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Compensating hearing with the use of a graphic equalizer.

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

So I did a Google search and discovered a website that allows one to test their hearing. I tested mine at -12dB and came up with this result.

 

Now I know this is not clinically or even officially accurate. Though I wish there was a way to test stereo hearing (for both ears). I did read here on Head-Fi that some have compensated their hearing with graphic equalizers. I wanted to know how does one go about doing that accurately? I tried to do so using the graphic equalizer DSP in Foobar2000, not sure how accurate this is. It does indeed sound a bit different then what I normally hear.

 

 

Any assistance would be appreciated.

 

Destroysall


Edited by Destroysall - 1/29/13 at 12:03am
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post

So I did a Google search and discovered a website that allows one to test their hearing. I tested mine at -12dB and came up with this result.



Now I know this is not clinically or even officially accurate. Though I wish there was a way to test stereo hearing (for both ears). I did read here on Head-Fi that some have compensated their hearing with graphic equalizers. I wanted to know how does one go about doing that accurately? I tried to do so using the graphic equalizer DSP in Foobar2000, not sure how accurate this is. It does indeed sound a bit different then what I normally hear.




Any assistance would be appreciated.

Destroysall

The obvious problems here are that your test equipment is not calibrated so the results of your test include equipment deficiencies too, which can be very significant.

The not-so-obvious problem is that your built-in reference for natural sound is your own unassisted hearing. Unless you have a significant hearing impairment, "life" will be what you compare to, and correcting for your "measured" hearing will result in something very different from "life". If you suffer hearing impairment, this is a completely different problem, though, and should be addressed by a professional with the right equipment.
post #3 of 8

So...anybody here who is a Hearing doc? Be interesting to test this out.
 

post #4 of 8

You're equalizing for equal loudness there, not just hearing loss. It is normal that a 10 kHz tone isn't perceived as loud as a 1 kHz tone, don't counter that with an EQ. (see equal loudness curves)

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

I did check out the Fletcher-Munson Curve, and I guess my issue is that my right ear seems to hear much less than my left ear. I wanted to know if there is any alternative for equal loudness and how it is I would go about doing that?

post #6 of 8
The only responsible advise is to encourage you to see a hearing professional. Do not attempt self diagnosis and treatment based on the unqualified opinions of an Internet forum.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post

I did check out the Fletcher-Munson Curve, and I guess my issue is that my right ear seems to hear much less than my left ear. I wanted to know if there is any alternative for equal loudness and how it is I would go about doing that?

 

As someone stated before- if you try to correct from what you naturally hear, it will sound unnatural. A test told you this, but does it effect you in your daily life? Say for example one leg was shorter than the other and it had been this way your whole life. You learned to walk like this and you have no limp. Now you buy a pair of shoes that has some extra sole on it so your legs are of equal length, it won't feel right, it isn't what you are used to. Do you feel as though you have hearing issues?
 

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zmoney View Post

As someone stated before- if you try to correct from what you naturally hear, it will sound unnatural. A test told you this, but does it effect you in your daily life? Say for example one leg was shorter than the other and it had been this way your whole life. You learned to walk like this and you have no limp. Now you buy a pair of shoes that has some extra sole on it so your legs are of equal length, it won't feel right, it isn't what you are used to. Do you feel as though you have hearing issues?

 
Normally, no. Just when I listen to music, my right ear doesn't sound on par with my left ear.
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