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Computer Speakers $200-$250. - Page 2

post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by romeozdistress View Post

Sorry man. I am very new to this. Just trying to get some great quality on a budget. Whatever is better let me know.

Everyone has to start somewhere smily_headphones1.gif
post #17 of 36
Thread Starter 

Yeah. so whats the pros and cons of passive vs active?

post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by romeozdistress View Post

Yeah. so whats the pros and cons of passive vs active?

 

1. Potential clutter - passives require a separate amp so that's one more device, which matters more nearfield since you have a bunch of stuff on your desk; BUT if you use a T-Amp that's a smaller amp that can be easily positioned, leaving you with nothing but the cables to really worry about; if you use a conventional discrete speaker amp and the case doesn't double as heatsink and is sturdy enough, you can put your computer monitor over it.

 

On the flip side, professional-grade, symmetrical active monitors* will require two power cables and for the interconnect to run from your source to separate speakers.

 

 

2. Volume control - with a passive speaker you can position the amp within reach. Professional active monitors have gain controls on the rear, so it's not easy to reach; some consumer/audiophile monitors put the volume control on the front (Audioengine A5+) or the side (Swan D1080xxxx). The latter has the right as the master monitor, but I put it on the left so it's easier to reach, then just reversed the RCA inputs.

 

 

3. Matching the speakers to amplifiers - You can much more easily assume the manufacturer voiced the speakers using the amp they put inside the active monitor. With passives, the upside is you can pick an amp that you prefer (more power or headroom, or tubes if you prefer the coloration, etc).

 

 

 

*the ones with amps on both speaker cabinets, instead of one active speaker with a slave (passive speaker)

post #19 of 36
Well, that's like asking which is better: Mac or PC. (lol) More than I think any one person can cover easily; best to google it and read lots of discussion.

And there are really three different designations, not two: passive speakers, studio monitors, and desktop multimedia speakers.
post #20 of 36

I'm totally new to this. I have looked at the Audioengine A5+ and Bose companion 5. But from what I've read from this thread I should get an amplifier and a pair of speakers separately to get most bang for the buck. I have  a slightly higher budget; 4-500$. Does anyone have any tips for me what to look for?

post #21 of 36
If you have a room for a full size receiver, I'd go with the Denon 1312 that is factory refurbished/factory warrantied at accessories4less (research them, and you'll find they are a good vendor). Has a built in DAC (run optical or HDMI from your computer and bypass your onboard sound), you can expand it later to add additional speakers up to 5.1, has bass management for setting the crossover between the speakers and the sub, a remote control, and HDMI input and HDMI output if you ever decide you want to use it with a TV and connect up other devices (Xbox, PS3, bluray player). In other words, it's something you'll find a use for even if you decide to upgrade your desktop system to something different in the future.

Or is that too big?
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

If you have a room for a full size receiver, I'd go with the Denon 1312 that is factory refurbished/factory warrantied at accessories4less (research them, and you'll find they are a good vendor). Has a built in DAC (run optical or HDMI from your computer and bypass your onboard sound), you can expand it later to add additional speakers up to 5.1, has bass management for setting the crossover between the speakers and the sub, a remote control, and HDMI input and HDMI output if you ever decide you want to use it with a TV and connect up other devices (Xbox, PS3, bluray player). In other words, it's something you'll find a use for even if you decide to upgrade your desktop system to something different in the future.

Or is that too big?

 



Thank you very much for input!

I will have room for that amplifier, however, I would rather get a smaller one since I'm only planning to get 2.0, and possibly connecting a sub later on if I'm not satisfied with the sound. Could you recommend any speakers which will work nicely together with that amp?

 

I looked at the amplifier which was recommended earlier in this thread (lepai 2020). Is there a possibility to connect a sub to that one too?

 

Regarding the Lepai 2020, is it common to use those kinds of connectors for the speakers on amplifiers?

Are there any other recommended amplifiers which are in between the Denon and the Lepai in size (and functions as well)?

post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parmesan View Post

Thank you very much for input!
I will have room for that amplifier, however, I would rather get a smaller one since I'm only planning to get 2.0, and possibly connecting a sub later on if I'm not satisfied with the sound. Could you recommend any speakers which will work nicely together with that amp?

Well, the Denon can probably reach about 120 watts per channel into 8 ohms (and higher for 6 ohm speakers) when running 2.0. There are t-amps like the Lepai that put out more power than the Lepai 2020 for around $100 by Dayton and Topping (check Amazon and Parts Express). Of course with any of those t-amps, you would want a DAC to improve over the motherboard sound. That's why in many regards, an entry level AV receiver is the best all around value once you get up over $100, particularly if you want to add a sub since it has bass management that lets you choose the crossover for speakers/sub instead of having to go with where the speakers' natural roll off is.
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


Well, the Denon can probably reach about 120 watts per channel into 8 ohms (and higher for 6 ohm speakers) when running 2.0. There are t-amps like the Lepai that put out more power than the Lepai 2020 for around $100 by Dayton and Topping (check Amazon and Parts Express). Of course with any of those t-amps, you would want a DAC to improve over the motherboard sound. That's why in many regards, an entry level AV receiver is the best all around value once you get up over $100, particularly if you want to add a sub since it has bass management that lets you choose the crossover for speakers/sub instead of having to go with where the speakers' natural roll off is.

 

Alright, that sounds reasonable.
Also, I use a Mac. I looked at the back and there is a 3.5mm jack, USB 2.0 and FireWire 800. I guess I have to connect the amplifier to the 3.5 jack in order to make it work with best results, correct? Are there any other equipment I should consider when buying?

Lastly, do you have any recommendation for speakers, and possibly a sub?

post #25 of 36
Research your Mac. Some have optical out via the headphone jack. You have to spend just a few dollars on a little optical mini plug adapter. I'm not a Mac person, so I can't tell you which models.

For speakers, I like the Energy Veritas V5.2c while they are on closeout at $179 at wstereo (promo code VER52WW). It can be used as an LCR speaker. Lots of discussion over at the AVS forum Energy Owners Thread. I have the smaller V5.1s and the matching Energy VS Surrounds, they do sound great.

Ascend Acoutics CBM-170 SE are excellent speakers from an Internet direct company.

Other brand to look into is ARX A1 Monitors.
post #26 of 36

I found out it has optical in and out. I never realized it had those options available!

Since I don't live in the US makes it harder for me to get those specific items you listed which is sad. The shipping cost will possibly be quite high if I order the items from overseas.

I will have to see what is available as used items on the internet here and figure something out.

I really appreciate for your time and for helping me out!


Edited by Parmesan - 1/25/13 at 12:02pm
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parmesan View Post

I found out it has optical in and out. I never realized it had those options available!
Since I don't live in the US makes it harder for me to get those specific items you listed which is sad. The shipping cost will possibly be quite high if I order the items from overseas.
I will have to see what is available as used items on the internet here and figure something out.
I really appreciate for your time and for helping me out!

Where do you live?
post #28 of 36
Thread Starter 

thanks for jacking my thread. awesome bro.

post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

And there are really three different designations, not two: passive speakers, studio monitors, and desktop multimedia speakers.

 

Also that some 'desktop multimedia speakers' nowadays have a lot more in common with studio monitors (parts and construction) than Creative/Logitech 2.1 speakers. They're essentially compact hi-fi standmounts, with amps mounted on one or both and operationally are used desktop with a computer-based music system (or with some kind of mobile player or multi-porpose device) than on stands in a dedicated listening area.

post #30 of 36

I have a really badass used electronics shop near me and would seriously shop for head-fi users looking for an amp and speakers. It would mean trusting me with your budget but I'd give information for insurance

 

Also pictures before purchase and phone consultation


Edited by BLACKENEDPLAGUE - 1/25/13 at 8:16pm
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