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What is "Well Mastered"? - Page 2

post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magicman74 View Post

Here are my CDs with DR15:

Eric Clapton - 461 Ocean Boulevard (MFSL)
Eagles - The Long Run
Jethro Tull - Aqualung (DCC)
Elton John - Captain Fantastic And The Brown Dirt Cowboy (DJM)
Huey Lewis And The News - Fore!
The Police - Greatest Hits


Umm . . . DR15? I'm assuming this was posted in the wrong place, but maybe I'm wrong, please explain.

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnarwold View Post


Umm . . . DR15? I'm assuming this was posted in the wrong place, but maybe I'm wrong, please explain.

 

Dynamic Range 15dB.

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

All of those qualities are related to mixing and production.  If the ambience or 3D is bad in the original mix, "mastering" can't and won't fix it. 

 

The typical tools in a mastering studio are equalizers that can have their settings recorded and easily re-set, precision gain controls, again with repeatable settings, and a battery of dynamics processors, also resettable.  The material that is being worked with is already mixed down to stereo.  The need for repeatability in settings is very important when cutting a lacquer, because they'll have to cut several, but also useful for a digital master in case any re-release or re-mastering is possible in the future. 

 

What I think is "well mastered" might be very different from what someone else things.  The mastering engineer might define "well mastered" as a job on which he made his client happy enough to come back.  A producer might define it as achieving his vision.  An audiophile might define it as dynamic, clean, or the qualities mentioned above, not that they are related to the actual process of mastering.

 

Yes, I see what you mean.

 

From an audio point of view it seems the mixing and production are more important than mastering. A well mastered recording won't save a poor production, and bad mastering will certainly ruin a good recording.

post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

 

Dynamic Range 15dB.


Thanks

post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnarwold View Post


Thanks

If you're curious about what you're listening to, grab the DR meter here:

http://www.kvraudio.com/product/tt_dynamic_range_meter_by_pleasurize_music_foundation

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnarwold View Post

 
Thanks


This brings me to a question.

 

Are you asking about "audio mastering" in general? After reading the comments from jaddie, it seems to me you might be more interested in mixing and recording.

 

The most common usage of this term is in "re-mastered" music, and it mostly deals with removing noise, improving quality of old recordings, and the notorious dynamic range compression.

post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 

I was interested in what people mean when they say "well mastered". I had a feeling that it had to do more with mixing and recording than actual mastering, but wanted other people's thoughts as well. Of course, I'm always interested in understanding more of the professional recording process (I've done some recording and a lot of live sound reinforcement, but never been wonderfully trained).
 

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnarwold View Post

(I've done some recording and a lot of live sound reinforcement, but never been wonderfully trained).
 

Then you are now as qualified as most of the mixing and mastering guys working today. The accessibility of the tools has given rise to a lot of under-trained, self-professed "engineers".  Not to say you wouldn't do a great job, but don't limit yourself with your vision of qualification.  You might just end up being the best ever!  Or not...wink_face.gif

post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

Then you are now as qualified as most of the mixing and mastering guys working today. The accessibility of the tools has given rise to a lot of under-trained, self-professed "engineers".  Not to say you wouldn't do a great job, but don't limit yourself with your vision of qualification.  You might just end up being the best ever!  Or not...wink_face.gif


hehe thanks! I have been told by many that I have a very good ear, but that only gets you so far :)

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnarwold View Post


hehe thanks! I have been told by many that I have a very good ear, but that only gets you so far :)

Judging by your avatar you're starting your career fairly young.  Do you use remote-crib-mixing systems?

post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

Judging by your avatar you're starting your career fairly young.  Do you use remote-crib-mixing systems?


lol, here's an updated pic

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