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Ears hurt from listening even at low volumes - Page 2

post #16 of 20

I recently started eating Swiss chard, as it is a low calorie excellent source of magnesium. I also eat sunflower seeds every day, and eat other nuts and seeds often. Swiss chard is not only high in magnesium, but also high in vitamins K, A(carotene),  C, and other nutrients. 

 

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=75

 

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=16


Edited by JK1 - 1/10/16 at 6:06pm
post #17 of 20

There has been around 500 views of this thread since I first posted about magnesium, however no one else seems to want to comment. I wonder why. Are many embarrassed about what they eat? For many years I ate a poor diet that was lacking in vegetables and lacking in nuts and seeds, until I read about the large amounts of minerals and vitamins these have.

 

It was only in the past two years though that I started to seriously think about vitamin D. Since(theoretically at least) someone could get all the vitamin D they need from the sun, most people haven't even thought about taking vitamin D supplements. Those in northern areas though don't get that much in the way of strong sunlight containing plenty of UVB, and wear plenty of clothing when outdoors most of the year. Those in the north who have dark skin are particularly at risk for vitamin D deficiency. It might take someone with very dark skin up to 7 times as long to generate the same amount of vitamin D from the sun as someone with light skin. 

 

I guess another issue is that the mainstream press has convinced many to take in plenty of calcium, but hasn't mentioned anything about magnesium. 

The irony is that taking in plenty of calcium when someone is magnesium deficient may lead to bone loss, as the body needs to maintain a balance between calcium and magnesium. While my calcium intake hasn't been huge, it still probably was around 1200 mg a day. Even with my magnesium intake averaging something like 850 mg a day, I decided that I need to decrease my calcium intake to perhaps the 800 to 1000mg a day range.  I decided to stick with Swiss chard instead of also eating spinach, as spinach has much more calcium. 

 

www.nutritionalmagnesium.org

 

 

 

 

"With a low magnesium intake, calcium moves out of the bones to increase tissue levels, while a high magnesium intake causes calcium to move from the tissues into the bones. Thus high magnesium levels leads to bone mineralization."

 

" The fact is that increasing magnesium intake increases bones density[7] in the elderly and reduces the risk of osteoporosis. “Higher Magnesium intake through diet and supplements was positively associated with total-body bone mineral density (BMD) [8] in older white men and women."

 

"So they cannot get it through their heads that magnesium deficiency, not calcium deficiency, plays a key role in osteoporosis. "

 

http://drsircus.com/medicine/magnesium/calcium-magnesium-balance

 

 

http://www.mgwater.com/calmagab.shtml

 

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/what-is-vitamin-d/


Edited by JK1 - 1/9/16 at 7:28pm
post #18 of 20
I have been eating pepitas and magnesium supplements along with Gaba sine first reading about them here. Thank you!!!!

No perceptible difference, so far, but I am patient.


I have an appointment with my general practitioner for a physical exam on Thursday and will be sure to ask him to look for an ear infection or fungus that could be the source of the high pitch in my head. I will get a referral to an audiologist the subsequent week.

If I am able to get back into headphones again I wonder if I need to discontinue my quest for Non sibilant treble, I dumped the KRK's years ago NAD HP50 or Senn 650 in my future ?

The laid-back approach, AFAICT, and I could be mistaken is not so great for Classic Rock... Too distant of a sound for me.
Edited by Angular Mo - 1/11/16 at 5:30am
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angular Mo View Post

I have been eating pepitas and magnesium supplements along with Gaba sine first reading about them here. Thank you!!!!

No perceptible difference, so far, but I am patient.


I have an appointment with my general practitioner for a physical exam on Thursday and will be sure to ask him to look for an ear infection or fungus that could be the source of the high pitch in my head. I will get a referral to an audiologist the subsequent week.

If I am able to get back into headphones again I wonder if I need to discontinue my quest for Non sibilant treble, I dumped the KRK's years ago NAD HP50 or Senn 650 in my future ?

The laid-back approach, AFAICT, and I could be mistaken is not so great for Classic Rock... Too distant of a sound for me.

Even with all my magnesium intake, I am still a bit treble sensitive. Not that bad, however certain bright headphones with certain recordings high in treble will hurt my ears.

I think I need to further reduce my calcium intake. I have been adding up my calcium intake, and it seems some days I do exceed 1,200 mg by a fair amount, which is not good. I eat fat free plain yogurt every day. This has around 350mg to 400 mg of calcium in an 8 ounce serving. I recently switched to the Chobani Greek yogurt, and reduced my intake to around 5.3 ounces a day. The 5.3 ounces of Chobani has 15 grams of protein vs 10 grams for 8 ounces of regular fat free yogurt. The 5.3 ounces of Chobani has only 150mg of calcium. I need to figure out other ways to reduce my calcium intake without affecting the rest of my diet that much. 

post #20 of 20

Another article about how excessive calcium intake causes osteoporosis.

 

http://www.4.waisays.com/ExcessiveCalcium.htm

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