audiophile-grade sound. I am pointing out what you can purchase in today's headphone market for a cool $400. Price point comparison lol. I noted that it was open, and I am aware it is not for portable use. If you are talking about accurate hi-fi sound reproduction/quality, the HE400 is in a different league. That is why the Pro 500 should not be in that price range.

 

The Pro 500 from what I've read is a well-tuned colored pair of headphones with a bass boost. Its real competitors are in the $300 & less price range. There is no reason to pay an additional $100 for the Yamaha sound signature when there are just as good colored sound signatures from competitors.

 

I hope you now understand my argument. These are just critical observations on their product. No need to get personally insulted. In the future, please try to refrain from throwing out insults. It only makes you look bad, especially when you completely missed the point (price comparison to illustrate that it is overpriced for its class).


Edited by money4me247 - 3/4/13 at 8:33pm
post #23 of 81

The $400+ price tag is what draws consumers to these types of headphones. They are flashy and used as an accessory, consumers   are drawn to them because the $120 better sounding just as portable M50's don't look as "cool".

 

Its a fad that  will soon pass, remember when putting loud fart cans on your Honda civic was "cool", wearing ed hardy was "sick",  soon flashy, low quality headphones will retire into Dou che -bag heaven and the teen market will move on to the next thing, which will be overpriced low quality something. 

 

Lets all accept that, enjoy our "real head-fi"  beerchug.gif

post #24 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by money4me247 View Post

There is no reason to throw out insults. Obviously, it isn't the bendable aluminium alloy that is in soda cans. I used that example to demonstrate that it is a commonly found metal that is not really considered luxurious or premium. Sure, you guys can say that the plastic and aluminium feels high-quality and luxurious, but let's be real. It's plastic and aluminium. The reason manufacturers use it is because it is inexpensive. lol.

 

The fact remains that the Pro 400 has the exact same specs w/o aluminium earcups retails for $300. The Pro 500 is $100 more for the addition of aluminium earcups. I would think that it is pretty obvious there is some pretty severe price inflation.

 

The reason I brought up the HE400 is that the HE400 uses orthodynamic drivers and from what I've heard is extremely highly-rated for its well-tuned audiophile-grade sound. I am pointing out what you can purchase in today's headphone market for a cool $400. Price point comparison lol. I noted that it was open, and I am aware it is not for portable use. If you are talking about accurate hi-fi sound reproduction/quality, the HE400 is in a different league. That is why the Pro 500 should not be in that price range.

 

The Pro 500 from what I've read is a well-tuned colored pair of headphones with a bass boost. Its real competitors are in the $300 & less price range. There is no reason to pay an additional $100 for the Yamaha sound signature when there are just as good colored sound signatures from competitors.

 

I hope you now understand my argument. These are just critical observations on their product. No need to get personally insulted. In the future, please try to refrain from throwing out insults. It only makes you look bad, especially when you completely missed the point (price comparison to illustrate that it is overpriced for its class).

 

Some people notice that the aluminum ear cups do change the sound for the better, at least that's what they want to believe. Ear cups do have an impact on the driver's sound though, good or bad it depends. And manufacturers use plastic and aluminum because they are cheap AND light, which is important for anything portable.

 

I also never buy into the BS that orthos are any better than conventional dynamic drivers. Sure they use a different technology, but that just means they're different. And in hi-fi it is more about preferences. You do realize that comparing the Yamaha to the Hifiman is borderline apples to oranges yet you still do it anyway. Despite whatever Yamaha may say the Pros are not meant to compete with the Hifiman stuff or anything like that. The HE400 is not even that accurate sounding according to some owners. If you still want to compare price, how about getting the Pro 500 and the HE400, plug both into an iPhone with no amps and do a sound comparison. I doubt the 400 can even get to adequate listening volume without sounding like crap.

 

I don't want to hate the HE400, but I do find it rather annoying when people bring it out to compare with headphones that are not even designed to compete with it. Just shows how close minded they are.

post #25 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by money4me247 View Post

There is no reason to throw out insults.

 

The fact remains that the Pro 400 has the exact same specs w/o aluminium earcups retails for $300.

 

..except when you are begging for them.

 

They may have the same specs but the sound is going to be different when you have a driver housing bolted to a thick aluminum earcup.  I know what your next question is going to be so I will refer you to Newton's third law of motion...

post #26 of 81
Nice review Mark! For the most part I agree although I would not call them v-shaped to my ears (perhaps smiley-shaped). While there's a bit of bass punch and impact, I find that that the mids and highs fall nicely in line with the bass. The highs are smooth with shimmer but overall they are very clean and not edgy at all to my ears (especially in comparison to something like the HD25 or Amperior). I'd agree they are pretty bold and dramatic and that's why I've fallen in love with them. Engaging is the right word and it makes me feel like I'm actually at a concert. I especially appreciate the reproduction of drums and other percussive instruments. Love your comment about the twang of strings - what these excel in is reproducing great tonality and decay. Reminds me of my favorite IEM the HJE900, although IIRC, you weren't a fan of those with its bassy sound sig. For me this is a much more refined hp version of those IEMs.

Anyway these cans still amaze me and have me just enjoying the music. They are fun and musical while still being incredibly resolving and that is very hard to find in a headphone. It's also the first headphone I can say that's definitely worth the price tag for all the attributes it has.
Edited by roma101 - 3/6/13 at 2:03pm
post #27 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beagle View Post

 

..except when you are begging for them.

 

They may have the same specs but the sound is going to be different when you have a driver housing bolted to a thick aluminum earcup.  I know what your next question is going to be so I will refer you to Newton's third law of motion...

 

Different doesn't equal better. lol. There are very good sounding headphones with all different kinds of earcup materials, so you can't really say that the material aluminium inherently positively effects the sound. Don't you guys remember Monster's Cable Claims? (different materials but no objectively measurable upgrade in performance)

 

The change from plastic to aluminium should not cost an extra $100 even if they tuned the sound in the Pro 500 as they should have also tuned the sound in the Pro 400. In my opinion, the fact that they didn't just use the "nicer" material to begin with is just a business strategy to maximize profits. Keep in mind this "nicer" material is aluminium. A very common everyday material that can also be found in very cheap headphones. I personally get the sense that they are just using marketing tricks to artificially inflate the price of these headphones, but that is just my opinion.

 

Has anyone here even done a blind test between the Pro 400 and the Pro 500? 

 

I am just voicing my personal opinion, which may be different from yours. That is really not a big deal. I don't feel the need to insult other people because their opinions are different. I am not sure why you feel the need to do so, but I think these forums would be a nicer community if you stopped that kind of behavior whenever someone disagrees with you.

 

Roma101 loves his Pro 500 and thinks they are worth the money. That's his opinion and that's fine. lol

post #28 of 81
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by roma101 View Post

Nice review Mark! For the most part I agree although I would not call them v-shaped to my ears (perhaps smiley-shaped). While there's a bit of bass punch and impact, I find that that the mids and highs fall nicely in line with the bass. The highs are smooth with shimmer but overall they are very clean and not edgy at all to my ears (especially in comparison to something like the HD25 or Amperior). I'd agree they are pretty bold and dramatic and that's why I've fallen in love with them. Engaging is the right word and it makes me feel like I'm actually at a concert. I especially appreciate the reproduction of drums and other percussive instruments. Love your comment about the twang of strings - what these excel in is reproducing great tonality and decay. Reminds me of my favorite IEM the HJE900, although IIRC, you weren't a fan of those with its bassy sound sig. For me this is a much more refined hp version of those IEMs.

Anyway these cans still amaze me and have me just enjoying the music. They are fun and musical while still being incredibly resolving and that is very hard to find in a headphone. It's also the first headphone I can say that's definitely worth the price tag for all the attributes it has.


yes your very right about the HJE900's they were to my ears rather like these in that they had a bit much potency particularly in the low end.  very good but too powerful and energetic.  must confuss though, cant say ive ever missed the HJE900 but am the Pro 500's a little bit.

post #29 of 81

Yep, glad to have you take on that. I had been looking for a headphone to match the timbre, decay and overall sound sig I've heard in the HJEs, but I never thought I would find anything comparable. The 500s are that and much more in overall detail, refinement, balance and layering to my ears.

post #30 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by money4me247 View Post

Well, I guess it depends on what you are comparing them too?

 

Other closed bassy headphones that you can get for more than $100 cheaper off the top of my head: Beyer DT900 ($320), V-Moda M100 ($300), Mad Dogs ($300), Ultrasone 900 ($300), Denon AH-D400 ($240), ATH-WS99 ($240), UE6000 ($200), beyerdynamic dt770 ($170), Audio-Technica ATH-PRO700MK2 ($178), V-Moda LP2 ($175), Ultrasone HFI 580 ($120), M-Audio Q-40 ($120), Audio-Technica ATH-M50 ($116)

 

Other closed headphones with a more balanced sound that are still cheaper: Sennheiser Momentum ($350), Sony MDR-1R ($300), AKG Q701 (open - $300), AKG K550/K551 ($223-323), Shure SRH-840 ($165), V-Moda M-80 ($140)

 

If you are getting a portable, closed, colored pair of headphones... why would you blow $400 for a company that has no prior headphone experience, was too boring to come up with their own design/style, still somehow managed to make their headphones less comfortable than the Beats while copy-pasting their design, made their premium headphones out of mostly plastic, advertises their v-shaped bass-emphasized sound as "studio sound" & "accurately produces all genres of music" & "used by professionals"?

 

The whole thing just screams overpriced to me. Yamaha legitimately looked at the headphone market and probably thought, wow, if idiots are willing to throw down $300 for Beats, we can totally mark-up $100 for slightly tuning the sound. They didn't even have to spend any R&D on design. They are calling their aluminum earcups as premium quality... you know, aluminum alloy, the same premium materials that Coca-Cola uses in its soda cans.

 

Am I seriously the only person that thinks this is ridiculous?

 

Yamaha Pro 500's $400 price point would be competing against HiFiMAN HE-400 (open, orthodynamic drivers!!! - $400).

The hell are you talking about? Have you even listened to the things? *sigh* I assume you've flamed Beats before, considering that you're flaming these cans that are one of the top closed-back choices in this price range. Open orthos are great, and I've already put the LCD-2 on my wishlist, but you just can't compare open with closed. Plus, the HE-400 looks like a friggin' strainer! I say, the only thing that looks similar (to my knowledge) is another offering by HiFi Man, and the Stax SR-009.

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