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Test transient response - Page 2

post #16 of 28

Here are the test signals for auditioning:

 

 

 

 

test-sigs.zip 32k .zip file
post #17 of 28
Quote:

Originally Posted by jaddie View Post
Lets see, we have "lack of intelligence", "stupid", "logic stinks like said elephant"

 

I never understood why people feel they must resort to insults and accusations of incompetence. When I see that, the first thing I wonder is "how old is this person?"

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaddie View Post
Do yourself a favor.  Google Ethan Weiner.

 

It will help if he spells it correctly! biggrin.gif

 

--Ethan

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanWiner View Post

 

I never understood why people feel they must resort to insults and accusations of incompetence. When I see that, the first thing I wonder is "how old is this person?"

 

 

It will help if he spells it correctly! biggrin.gif

 

--Ethan

Oh, man! I'm SOOO sorry!  Pretty important to get the name right.  

post #19 of 28

I'll mostly let others argue back and forth, but I can add a little.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by scuttle View PostEVERYTHING that isn't computer generated contains "a wide spectrum".

 

Well that's obviously wrong. A tuning fork isn't computer generated and it produces a very pure tone. An electric bass plucked near the center of the string also produces a mostly pure tone with little harmonic energy. I'm sure there are other examples.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scuttle View Postthe ability to deal with high frequency transients is no guarantee at all of the ability to deal with low frequency ones.

 

In the most practical sense, what most people mean when they consider "transient response" is how quickly something can respond. So for common usage transient response is in fact the same as HF response. Now, a 50 Hz tone could rise as quickly as possible given the 20 millisecond maximum rate of change available at 50 Hz, and maybe some could consider that a "transient." But I doubt that's what the OP had in mind.

 

--Ethan

post #20 of 28

scuttle, could you please stop messing up every thread around here? I appreciate the things you are saying but not the way you are saying them. There's no need to be rude or attack others because they disagree. Otherwise you might end up getting banned..

post #21 of 28

Scuttled again. wink_face.gif I find the last post and the member's handle it's about prophetic.

 

There are things than can effectively change a perceived transient response like laggy power supplies or bounce that shows up under higher drain conditions but I agree with Ethan in regards to measurement.


Edited by goodvibes - 2/19/13 at 1:34pm
post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the information guys. Gonna check out all the recommendations posted here later tonight.
 

post #23 of 28

Just received this from Audio Precision.  Note that a new AP test instrument cost's as much as a very nice car.
 

The new APx Burst Waveform Utility creates sine burst waveforms and then saves them and/or uploads them into the APx generator. A burst waveform contains a specified number of cycles of a waveform at full level, followed by a period of cycles at a lower level. The transition from full to low level happens instantly at the zero crossing of the waveform. The low level may be set at any level between 0 and 100%. This utility does not create shaped bursts, where the transition from high to low level occurs gradually over time.

 

Burst waveforms can be useful in testing a number of properties, including power supply transient response and reserve, meter ballistics, and compressor/limiter behavior.

post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedskater View Post

Just received this from Audio Precision.  Note that a new AP test instrument cost's as much as a very nice car.
 

The new APx Burst Waveform Utility creates sine burst waveforms and then saves them and/or uploads them into the APx generator. A burst waveform contains a specified number of cycles of a waveform at full level, followed by a period of cycles at a lower level. The transition from full to low level happens instantly at the zero crossing of the waveform. The low level may be set at any level between 0 and 100%. This utility does not create shaped bursts, where the transition from high to low level occurs gradually over time.

 

Burst waveforms can be useful in testing a number of properties, including power supply transient response and reserve, meter ballistics, and compressor/limiter behavior.

Funny.  I love the AP stuff, and would own a set if I didn't need my two cars.  The burst waveform from the "new utility" is what's funny.  I got me a Tek FG-504 and PG-502, and with gear identical to that I've been able to generate that waveform since the 1970s.  Ok, analog, and perhaps not as precise a number of cycles or quite as exact levels, but zero crossing switching yes.  And, the FG-504 will do a 40MHz output, the PG-502 is fast enough to ping a transmission line.  AP? Probably not.  I got my stuff on eBay, and didn't exactly pay up for it. 

 

Pretty much goes with out saying, but power supply transient response and reserve testing isn't like audio transient response, though one could affect the other.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedskater View Post

Just received this from Audio Precision.  Note that a new AP test instrument cost's as much as a very nice car.
 

The new APx Burst Waveform Utility creates sine burst waveforms and then saves them and/or uploads them into the APx generator. A burst waveform contains a specified number of cycles of a waveform at full level, followed by a period of cycles at a lower level. The transition from full to low level happens instantly at the zero crossing of the waveform. The low level may be set at any level between 0 and 100%. This utility does not create shaped bursts, where the transition from high to low level occurs gradually over time.

 

Burst waveforms can be useful in testing a number of properties, including power supply transient response and reserve, meter ballistics, and compressor/limiter behavior.

 

Create those sine burst waveforms here at a fraction of the price : http://www.wavtones.com/functiongenerator.php (actually, it's free, when no envelope is set).

post #26 of 28

There are several powerful audio programming languages that can be used to generate basically any complex signal (even music), and also for processing. It takes some (although not that much for basic applications like generating a sine wave) time to learn using them, but they are capable of much more than online tone generators and feature-limited trial versions of commercial software, and are usually free and open source.

 

Also, for the specific purpose of creating simple test signals (sine sweeps, MLS, JTest, noise, etc.), I have a 'testgen' utility in this package. It reads the parameters of any number of tones to be generated from a text file.

post #27 of 28

The only thing is the above two solutions are limited by the performance of your sound card.  Not usually a huge problem, but the analog tools have limits that are way up in the MHz region. 

post #28 of 28

Question, do planar magnetics have better transient response than balanced armature IEMs or vice versa? I never heard planar magnetics before, just ordered the Hifiman HE-500's. Thannk you

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