or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Dedicated Source Components › Schiit Bifrost V.S. Peachtree DAC-iT
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Schiit Bifrost V.S. Peachtree DAC-iT - Page 4

post #46 of 71
Woot currently has the DAC-ITx for $350 new and I'm very tempted.

http://www.woot.com/offers/peachtree-audio-digital-to-analog-converter

I currently have a ODAC that I use with an O2 to drive a pair of Mad Dogs (hopefully Alpha Dogs in the near future). I'm perfectly happy with the sound quality of this setup, but I've recently been listening to some 88.2kHz and 192kHz media and wish I had a DAC with native support for these frequencies.

Naturally I'm also considering the Uber Bifrost Usb, but it runs a good deal more expensive (Amazon has B Stock for $470 before shipping fwiw). But it sure is hard to find reviews of the ITx, either subjective or objective in nature.

I prefer that the DAC (and amp) have a flatter, closer to reference response, as opposed to a more "musical" sound. As I interpret an earlier comparison in this thread, the ITx has closer to reference sound and the Bifrost is more musical, but at least one review I found the IT to have a very pleasing frequency response.

Unfortunately I can't sample either, but does anyone, particularly those with DAC-IT or ITx experience have any opinions or links to something useful? Thank you, and let me know if you're also tempted by this deal...
Edited by Mr The Monarch - 3/13/14 at 3:36am
post #47 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr The Monarch View Post

Woot currently has the DAC-ITx for $350 new and I'm very tempted.

http://www.woot.com/offers/peachtree-audio-digital-to-analog-converter

I currently have a ODAC that I use with an O2 to drive a pair of Mad Dogs (hopefully Alpha Dogs in the near future). I'm perfectly happy with the sound quality of this setup, but I've recently been listening to some 88.2kHz and 192kHz media and wish I had a DAC with native support for these frequencies.

Naturally I'm also considering the Uber Bifrost Usb, but it runs a good deal more expensive (Amazon has B Stock for $470 before shipping fwiw). But it sure is hard to find reviews of the ITx, either subjective or objective in nature.

I prefer that the DAC (and amp) have a flatter, closer to reference response, as opposed to a more "musical" sound. As I interpret an earlier comparison in this thread, the ITx has closer to reference sound and the Bifrost is more musical, but at least one review I found the IT to have a very pleasing frequency response.

Unfortunately I can't sample either, but does anyone, particularly those with DAC-IT or ITx experience have any opinions or links to something useful? Thank you, and let me know if you're also tempted by this deal...

 

Hello there, the price on Woot makes it extremely attractive.  I think, for the price difference (and the fact that one is new and the other is B stock), it is difficult to look past the DAC-ITx.

 

I own the DAC-ITx for a couple of days now and found that its sound signature was what I expected.  I was actually happy with my HRT Music Streamer II+ but do find that sometimes I needed more soundstage to my music (I listen to a lot of Classical and Jazz).  The DAC-ITx provided me exactly just that without taking away details nor musicality.  However, one thing I found is that the DAC-ITx has a less lush (full or forward) mids when compared to the HRT but gives me a much larger soundstage.  Unfortunately, I'm not able to compare this with Bitfrost.

 

As sound alone, the DAC-ITx I believe is almost identical to the older DAC-IT.  The only main difference is that the ITx improved on its USB implementation and now allows for 192kHz.  As such, any old review of the DAC-IT is going to be almost identical (sound signature is going to be the same but with better USB implementation).

 

I'm sure you have seen the following reviews of the DAC-IT, however, if you haven't here are some links:

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/428-peachtree-audio-dac-it-review-aka-dacit/

http://www.stereophile.com/content/peachtree-dac149it-da-converter

http://www.highfidelityreview.com/quick-review-few-entry-level-dacs.html

 

Hope this helps.

post #48 of 71

Without getting too much into detail, I can concur about the clinical and colder presentation of the DAC-ITx. The UberBi does, by comparison, sound more 'lush' and, for me, adds to the rich 'analog' sound of my tubes. When comparing them on speakers with my solid-state Luxman, the difference was noticeable to the point where the majority of those listening could easily identify them as DAC A or DAC B based only on the sound. 
IMHO, because 99% of recorded music is mixed like ****, something is necessary to color it for enjoyment - I experienced this heavily when I upgraded my headphones to the beyer T1s while using a clinical amp - just about all my music sounded just like the recordings: poorly made. I needed my equipment to compensate for the content. That's actually why I think the Concero is exceptionally notable with its multiple DSPs. Although I haven't done any formal testing, I have found that the upsampling filters make a distinct difference in the tone presented by the Concero, and at times definitely preferred the use of the filtered upsampling. 


Edited by onelivewire - 3/13/14 at 11:05am
post #49 of 71
Thanks for the help guys. Unfortunately the woot deal sold out, but I was starting to lean more towards the Bifrost due to its upgradability. Amazon Prime (free easy returns) has Uber Bifrosts for $430, I could sample it and if I like it install the Gen 2 USB later. The USB board is plug and play no soldering, right? Or really, I might not even need the USB, my computer has Coax and Optical outs, although they're integrated Realtek POSs. I digress...

The Concero, and especially the Concero HD, look amazing, but that price, with no upgrade possibility kind of puts me off.
post #50 of 71

Yeah the Gen2 USB is just plug it in and go. A lot easier than the Uber analog board.

post #51 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by onelivewire View Post
 

I'm pretty sure it's the standard Concero, but I'll 2x check of course! It's not too often that I buy equipment brand new, since peeps on here seem to cycle through things so fast - but either way, I think the DAC-ITx and UberBi are probably properly priced in relation to one another. The DAC-ITx also lacks 32-bit depth support, which I find myself using more frequently as dedicated vinyl rippers push the limits on consumer tech. Of course, the Bi doesn't have a remote or a sleep timer like the Peachtree, so you choose your battles. 

Either way, I'll try and carve out some good A/B/C comparisons soon if I can, although it'll be hard to pull me away from the record player :P

I researched the Concero since buying my Schiit Bifrost Uber w/ USB. I got it on ebay from an open box seller who hadn't used it for $500 versus $519 off the site. I still wish I had the DSD capabilities of the Concero but the Schiit Loki looks like a cheap alternative to add to my chain. I'm still interested in the performance of the Concero since I have seen it at a high end stereo shop. 

post #52 of 71
Dac shopping below 500, is very very rough...ya can't hear them all. We need to get together, and start up some head-fi stores in metropolitan areas. Just for demos. You pay a set amount per piece, and get a private session with your hps and source.the CEO, a head-fi rep pwrhaps, would be an authorized dealer for all the products, so if you choose to buy ir, you get a slight discount, and take it home. I wish this would happen. But its not a great idea for the owner...because they'd probably lose money. but man, it'd be sweet to have a can convention style store...I'd go 80 miles to the sf bay area to try out amps/dacs...and so would a lot of folks.
post #53 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by hemipowered007 View Post

Dac shopping below 500, is very very rough...ya can't hear them all. We need to get together, and start up some head-fi stores in metropolitan areas. Just for demos. You pay a set amount per piece, and get a private session with your hps and source.the CEO, a head-fi rep pwrhaps, would be an authorized dealer for all the products, so if you choose to buy ir, you get a slight discount, and take it home. I wish this would happen. But its not a great idea for the owner...because they'd probably lose money. but man, it'd be sweet to have a can convention style store...I'd go 80 miles to the sf bay area to try out amps/dacs...and so would a lot of folks.

Closest thing I've ever had to what you just mentioned I encountered at a place in San Diego called Stereo Design. If you Google it they have a place off Clairemont Mesa Blvd. in San Diego. The only issue is they must be payed off by Grado equipment because all they have for demo in their headphone room are Grados ranging down from the PS1000 to 225i. I brought my own pair of headphones there and got to listen to the McIntosh D100 with their digital sources in FLAC :) 

 

Also be reminded this place is called "Stereo Design" so they have a collection of speakers ranging from $1000 to $80000 and a whole wall of McIntosh power amplifiers. Most of their sound rooms are geared towards stereophiles and not headphiles however they do have a nice collection of DACs and amps that have headphone jacks.


Edited by wahsmoh - 3/15/14 at 6:46pm
post #54 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by onelivewire View Post
 

Without getting too much into detail, I can concur about the clinical and colder presentation of the DAC-ITx. The UberBi does, by comparison, sound more 'lush' and, for me, adds to the rich 'analog' sound of my tubes. When comparing them on speakers with my solid-state Luxman, the difference was noticeable to the point where the majority of those listening could easily identify them as DAC A or DAC B based only on the sound. 
IMHO, because 99% of recorded music is mixed like ****, something is necessary to color it for enjoyment - I experienced this heavily when I upgraded my headphones to the beyer T1s while using a clinical amp - just about all my music sounded just like the recordings: poorly made. I needed my equipment to compensate for the content. That's actually why I think the Concero is exceptionally notable with its multiple DSPs. Although I haven't done any formal testing, I have found that the upsampling filters make a distinct difference in the tone presented by the Concero, and at times definitely preferred the use of the filtered upsampling. 

 

did you end up liking the Uber Bifrost better than the Concero?

 

I'm on the fence now myself and will be getting either one of these.  Just cannot decide which is the best way to go...

post #55 of 71

I've just finished A/B'ing the regular mode on the Concero with the Uber Bifrost, since I saw your post Daemon. The most obnoxious thing to deal with was the difference in line levels between the DACs, which had us volume matching with a pair of bottlehead cracks. Anyway, after going through some of our favorite vinyl rips and cds for reference, we could definitely agree on a few things. Firstly, these two DACs are MUCH closer all around than the Uber Bi and the DAC-ITx. While the Peachtree is cold and neutral, both of these are on the warm side, the UberBi being the slightly warmer of the two. In fact, the biggest difference I could notice was the soundstage. The UberBi had a slightly larger soundstage, with more noticeable separation, and a fuller sound. 
In terms of balance, the Concero was brighter, with more pronounced mid-highs and highs, while the UberBi accentuated the bass and mid-bass. I thought the attack and decay might be a bit faster on the Uber, too, but that could have been entirely in my head. I should note that none of this takes into account the digital upsampling filters on the concero, which I'm about to A/B right now. 

post #56 of 71

Ok, after a quick back and forth comparing the regular Concero setting against both of the filters, I have a few conclusions. The regular setting is the most crisp, with quicker attack and decay. The first filter boosts up the lows a bit, as well as the mid-highs and highs, which I found aggressive - and a little muddier than the regular setting. The second essentially the same, with less mid-highs. Basically, I'd consider these filters as much nicer loudness buttons, and on nicer equipment I'm sure I prefer the regular setting. 

post #57 of 71

Onelivewire, I appreciate the comparison. Helps me a lot.

post #58 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by onelivewire View Post
 

I've just finished A/B'ing the regular mode on the Concero with the Uber Bifrost, since I saw your post Daemon. The most obnoxious thing to deal with was the difference in line levels between the DACs, which had us volume matching with a pair of bottlehead cracks. Anyway, after going through some of our favorite vinyl rips and cds for reference, we could definitely agree on a few things. Firstly, these two DACs are MUCH closer all around than the Uber Bi and the DAC-ITx. While the Peachtree is cold and neutral, both of these are on the warm side, the UberBi being the slightly warmer of the two. In fact, the biggest difference I could notice was the soundstage. The UberBi had a slightly larger soundstage, with more noticeable separation, and a fuller sound. 
In terms of balance, the Concero was brighter, with more pronounced mid-highs and highs, while the UberBi accentuated the bass and mid-bass. I thought the attack and decay might be a bit faster on the Uber, too, but that could have been entirely in my head. I should note that none of this takes into account the digital upsampling filters on the concero, which I'm about to A/B right now. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by onelivewire View Post
 

Ok, after a quick back and forth comparing the regular Concero setting against both of the filters, I have a few conclusions. The regular setting is the most crisp, with quicker attack and decay. The first filter boosts up the lows a bit, as well as the mid-highs and highs, which I found aggressive - and a little muddier than the regular setting. The second essentially the same, with less mid-highs. Basically, I'd consider these filters as much nicer loudness buttons, and on nicer equipment I'm sure I prefer the regular setting. 

Wow really nice to hear your impressions. I wasn't sure if it was going to be worth the upgrade to get the Concero. The Schiit Bifrost Uber is such a great deal already I can't see how I could upgrade to anything else unless it was over $1000

post #59 of 71

I have to admit I am a bit surprised by your findings onelivewire.

I always expected the Bifrost to be more airy and basicly, more bright than the peachtree.

YOu A/B them with the HE-400, right? IF so you might have just got me the info I need to decide on the UBER bifrost.

The HE-400 are definitly colored, stronger base and highs. I also really like the idea of a large soundstage, so i am almost positive on the fact ill get the uber bi.

 

pls confirm if what I wrote is how you saw it.

post #60 of 71

When A/B'ing these, it's possible we threw on the HE-400s, but we had a three OTL amps running, so I used the t1s and hd650s the majority of the time, with a little time on the k701s. We were able to reach a pretty clear group consensus regarding the colder, balanced tone of the Peachtree and the warmer tone of the UberBi and Concero. The standard bifrost may very well be brighter and airier, I can't say myself, as I've only heard the UberBi. What are you driving your 400's with?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Dedicated Source Components
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Dedicated Source Components › Schiit Bifrost V.S. Peachtree DAC-iT