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Spider Moonlight "STUDIO" Headphones - Page 2

post #16 of 47
Thread Starter 

Yesterday, after 6 hours of continuous use, I "got used to" their sound signature and didn't find them as "empty"/thin (i.e. I was actually starting to hear bass guitar passages, and a more full-bodied sound). Still, a bit unnatural to my ears...

 

I will leave them running this weekend at home and test them with my home amp. (and also take some pics ;-))

 

Today I brought their PowerForce at work... Very nice little headphones! (cheap too!)


Edited by gelocks - 3/8/13 at 7:56am
post #17 of 47
Thread Starter 

Update:

 

Yeah, I have had these for more than a month now and have alternated it with a couple other headphones I have at home (i.e. M-Audio Q40s, Ultrasone Signature Pro, Mad Dogs, House of Marley Rise Up, Spider PowerForce, etc.) and still DON'T like their sound! :-(

 

I REALLY wanted to like them as I love how the look but too many cons very little pros...

 

If I would have to give a rating, I would rate them: "Meh!"

To me they are NOT worth $350... most of the headphones I have at home sound better to my ears!

 

Thanks.

post #18 of 47

appreciate the update

post #19 of 47

popcorn.gif

post #20 of 47
Thread Starter 

You like popcorn?

 

:-p

post #21 of 47
Watching...waiting....
Specs says 10hz, n its liken to a 940...geez it looked buried.

It said somewhere in the literature the cups are huge..
Maybe the seal wasnt effective.for some heads...aka k550?

How big are the drivrrs...50mm?
post #22 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorspeaker View Post

Watching...waiting....
Specs says 10hz, n its liken to a 940...geez it looked buried.

It said somewhere in the literature the cups are huge..
Maybe the seal wasnt effective.for some heads...aka k550?

How big are the drivrrs...50mm?

 

Yeah, specs look good, execution is poor.

It COULD be seal issues since the pads are SO big that it makes them a bit uncomfortable... they also weight a bit and the bulky Y-cable also add weight and pull down on the headphones a bit, but the highs are so boosted anyway that even with more bass presence, listening experience wouldn't be optimal...

 

I LOVE the Shure SRH940s... these I don't prefer over the Shures, not at all.

 

Drivers I BELIEVE it's 40mm/42mm (would have to check the box/documentation again.). 64Ohm. The positive things are the pads which are comfy, construction seems excellent and durable but too many cons (as mentioned on the previous page.)

 

I don't think you'll see more reviews of this one though... I would like for more members to test them and maybe verify if indeed it's "fit issues" destroying my experience but, wishful thinking I guess.

post #23 of 47

Can you try holding them a bit tighter to your head to see about fit?

 Rule that out first.

 After that you could also try something easily removable: A layer of craft felt ( or two ) in the entire ear opening to see if it takes the treble down just enough to find a happy medium. Definitely worth a try anyhow.

 

I'm not going to suggest a 60000 hour break-in period,  though it is tempting

post #24 of 47

I think those with well chiselled angular slim modelling faces have difficulty with big cups...@@ tongue_smile.gif

post #25 of 47
Thread Starter 

Yeah, already tried that "holding them tighter" thingie... meh! lol

post #26 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorspeaker View Post

I think those with well chiselled angular slim modelling faces have difficulty with big cups...@@ tongue_smile.gif

 

LOL!

That might be it! ;-)

post #27 of 47
Mmmmmm big cups... Oh wait headphones... biggrin.gif

Sent from my HTC Desire HD A9191 using Tapatalk 2
post #28 of 47
Thread Starter 

Sooo... just noticed that both of these were mentioned on Jude's Summer Guide:

 

http://www.head-fi.org/a/2013-head-fi-summer-buying-guide-over-ear-headphones

 

Quote:

TYPE: Closed, on-the-ear and around-the-ear headphones

PRICE: $129.99 and $359.99, respectively

URL: www.spiderproduct.com

When it comes to styling their over-ear headphones, Spider has so far taken a rather literal-minded approach. Let's start with the Spider PowerForce, which Spider decided to style with the word "spider" in mind. Huge spider logos on the earcup endpieces; molded spiderweb pattern around the entire outer rim of each earcup; quilt-stitched headband padding that reminds me of (you guessed it) a spiderweb. The Spider PowerForce looks to me like an extremely spider-themed Heil Sound Pro Set 3 headphone (which I haven't yet heard, so I can't confirm whether the Heil is or isn't the PowerForce's sonic equal).

Here's the thing, though: The PowerForce is actually a very good headphone, especially if you're the type who prefers emphasized bass response. Yes, I know, that description--in consideration of the styling--might make you think I'm foisting a typical consumer basshead headphone your way, but you'd be wrong. The PowerForce actually has good midrange presence, and surprising treble clarity. And the bass, though prominent, has good control and speed. The PowerForce is a wonderful headphone for the person who has audiophile tendencies blended with a dash of basshead bent. Depending on what I'm listening to, depending on my mood, I can occasionally be described that way, so I really like the PowerForce's combination of sonic qualities. But that styling...hmmm... I can forgive the styling for the price, which, with careful shopping, I've seen come in substantially lower than the $129.99 price I've listed. I can recommend it at its price, but finding it for less makes it an even easier recommendation if the sound I've described appeals to you, too.

 

While we're back on the subject of styling, Spider chose to style its flagship Moonlight Studio Monitor with the word "moon" firmly in mind. Each gigantic (and I do mean gigantic) earcup has a very prominent design that I'm guessing is supposed to look like a lunar eclipse. The ends of the headband have very proud crescent ornaments adorning them, and the sizing portion of the yokes have hanging circle ornaments that I imagine may be intended to symbolize full moons. Rather shockingly, Spider missed an opportunity to style the yokes as still two more crescents (and I'm glad for it). However, with its very extensive use of brushed aluminum, I will admit that the Moonlight Studio Monitor's appearance has grown on me, and is certainly unique.

Intended as a professional monitor, the Moonlight Studio Monitor, in my opinion, sounds quite good. I'd describe this headphone as revealing, and sometimes mildly unforgiving. Bright? Perhaps a bit, but not to the extent that, say, the Shure SRH1440 is (I'm a Shure fan, but that model is just too bright for me). I haven't had issues with sibilance with the Moonlight Studio Monitor (which is something I'm quite sensitive to); and I actually appreciate its level of treble presence when I'm listening at lower volumes (which is how I listen more often than not). Midrange clarity is also good, but sounds mildly recessed to me. Bass impact and extension sounds good and seems nimble enough, but perhaps with a bit of upper-mid-bass emphasis.

Given its tonal balance, I can see why Spider fancies this model a professional studio monitor. Soundstaging for a closed headphone is also very airy, very spacious, perhaps helped by the large sized earcups. I have to imagine Spider's Ronny Tsai is a fan of classical and jazz, as his flagship tends to shine most with music in those genres, and other acoustic music.

The Moonlight Studio Monitors earpads seem to be made of synthetic leather over thick memory foam. I've found that it takes a little while (well under a minute, but longer than most earpads) to settle into a good seal on my big ol' head. And getting a good seal is very important with this headphone--otherwise you may think it bright and bass light.

My biggest strike against the Moonlight Studio Monitor is its cable, which has to be one of the worst stock headphone cables I've come across in quite some time. The Moonlight's cable is a dual-entry design (which is fine with me), and is covered in what feels to me like thick Techflex (which is not fine with me). This covering makes the cable ultra-stiff, abrasive feeling, and virtually impossible to dress--it doesn't want to coil or wrap, it wants to be straight. So on my to-do list now is a call to Moon Audio, ALO Audio, or Toxic Cables to ask for a custom cable solution for an otherwise very nice headphone.

Perhaps Spider thought that standing out in an increasingly crowded market necessitated extreme styling, not just good sound. I'll leave it up to you to decide on how they look; but the PowerForce and Moonlight Studio Monitor are, in my opinion, very good sounding headphones that merit your sonic consideration.

 

Seems Jude mirrors most of my sentiments for these guys, though he seems a bit more enthusiastic about them! ;-)

To be honest, I haven't sold the Moonlights because I just love how they look and I'm waiting to see if I can buy some other cables for them (that will be my next step...). Who knows, maybe with the new cables not being so darn heavy, microphonic, etc. I'll have a better experience!

 

Check.

post #29 of 47

You mentioned the driver size as possibly 40-42mm.  If you have the box handy at some point could you let me know what it is? I'll go check the vids again maybe they mention it. Nothing at the site.

 

 

OOOPs yeah the video linked at the other thread says 50mm


Edited by nick n - 7/26/13 at 5:26pm
post #30 of 47
Thread Starter 

Ok, cause the Box DOESN'T SAY ANYTHING! lol! ;)

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