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post #31 of 42

Mgla - Groza

 

I'm not a fan of black metal in general but I love this album

Image result for mgla groza 


Edited by Sattelight - 2/24/15 at 1:59pm
post #32 of 42

The Fatima Mansions - North Atlantic Wind

 

One of the most overlooked bands around - you could pretty much pick anything from their back catalogue and call it a hidden gem, but this one's a real diamond.

 

post #33 of 42
Thread Starter 

 

 

Youtube sux man. Get the album... the whole thing just blows me away every time.

 

Edit: Whoops, this video at 720 ain't terrible.... no - I take that back. Get the album. *sigh*


Edited by NightFlight - 3/3/15 at 8:43pm
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

 

Comus: First Utterance

Freaky folk from the 70's--may take some mental adjustment to get the hang of it. Mostly goofy and disturbing, but occasional shots of real beauty and even some poppy moments.

 

 

Yes!

Without these guys and gals what has later been called Apocalyptic- or Neo-Folk, might not have been at all. So on that note: Curent 93 (last year's release, I Am The Last… interestingly shares some personnel with Comus)

Hard to pick just one album, but Thunder Perfect Mind is pretty emblematic.

 

post #35 of 42

Totally forgot about this thread, some truly great stuff in here. And yeah, Current 93 (and related folk/industrial projects, like Nurse With Wound, Death in June, Coil, Time Machines, SPK, and NON) are very much worth checking out. I'd also nominate Thunder Perfect Mind as the ideal intro to their somewhat formidable discography, but depending upon the musical disposition of whomever I'm trying to convert to Current 93 fanboyism, I've occasionally had more luck with Of Ruine or Some Blazing Starre and Sleep Has His House. Anyways, here's what I've been listening to recently:

 

 

In the past couple of years Jason Lescalleet has become one of my favorite noise-makers, and his recent prolific release schedule has not dimmed the quality of his racket at all. If you like tape music, dig intricately textured improv, or just really appreciate the power of the drone, and Lescalleet isn't on your radar, you need to take some corrective steps. I think Songs About Nothing is a particularly fine entry point into his noise, plus the cheeky cover reference just makes me happy. For fans of: Graham Lambkin, Aaron Dilloway, Kevin Drumm, Ramleh, Yellow Swans, NON, Merzbow, Birchville Cat Motel, Prurient, Jason Crumer, Skullflower, Ground Zero, The Caretaker, Negativland, Pauline Oliveros, Nurse With Wound, etc.


Edited by metalsonata - 3/8/15 at 3:24pm
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Totally forgot about this thread, some truly great stuff in here. And yeah, Current 93 (and related folk/industrial projects, like Nurse With Wound, Death in June, Coil, Time Machines, SPK, and NON) are very much worth checking out. I'd also nominate Thunder Perfect Mind as the ideal intro to their somewhat formidable discography, but depending upon the musical disposition of whomever I'm trying to convert to Current 93 fanboyism, I've occasionally had more luck with Of Ruine or Some Blazing Starre and Sleep Has His House.

 

And Throbbing Gristle, Psychic TV, Monte Cazazza and a bunch of alternate constellations/collabs/solo stuff. Weird thing with that group of artists, I can't quite remember who I was introduced to first, but whoever it was, it didn't take long before I was swallowing them all whole, even Boyd Rice/NON. What a weird guy that is.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post

 

 

 

In the past couple of years Jason Lescalleet has become one of my favorite noise-makers, and his recent prolific release schedule has not dimmed the quality of his racket at all. If you like tape music, dig intricately textured improv, or just really appreciate the power of the drone, and Lescalleet isn't on your radar, you need to take some corrective steps. I think Songs About Nothing is a particularly fine entry point into his noise, plus the cheeky cover reference just makes me happy. For fans of: Graham Lambkin, Aaron Dilloway, Kevin Drumm, Ramleh, Yellow Swans, NON, Merzbow, Birchville Cat Motel, Prurient, Jason Crumer, Skullflower, Ground Zero, The Caretaker, Negativland, Pauline Oliveros, Nurse With Wound, etc.

 

 

I see you're a bit more advanced in matters of noise than me. :)
I had a period a while back when I was waist deep in Japanoise, particularly fascinated by Hanatarash, but it's been a little quiet since.

 

 

I think it's particularly fun with overlooked or forgotten albums made by more or less famous people.

Like Beauty In The Beast by Wendy Carlos, which is a weird and and wonderful collection of compositions demonstrating temperament/tuning and alternative scales.

 

*This album hasn't been in sale for a decade, so "alternative" methods are in order to procure it*


Edited by limpidglitch - 3/9/15 at 5:56am
post #37 of 42
Haha, the other weird thing with that group of artists is that I always forget several of them, even the really really important ones, like Throbbing Gristle. I'm not entirely sure which of them I was introduced to first, either; I suspect it was Throbbing Gristle or Nurse With Wound, the latter of which I know I discovered via Homotopy to Marie, which at the time I treated as sort of a novelty album. It was great fun to put a pair of headphones on an unsuspecting friend's head and see how they coped with it. However, I don't believe that I discovered Current 93 via the connections with this batch of artists--I think it actually came about because of Nick Cave's guest vocals on at least one of their albums, this being a time when I was eager to discover everything that Nick Cave had ever done. I discovered Comus in a similarly roundabout way, via Opeth. Funny how so many paths lead to the same destination.
 
The same Wendy Carlos who is responsible for the Clockwork Orange and Tron soundtracks? I shall have to listen!

 

Edit: Whoah, that was pretty damn nice. I'm going to have to track that album down and give it a full listen or three!


Edited by metalsonata - 3/8/15 at 9:54pm
post #38 of 42

Here's three tracks I NEVER grow tired of:

 

 

post #39 of 42

Dirt Poor Robins are amazing.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1m3XncKyL0

post #40 of 42

Brand New Day by Marcy Playground

 

Pretty much every Marcy Playground song was overshadowed by their 90's hit "Sex and Candy", which IMHO isn't half as good as this song.

 

 

Also, most overlooked artist is John Hiatt. Great songwriter, mostly unheard of now. Some of my favorites:

 

Perfectly Good Guitar (Making fun of rock stars who break their guitars)

 

Something Wild

 

post #41 of 42

post #42 of 42

Ween! Yes, they are truly underrated--not that they don't have a lot of passionate fans and not that they aren't practically a household name, but most people are quick to dismiss them as a joke band, and nothing could be further from the truth. White Pepper and Quebec are two of the finest rock albums of the early 2000s, and The Mollusk is an alt-prog masterstroke. Do they have a sense of humor and are they quick to take cheap shots for laughs? Yes--but each track is also an immaculate popcraft gem, and their humor masks their earnest songwriting and encourages complacency before loosing streams of melancholic bitterness possessed of spine-shivering potency just when you get comfortable with their off-kilter presentation. Ween is great, and if you've never listened to them or have heard only a few tracks, you need to go listen to an album or three of theirs from front to back. My personal favorites are the three I mentioned above. Of course, you could just also approach them like a joke band and be perfectly happy with that, as well.

 

And here's another hidden gem for you all: Mary O'Hara. Some of you are familiar with her name--Passion Pit prominently sampled one of her tracks for their inescapable single Sleepyhead. But if you have a fondness for Celtic folk she's got a heck of a discography for you to check out. My favorite album of hers is Songs of Ireland (1958). Just her and her harp--comparisons to Joanna Newsom are apt. O'Hara possesses a unique voice as well, though it's not quite the acquired taste that Newsom's is. On the whole the album is rather silly and bright, but her forays into sadder territory hit all the harder for the surrounding lightness, and her craft completely lacks the new-agey smarminess and sheen that would pollute otherwise fine Celtic-themed folk in future decades (looking at you, Clannad). She sings in Irish on a few tracks as well, with predictably beautiful results. 

 

 

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