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What programs does one use to measure frequency response of cans?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Are any free, would like to know how. Thanks! :)

post #2 of 17

do you have equipment already set up?

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Dam, I need equipment, not just some program? Sorry I have no idea about this stuff lol.

post #4 of 17

Yes, otherwise you can measure the signal that is going into the headphones but not the signal that is coming out of them. For that you need some kind of setup that includes a microphone for recording/analyzing the signal that the headphone is producing.

post #5 of 17

not just a microphone but one that can simulate the physical nature when listening to headphones, plus at least a semi-anechoic chamber to block out foreign noise, but goodluck, it would be great to have more people measuring headphone responses

post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by clairyvic View Post

Are any free, would like to know how. Thanks! :)

 

Heya,

 

The equipment to produce accurate response readings will cost more than you may be interested in spending.

 

What's your budget?

 

Very best,

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

Whats the max 40$ can get me? I just need a general measurement.

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by clairyvic View Post

Whats the max 40$ can get me? I just need a general measurement.

 

Heya,

 

A super cheap microphone that will not even be worth measuring from.

 

Budget is not going to let you do what you want here at all.

 

Very best,

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

I got new pads to widen the soundstage, yet I want the exact sound of the cans without the pads. It was perfect. So my plan would be to measure the sound with the old pads, then adjust it until I have the exact same sound with the new pads. It's hard to compare new and old sound just taking them off and putting them on again. I don't know what to do.

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by clairyvic View Post

I got new pads to widen the soundstage, yet I want the exact sound of the cans without the pads. It was perfect. So my plan would be to measure the sound with the old pads, then adjust it until I have the exact same sound with the new pads. It's hard to compare new and old sound just taking them off and putting them on again. I don't know what to do.

 

Equalize by ear. It takes time. But it's within your budget (ie: free).

 

Very best,

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post

Equalize by ear. It takes time. But it's within your budget (ie: free).

Very best,

This. You don't need to be able to A/B back and forth instantly. In fact it might work better to get very accustomed to A over an extended period of time and then switch to B and use your memory to EQ them to match the sound sig you've become accustomed to.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post

 

Equalize by ear. It takes time. But it's within your budget (ie: free).

 

Very best,

 

 

 

 

I'm wondering, just out of curiosity, how much would the cheapest microphone that still would suit my purposes be?

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by clairyvic View Post

 

 

 

I'm wondering, just out of curiosity, how much would the cheapest microphone that still would suit my purposes be?

 

Heya,

 

Virtually anything $40 or under. It's just they don't have the quality to give you an honest representation of the headphone's response; and you would have to have it setup in a way, inside a dumby head, to incorporate the ear canal, shape of head, and how the cup seals to this surface, and that surface has to be a material that has acoustic properties like skin/hair does. In reality, the microphone doesn't have to be mind blowingly high end. It's more about the total setup and being able to recreate how the headphone will sound to human ears and less so much to a microphone or machine. If you put a microphone up to the driver of a headphone it will not record the actual frequency response because the response is based on the headphone against the surface of a head and the chambers of the ear incorporated. So your budget restraint would actually probably be getting a dumby head with a realistic ear canal and a microphone at the end of that canal.

 

Talk to Tyll at InnerFidelity; he has an account here on Head-Fi. He can steer you in the direction you're looking for maybe. He has the setup that people would dream of having. Maybe he knows an entry-level way to do this.

 

Very best,

post #14 of 17

Mal is right but its just occurred to me... holding a simple microphone up to the headphones might get him at least partly there because the two headphone configurations (different pads) should interact with his head/ears similarly aside from the effect of the pads...

 

Just a thought. clairyvic, you seem pretty set on trying this so for just $40 it might be worth playing around with.

 

EDIT-- Scratch that. On second thought, the interaction of the pads with his head/ears would be the cause of the majority of the difference in sound signature so I don't think my theory holds any water.


Edited by devhen - 2/6/13 at 7:56pm
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

I have a program that does the following: FFT analyzer, meter bridge, octave band analyzer, oscilloscope, spectrogram. Any idea if one of those is the thing that makes those graphs of frequencies.

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