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Turntable beginner?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Before I start I'm sorry if this is in the wrong section but I wasn't sure where to put it.
Anyways, I am quite new to turntables and I really couldn't find too much doccumentation on this topic in particular.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002S1CJ2Q/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
 
 
I think I will be wanting to purchase this particular headphone but I'm not sure what to purchase so that I could plug in or use headphones with this turntable.
Thanks in advance.

post #2 of 10

This turntable provides a "line level" output which is handled no differently than a CD or tape player output. All you will need is a preamp/reciever with a headphone output or a dedicated headphone amp with a line input and you are good to go.

post #3 of 10

If you grew up with digital music like me, be prepared to have a certain degree of disappointment. Some worth mentioning are; 1) vinyl crackling and popping will stick out so bad using headphones. Get a pair of good speakers and they'll be a little bit more ignorable. 2) badly calibrated/cheap equipment will render your music worse than 56kbps music.

 

However, if you've set your mind to it, it will all be worth it in the long run.

post #4 of 10

Not a bad table for dipping your toes into the world of vinyl.

 

But down the road, consider something like a Rega RP1 ($449), a Pro-ject Phono Box ($149), and an Ortofon 2M Red cartridge ($99). Sounds expensive, but it really brings your vinyl above and beyond the level of CD's.

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by penmarker View Post

If you grew up with digital music like me, be prepared to have a certain degree of disappointment. Some worth mentioning are; 1) vinyl crackling and popping will stick out so bad using headphones. Get a pair of good speakers and they'll be a little bit more ignorable. 2) badly calibrated/cheap equipment will render your music worse than 56kbps music.

 

However, if you've set your mind to it, it will all be worth it in the long run.

 

I too grew up in the digital age and never owned vinyl before a few weeks ago. I purchased a used vintage TT off CL and I love it.  I purchased some little things off Amazon to clean the records (mainly newer stuff as I am not really into older rock and what not). I have to agree about the popping.  I only use speakers but there are little pops in there. 

 

But even my wife, who doesnt care about sound quality at all, noticed that the vinyl sounded more full and real vs FLAC < Bifrost  off my computer using the same speakers.   To me the sound of vinyl is something addictive.  Coming from only digital, it is a bit of a hassle cleaning and switching sides etc, but I think its worth it.  I still listen to a lot of flac, but when I have time, i do listen to my vinyl. 

post #6 of 10

"I don't like vinyl because of the pops and scratches."

 

Translation: "I don't take care of my things." wink.gif

 

With clean, well-pressed vinyl, the background reaches CD-level blackness. And sure, you might have an occasional pop or click, but you learn to tune them out after a while and focus on the music.

post #7 of 10

I grew up when vinyl ruled-- and I started collecting at a young age.  While there's something to be said for the convenience of digital-- at least when you get into higher bitrates-- vinyl has an openness that digital just can't reproduce.  A quality record which is well cared for won't pop or click.  

 

There's a low "whir" as the needle rides the groove at high volume, but you hear that only in the dead silence between tracks.  My ultimate sound is a 45rpm stamp of a great recording through a tube amp and a pair of HD800s.  There's nothing more satisfying to my ear.  

 

I still enjoy a 96 or 192k recording, it's definitely more practical-- But for pure sound quality, vinyl is still king to my ears.  

 

Admittedly, you have to drop some cash before vinyl starts catching up to digital (note: I said digital, not CD) but once you're there, it's a remarkable experience.

 

My advice-- go slow and buy quality, if you're going to do it.  That's how you'll have a good experience.  

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipilot227 View Post

"I don't like vinyl because of the pops and scratches."

 

Translation: "I don't take care of my things." wink.gif

 

With clean, well-pressed vinyl, the background reaches CD-level blackness. And sure, you might have an occasional pop or click, but you learn to tune them out after a while and focus on the music.

Eyes and ears open. wink.gif

 

I love vinyl, too, but "clean, well-pressed" is a major achievement and is not something that's altogether common.  I agree with you about the scratches (a sign of care-taking), but pops are sometimes inherent in the vinyl pressing itself.  As for "CD-level blackness," even the best turntables may achieve rumble ratings only down in the -60 to -65dB level.  Granted, that may be beyond audibility in most cases - but it's close.  It's only about half of the quieting that any DAC can do (or sound card).

 

Not trying to discourage here, I agree with some of the past statements about sounding more real, full, etc.  A great setup can rival the best DACs - but there are tradeoffs.

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post

Eyes and ears open. wink.gif

 

I love vinyl, too, but "clean, well-pressed" is a major achievement and is not something that's altogether common.  I agree with you about the scratches (a sign of care-taking), but pops are sometimes inherent in the vinyl pressing itself.  As for "CD-level blackness," even the best turntables may achieve rumble ratings only down in the -60 to -65dB level.  Granted, that may be beyond audibility in most cases - but it's close.  It's only about half of the quieting that any DAC can do (or sound card).

There are a couple of turntables that can manage around the -90dB, but you do need deep pockets or a fat wallet to afford one of them.

The Kenwood L07D will manage -94dB, but you have to be a weight lifter if you want to lift it up, and you need immense luck and deep pockets to put your hands on one.

post #10 of 10

Can't recommend that for a number of reasons

 

1. The internal phono pre-amp is probably horrid for that price

 

2. The USB is gimmicky as hell, IMO

 

3. That turntable is DIRECT DRIVE, where the motor is directly to a rotating shaft. Any motor, no matter how small, will create vibrations. These vibrations will degrade the quality of your music. You should always buy a BELT DRIVEN turntable, where the motor is indirectly attached via a (you guessed it) belt.  

 

4. I've never enjoyed the Audio Technica cartridges.

 

If i were you, go onto craigslist and search for a Dual turntable, they are by far the best brand to start with (My first turntable was specifically a Dual 1237). Then you will need a proper pre-amp and a power amp, preferably a receiver that comes with both. I recommend an older receiver (my first was an NAD something something, I still have it if your in need of a nice receiver).

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