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The (new) HD800 Impressions Thread - Page 410

post #6136 of 18782

Need some serious help!  

 

The hinge pin on my HD800 left ear cup popped out tonight.  I was able to put it back together along with the spring.  Seems to be working just fine now.  Seems like a weak link since this is the only piece that holds the cup to the headband.  It is still under warranty is this serious enough to send back?

post #6137 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUMAY408 View Post
 

Need some serious help!  

 

The hinge pin on my HD800 left ear cup popped out tonight.  I was able to put it back together along with the spring.  Seems to be working just fine now.  Seems like a weak link since this is the only piece that holds the cup to the headband.  It is still under warranty is this serious enough to send back?

Was this through normal use? No crazy bending? I would look into replacement if it was under normal conditions IMO.

post #6138 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunk View Post
 

Was this through normal use? No crazy bending? I would look into replacement if it was under normal conditions IMO.

Laid it down when I went out of the room, picked it up and the ear cup came off.  Easy to fix, I'm just concerned that it might continue to pop off.  No wear or tear to any of the pieces so unclear why it came off.  Really took me by surprise.  

post #6139 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopaminer View Post Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
 

 

Sure John,

 

I really recommend checking this place out, Andix Audio  

 

http://www.andix.co.jp/

 

They`re primarily a tube specialty shop, but they decided to start to make these headphone dac/amps.  They had a table at the Tokyo Headphone show a couple of weeks ago.  The owner, Mr. Ishii actually speaks English well and has several amp options to choose from, and he`s very friendly and open to letting you spend the day there testing everything.  At his suggestion I actually packed my laptop, balanced dac, hd800s and all my cables into his shop and demo`d several of his creations.  Highly recommended.  

 

Andix is easy to find - just remember it`s right across the narrow street from the Akihabara "don quixote" store.  

 

I also visited this cooky shop 

 

http://www.e-kasuga.net/

 

a headfier posted about their headphone amp, which I was also considering until I found the Andix :

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/580785/kasuga-ka-10sh-tube-amp-kit-finished

 

 

Here are my `800s with the Andix:

 

 

A splendid photo. Perhaps you could also try one with just the glow of the tubes lighting up the HD800s?

post #6140 of 18782

Some people claim HD800 have 'grey' sound, meaning not very colorful.

(please note: I don't mean 'colored', I mean - not very rich in colors, if we compare shades of colors that make them richer to sounds' richness.

 

I also had this impression when I listened to HD800 once. At that time I thought its because the source/amp were not making them justice.

 

Unfortunately I haven't got a chance to audition HD800 since. Do you have the same impression of the 'grey' sound in HD800?

post #6141 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by korzena View Post
 

Some people claim HD800 have 'grey' sound, meaning not very colorful.

(please note: I don't mean 'colored', I mean - not very rich in colors, if we compare shades of colors that make them richer to sounds' richness.

 

I also had this impression when I listened to HD800 once. At that time I thought its because the source/amp were not making them justice.

 

Unfortunately I haven't got a chance to audition HD800 since. Do you have the same impression of the 'grey' sound in HD800?

Usual Disclaimer: All IMO.

 

The HD-800s were designed purposefully this way, it's a studio headphone. In a studio environment, you are seeking the best possible "translation" so that if it sounds good on them, it will sound good on virtually anything. They don't want to necessarily push something out with a cherry flavor since cherry wouldn't be compatible, with say, beef. Not the best analogy, but it gets the point across :tongue: 

post #6142 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunk View Post
 

Usual Disclaimer: All IMO.

 

The HD-800s were designed purposefully this way, it's a studio headphone. In a studio environment, you are seeking the best possible "translation" so that if it sounds good on them, it will sound good on virtually anything. They don't want to necessarily push something out with a cherry flavor since cherry wouldn't be compatible, with say, beef. Not the best analogy, but it gets the point across :tongue: 

Thanks for the answer. I thought HD800 were too expensive to be a pro studio phone;)

Besides why a studio headphone cannot have a faithful representation of colors of sounds? I'd say it's an important part of music information.


Edited by korzena - 11/8/13 at 12:42pm
post #6143 of 18782
could you clarify what you mean by "colors of sound"? that's not exactly common parlance around here.

hd800s have the fastest most detailed dynamic transducers ever made. I can't identify with the analogy to "grey." If anything, with certain source material, I would argue that they can sound too vivid to be enjoyable with certain amps subject to the topology and handling of high order harmonics.
post #6144 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by korzena View Post
 

Thanks for the answer. I thought HD800 were too expensive to be a pro studio phone;)

Besides why a studio headphone cannot have a faithful representation of colors of sounds? I'd say it's an important part of music information.

In a concert the environment is determined, starting with microphones, going through cables, mixers, effects, amps, speakers, and ending with the acoustic properties of the venue. What you get is a finished product, hopefully at it's best.

In studio work most of these factors are unknown, and the only reasonable choice is a compromise - the output must sound good through $2 IEMs on an mp3 player, in an elevator, a car player and on a high end audiophile system. On top of that there are individual preferences regarding volume level, tonal balance etc. Each of these environments and components colors the sound in it's own way. To have the best possible control over the final output, engineers tend to use components with possibly flat characteristics - that way you can have reasonably complex sound path without needing to worry about particular frequency suddenly booming or something like that. 

Many audiophiles have pretty complex setups as well and then the choice of flat response curve is also very desirable - not because it is enjoyable to everyone out of the bat, but because it's easier to control it and tune it to their individual tastes and preferences.

HD800 fits this purpose quite well, but no one says it's the only option. If your needs are different you have choices - there are Grados, Audezes and others that have different characteristics. 

post #6145 of 18782

I'm considering getting the HD800 and have been reading about its sensitivity to sources. 

 

My rig is a DX100 & Portaphile 627X. Does anyone have experience with the HD800/627X pairing?

 

Would this be a good match for the HD800?


Edited by Omphalopsychite - 11/8/13 at 10:04pm
post #6146 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by korzena View Post
 

Thanks for the answer. I thought HD800 were too expensive to be a pro studio phone;)

Besides why a studio headphone cannot have a faithful representation of colors of sounds? I'd say it's an important part of music information.

I think what you mean is that it lacks 'euphony.' For instance, see David Mahler's excellent thread on "The Battle of the Flagships," and what he has to say about the HD800. On the other hand, it is a superbly neutral headphone-- the goal is to not have any particular character, except transparency--to get out of the way and let the music be the place where the colour is. At the end of the day, we want our gear to disappear--leaving just the music. In the right conditions, the HD800 can do this trick very, very well. Not perfect of course, but many agree it's on the cutting edge for dynamic (headphone) transducers.

post #6147 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantSounds View Post
 

In a concert the environment is determined, starting with microphones, going through cables, mixers, effects, amps, speakers, and ending with the acoustic properties of the venue. What you get is a finished product, hopefully at it's best.

In studio work most of these factors are unknown, and the only reasonable choice is a compromise - the output must sound good through $2 IEMs on an mp3 player, in an elevator, a car player and on a high end audiophile system. On top of that there are individual preferences regarding volume level, tonal balance etc. Each of these environments and components colors the sound in it's own way. To have the best possible control over the final output, engineers tend to use components with possibly flat characteristics - that way you can have reasonably complex sound path without needing to worry about particular frequency suddenly booming or something like that. 

Many audiophiles have pretty complex setups as well and then the choice of flat response curve is also very desirable - not because it is enjoyable to everyone out of the bat, but because it's easier to control it and tune it to their individual tastes and preferences.

HD800 fits this purpose quite well, but no one says it's the only option. If your needs are different you have choices - there are Grados, Audezes and others that have different characteristics. 

+1 Very well said.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcamera View Post
 

I think what you mean is that it lacks 'euphony.' For instance, see David Mahler's excellent thread on "The Battle of the Flagships," and what he has to say about the HD800. On the other hand, it is a superbly neutral headphone-- the goal is to not have any particular character, except transparency--to get out of the way and let the music be the place where the colour is. At the end of the day, we want our gear to disappear--leaving just the music. In the right conditions, the HD800 can do this trick very, very well. Not perfect of course, but many agree it's on the cutting edge for dynamic (headphone) transducers.

I agree, and I have similar results with the HE-6 as well.

post #6148 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunk View Post
 

+1 Very well said.

 

I agree, and I have similar results with the HE-6 as well.

 

Do you find much difference between the HE6 and HD800 in terms of smoothness/lushness with your rigs?  

post #6149 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by drez View Post
 

 

Do you find much difference between the HE6 and HD800 in terms of smoothness/lushness with your rigs?  

at both extremes of the audible range, yes i do. The HE-6 is overall much more linear in that aspect. If you clip those extremes off, it's a much closer comparison. Both are highly transparent, with the HD-800 eeking out just a bit more. For naturalness (richer in harmonic content) the HE-6 is the champ, where the HD-800 just decays too quickly, not giving out the full note. Pick your poison, I have both, but I can easily decide my "island" headphone :wink_face:

post #6150 of 18782
Quote:
Originally Posted by brunk View Post
 

at both extremes of the audible range, yes i do. The HE-6 is overall much more linear in that aspect. If you clip those extremes off, it's a much closer comparison. Both are highly transparent, with the HD-800 eeking out just a bit more. For naturalness (richer in harmonic content) the HE-6 is the champ, where the HD-800 just decays too quickly, not giving out the full note. Pick your poison, I have both, but I can easily decide my "island" headphone :wink_face:

which is?

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