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160 watts RMS old speakers no subwoofer

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

 

 

but mine is 160 watts rms/2000 pmpo, very old.

 

is that better than this?

 

http://www.pctronix.com/W_MD201.htm

 

of course the big ones dont have enough bass but i am just asking because i feel insecure if i made the correct decision, if not then i will just switch back.

 

i am connecting it to my on board hd (pc) using the video aux preset on the middle thing, the center thing had 1 red and 1 white rca receivers so i am just plugin it directly to my motherboard using that, will my onboard audio burn after some time also? if i keep using this big ones?

 

i play mostly lossless ripped music

 

also i would like to use the sub, is it possible? with a rca audio cable like this? it exists? if so how it is called?

 


Edited by dsdsds - 2/6/13 at 4:02am
post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 

bump really need help on this

post #3 of 10

If you connect the headphone-out or line-out to the Aux-input on the Aiwa using a 3.5mm to RCA adapter cable (3.5mm PC end, RCA Aiwa end) that will be fine. That won't harm your PC.

 

Your AIWA needs either a line-out or a sub-out (I doubt it has a sub out) to use a sub with this setup. If the Aiwa doesn't have any sort of line-out that functions while playing music, then you cannot properly add a sub to the system.

 

I wouldn't use an RCA splitter as I've read that puts more strain on the PC. 

If you bought a simple soundcard with a Speaker-out and Line-out, then you you add two things at once, as it would have two dedicated outputs. 

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post

If you connect the headphone-out or line-out to the Aux-input on the Aiwa using a 3.5mm to RCA adapter cable (3.5mm PC end, RCA Aiwa end) that will be fine. That won't harm your PC.

 

Your AIWA needs either a line-out or a sub-out (I doubt it has a sub out) to use a sub with this setup. If the Aiwa doesn't have any sort of line-out that functions while playing music, then you cannot properly add a sub to the system.

 

I wouldn't use an RCA splitter as I've read that puts more strain on the PC. 

If you bought a simple soundcard with a Speaker-out and Line-out, then you you add two things at once, as it would have two dedicated outputs. 

 

i just removed the speakers from the sub and connected it via 3.5mm rca to headphone out (front panel), the aiwa is connected on line out (rear panel) of the pc

 

it sounds nice now since the sub works alone i can adjust it if i want more bass without hurting the music ... awesome. i also set both to line out i nthe realtek hd audio panel instead of one of them being headphones

 

i did it right? the con of this i think is i dont have place for headphones ... i need t oturn off the sub to put my on headphones.

 

its a shame my pc doesnt have another line out or headphone out ...

post #5 of 10

Yes, setting those out-puts to line-level will set it as close as possible to an 'industry standard' line level volume.

Headphone outs can increase volume at the expense of fidelity. The Aux-inputs on the Aiwa and sub are designed to receive line level inputs, so for audio quality you now have the best setup available without upgrading. 

 

Doesn't the AIWA have a headphone socket? It should work in theory, but I wouldn't use it, as the electricity needed to power it doesn't justify the convenience as there probably are no sound benefits to be had from using it.

post #6 of 10

OP what are you trying to achieve? Do you already have the subwoofer or are you planning to purchase it?

 

Some subwoofers have speaker level inputs, which you could plug into your aiwa system without modifying anything.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headzone View Post

OP what are you trying to achieve? Do you already have the subwoofer or are you planning to purchase it?

 

Some subwoofers have speaker level inputs, which you could plug into your aiwa system without modifying anything.

 

i think i already did all i could

 

i am using the sub from this 2.1 pc system http://www.pctronix.com/W_MD201.htm on the front panel of the pc (yes i have the sub)

 

and the aiwa connected to the rear panel.

 

so yeah what i was triying to achieve was using the aiwa but i told myself "where i will get low frequencies?" then i just used the front panel and connected the subwoofer there and there is it.

 

 

I cant connect the aiwa speakers to the sub because the aiwa uses bare wires and the sub only uses RCA inputs and outputs. luckily the aiwa has RCA receivers for video/aux so i used that to connect it to the computer.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post

Yes, setting those out-puts to line-level will set it as close as possible to an 'industry standard' line level volume.

Headphone outs can increase volume at the expense of fidelity. The Aux-inputs on the Aiwa and sub are designed to receive line level inputs, so for audio quality you now have the best setup available without upgrading. 

 

Doesn't the AIWA have a headphone socket? It should work in theory, but I wouldn't use it, as the electricity needed to power it doesn't justify the convenience as there probably are no sound benefits to be had from using it.

 

doesnt have headphone sockets, its way too old man, like from 2000 or 90s


Edited by dsdsds - 2/6/13 at 8:16pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsdsds View Post

 

doesnt have headphone sockets, its way too old man, like from 2000 or 90s


On the front middle/left side of the AIWA it looks like a headphone socket to me. (that's the one I was talking about)

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsdsds View Post

 

i think i already did all i could

 

i am using the sub from this 2.1 pc system http://www.pctronix.com/W_MD201.htm on the front panel of the pc (yes i have the sub)

 

and the aiwa connected to the rear panel.

 

so yeah what i was triying to achieve was using the aiwa but i told myself "where i will get low frequencies?" then i just used the front panel and connected the subwoofer there and there is it.

 

 

I cant connect the aiwa speakers to the sub because the aiwa uses bare wires and the sub only uses RCA inputs and outputs. luckily the aiwa has RCA receivers for video/aux so i used that to connect it to the computer.

 

 

doesnt have headphone sockets, its way too old man, like from 2000 or 90s

Did you try using a 3.5mm splitter? http://www.amazon.com/RiteAV-3-5mm-Splitter/dp/B000V1O1KS

 

It works, but don't know how/if it will affect sound quality.

 

Or did you already get sound out from both of them? 

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GREQ View Post


On the front middle/left side of the AIWA it looks like a headphone socket to me. (that's the one I was talking about)

 

 

its a microphone (for karaoke) socket at least on mine, the one in the picture is another model but looks 90% close to what i have i could not find mine on internet and its okay i dont mind unpluging the sub to listen to headphones and reconfigurate the hd realtek audio manager.


Edited by dsdsds - 2/8/13 at 10:33am
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