Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › PC as source, semi-noob question... iTunes EQ?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

PC as source, semi-noob question... iTunes EQ?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I have been using the OEM iTunes EQ for a ~3db boost at 32Hz, to help compensate for the deep sub-bass rolloff in all my cans.

 

Is there a better (software) EQ than the one that comes with itunes?

 

thanks

post #2 of 11

Are you running the EQ down for all of the other frequencies and just leaving the 32 Hz slider at neutral?  That is probably the best way to run the EQ.  Have you tried it through Foobar2000 yet?  Also, what version of iTunes are you using?   The latest version is the best sounding so far, but the last few versions had some serious audio issues.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

My version is 11.0.1

 

32Hz = +3db

64Hz = +1.5db

 

I drop the overall output (preamp slider) by ~2.5db, so there is no gain with it engaged. 

 

its a very subtle sub-bass boost, it doesn't really add much by way of fundamental note impact.  It just fills in for the sub-bass roll-off on all my cans


Edited by kramer5150 - 2/4/13 at 8:31am
post #4 of 11

iTunes EQ is by no means bad, it's just inaccurate(or hard to be accurate with). Doing something as broad as a bass boost shouldn't be too difficult with it, you're just not going to be able to do anything like tone down spikes.

 

If you're not willing to use any other media player, you would have to use something like VST host and the electri-q VST plugin. And you'd probably need a software like Virtual Audio Cable to make that work, but that's not free unfortunately. If anyone knows of a free alternative I would like to hear of it. 

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

OK thanks.  Yeah it seems like a good EQ, when used for slight tweeks as I am doing.  I am NOT using it to drastically change the overall tonality of my amps / cans.  That imho is the wrong way to use EQ, and it would negate the reason I chose my specific amps and headphones in the first place.  Both my K701 and RS1 have some deep bass rolloff that I am trying to compensate for, without altering the fundamental notes above 65Hz too much.  Heres the headroom plot, with a DT880 as reference.  I have always liked the 880 its smooth bass response, its got enough "hump" to be fun and musical yet enough deep extension to be accurate.

 

 

 

What I am wondering is does an iTunes EQ exist with another slider at ~20Hz?

How steep is the "Q" slope on the iTunes EQ?  If its broad enough I probably wouldn't even benefit from a deeper slider.

How accurate are its slider locations?

 

Just using my ear as guide, without really knowing what I am hearing, its a good sounding EQ when used as I am doing.

 

thanks!!


Edited by kramer5150 - 2/4/13 at 8:54am
post #6 of 11

That's the problem, it's really hard to say what the Q is.

 

Xnor made some measurements: http://www.head-fi.org/t/526507/audio-player-equalizer-resampling-measurements but didn't use those two sliders. It should give you a general idea of how accurate they are... The bands seem to be fairly accurate as far as position goes, but the Q seems to be narrow enough that it causes a stair-step like curve(when making minor adjustments, I'd imagine they'd bleed into each other more when they're made bigger). It can also be a bit unpredictable. But it's got no distortion at least.

 

 

I'm unaware of any iTunes plugins, sorry. But is there a reason you're restricted to this media player, is it just preference?

 

The best way to do what you're looking to do would be to create one band at 20Hz and bump that up, but you'd probably need a parametric EQ for that like electri-q. Not exactly compatible with iTunes unless you use VST Host.


Edited by chewy4 - 2/4/13 at 9:04am
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Its just familiarity really.  I have finally gotten used to how itunes organizes its "presentation" by ID3 tags.  But I'm not stuck on it or anything.

 

I am not adverse to using a different player, if I get something that sounds better or has a better EQ I'm all for that.  Only real requirement is that it play apple lossless and MP3.

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kramer5150 View Post

My version is 11.0.1

 

32Hz = +3db

64Hz = +1.5db

 

I drop the overall output (preamp slider) by ~2.5db, so there is no gain with it engaged. 

 

its a very subtle sub-bass boost, it doesn't really add much by way of fundamental note impact.  It just fills in for the sub-bass roll-off on all my cans


Does dropping the preamp actually the same as dropping EQ on all other channels? I'd assume so as well, but maybe someone can confirm?

 

I'm actually running my iTunes EQ identical to yours right now (except pre-amp reduction), using a HeadRoom BitHead running USB audio in, USB power, and a brand new set of Senheisser HD449's.

 

Also, on a similar note, I'm using my windows volume slider to adjust music volume, not touching the BitHead volume. Should I instead be running my PC at 100%, and use the BitHead? I'm assuming that the BitHead has a good enough amp to cleanly power the headphones even with the input volume being reduced. 

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by xcracer View Post


Does dropping the preamp actually the same as dropping EQ on all other channels? I'd assume so as well, but maybe someone can confirm?

I'm actually running my iTunes EQ identical to yours right now (except pre-amp reduction), using a HeadRoom BitHead running USB audio in, USB power, and a brand new set of Senheisser HD449's.

Also, on a similar note, I'm using my windows volume slider to adjust music volume, not touching the BitHead volume. Should I instead be running my PC at 100%, and use the BitHead? I'm assuming that the BitHead has a good enough amp to cleanly power the headphones even with the input volume being reduced. 

Dropping the preamp is better than pulling down all the other sliders.

As others noted the apple graphic EQ's behaviour is a bit unpredictable; in particular, dropping down the preamp x dB would result in an even reduction at all frequencies similar to turning down the volume, while pulling down all the frequency sliders down x dB most definitely changes the frequency response. This is probably true of all graphic EQs.

I'd say that you are fine setting your volume at the PC. There is a theoretical drop in quality (less bit depth) but only theoretical in all but the most extreme circumstances. OTOH I learned from a DIY amp designer that it is best to set your amp to the lowest gain setting, (the gain switch, not the volume knob--not all amps have variable gain settings) because gain controls the actual amplification level while the volume knob is attenuation after the fact. An amp generally gives the best performance at the lowest gain setting so it's better to run your power hungry cans at low gain and 3 o'clock volume than high gain at 9 o'clock volume.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Bloggs View Post

An amp generally gives the best performance at the lowest gain setting so it's better to run your power hungry cans at low gain and 3 o'clock volume than high gain at 9 o'clock volume.

Yeah, from the very basic knowledge I have in electronics, I'd assume the same, and that is how I'm running my amp.

Thanks for the reply!
post #11 of 11

I use Pure Music with iTunes. It makes iTunes sound better, plus you can use high-quality EQs and other plugins. I use the FabFilter Pro Q EQ, which sounds great, but there are others.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Computer Audio
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › PC as source, semi-noob question... iTunes EQ?