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Non-audiophile reactions to high-end headphones Part II - Page 44

post #646 of 3530
There's no conspiracy against you. Nor am I being rude or snide about you. You are no doubt a wonderful person. But we all have limited empathy and altruism. Otherwise we'd give away all we owned to someone more deserving. It's the same with our ability to understand and appreciate others - it marks us out as beautiful evolutionary creatures but it's finite nature also means we are still essentially selfish. Your friends all want to hear about your interests, but only to a degree and they will lie and humour you to avoid insult. They will also use humour to insult you. That's the paradox about friendships.

 

It doesn't have to do with friends. There are lots of stories on this thread that have nothing to do with that.


Anyway, on the subject of the Golden Ears and being able to somehow have enhanced hearing. Well maybe, but I doubt you have it. Most likely you just think you do.

 

It doesn't imply that one needs to have above average hearing in order to appreciate the difference. It has to do with experience and knowing how all the components of music come together, both technically and subjectively, which trained listeners have and inexperienced people don't. This is my entire point to begin with; many people can't tell the difference between low-fi and high-fi not because of any physical differences, but simply because they have no idea what to be listening for or how to listen to music technically because they're usually not as invested or interested in music. Listening to music as an average Joe and listening to music as an audiophile are two completely different processes and experiences.

post #647 of 3530
I agree with you, but isn't that quite a damning conclusion?

I mean, if 'normal' people can enjoy music just as much as an audiophile, while saving all that precious time and money, doesn't that mean your hobby is all about the time and money?

Maybe it's really all about the technology rather than the music?
Edited by Muzeick - 7/19/13 at 1:20am
post #648 of 3530

Soooo.... looks like this thread is heading to self-destruction again?

 

Perhaps I can be of some assistance. Bout a week ago, old friend of mine dropped by. He had heard my previous cans the Senn HD555 & HD595. But I wanted to let him try my more current gear. Initially, it was more impressed by the 702 Annies with their clarity and crisp details. Cool part was, I got him to listen to the HD650 a bit more with Beethoven's 6th (1st movement) and you could just see him lean back in the chair, close his eyes... and float right off.  After another 20-30 minutes with other tracks he declared the HD650s as easily the best he's heard.
 

post #649 of 3530
Good news.

Make him smoke some pot next time and he'll no doubt be In heaven.

Which begs the question: how come nobody's invented a legal audiophile drug yet? Could be huge.
Edited by Muzeick - 7/19/13 at 2:12am
post #650 of 3530
Which begs the question: how come nobody's invented a legal audiophile drug yet? Could be huge.

 

http://i-doser.com/

post #651 of 3530
Ha - quality! Does it work?
post #652 of 3530

Nope. In fact, it's banned from What.CD because it doesn't work and the fact that it killed new people's download/upload ratios.

post #653 of 3530
Ah well - will stick to my opium pipe then.
post #654 of 3530

i am using he500 and hd650 for sometime now... it was hard for me to spot differences between my previous sony xb1000 and these phones. I didn't feel much difference by upgrading to hd650 but i did feel some difference when i went to he500 as my ears became more accustomed to understanding change. When i first heard the hd650, i thought that it was a waste of money, but slowly after months when i got used to it, i switched back to the xb1000 and i was literally shocked. I could not believe how bad they sounded compared to the sweet sound of hd650, the soundstage was choking and there was zero detail and air compared to the hd650. That is when i understood what the change actually is. I think at start you can feel the change but cannot comprehend it properly as you brain is not fine tuned. But after a while when you switch back, then you will be amazed how good the newer, better equipment is. When i went to the he500 i could spot a lot more differences, wider soundstage and a lot lot more treble presence and deeper bass. I could spot difference between the changes of pleather pads or the velour pads too with them. I think your understanding of change is as much a journey as your headphone journey of upgraditus. No one buys a stax unless they know how much better it would be and could atleast spot it.


Edited by h4mm3r 0f th0r - 7/19/13 at 6:33am
post #655 of 3530
So why not just stop at beginning and be happy?
post #656 of 3530
Quote:
Originally Posted by joebobbilly View Post

Soooo.... looks like this thread is heading to self-destruction again?

 

Perhaps I can be of some assistance. Bout a week ago, old friend of mine dropped by. He had heard my previous cans the Senn HD555 & HD595. But I wanted to let him try my more current gear. Initially, it was more impressed by the 702 Annies with their clarity and crisp details. Cool part was, I got him to listen to the HD650 a bit more with Beethoven's 6th (1st movement) and you could just see him lean back in the chair, close his eyes... and float right off.  After another 20-30 minutes with other tracks he declared the HD650s as easily the best he's heard.
 


I imagine if you want people to appreciate better headphones than "beats" etc then you need to see their music choices. Someone with beats in mind won't be listening to beethoven.

post #657 of 3530
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muzeick View Post

So why not just stop at beginning and be happy?

 


well would you be happy if you one day found out that you are "ignorant" that way:D. I mean the equipment should not be too hi fi, as that is just hard to get and would be more about the hobby than the music unless you are a sound pro or something. A headset like hd650 is perfect, which is almost hifi but not quite... it is not a bank breaker but ofcourse not cheap either...

post #658 of 3530
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tus-Chan View Post

On the contrary, I most likely have much improved listening skills than the average person. Trained listeners, AKA those with audiophile experience, have been scientifically proven to be far better at evaluating music and equipment than the untrained layman. I can even link you to the study if you wish me to.
I totally agree with you, it's like vision. Some people see well and some people don't. showing someone who needs glasses a beautiful picture would be a waste. They want something that's big and in their face. The worst part is there's no way of putting "glasses" on someone's ears. So until science can develop a way to sharpen someone's hearing, audiophiles will continue to be frustrated.
A lack of audiophile ears might explain why people want tons of bass. Since you can often feel bass with your whole body rather than just your ears. It would only make sense that if they could experience only the bass end of the spectrum that they would want a lot of it.
post #659 of 3530
We are all partially sighted and hearing restricted.

Seriously, you are aware our senses only give us the tiniest fraction of the whole reality?
Edited by Muzeick - 7/19/13 at 7:10am
post #660 of 3530
Yahoo just posted this article
http://shopping.yahoo.com/news/audeze-lcd3-review---the-ultimate--1945-headphones--012301430.html

It seems in the comments section most people disagree.......
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