Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › mp3 burn in
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

mp3 burn in

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Does MP3 player needs burn in?

Or is it reserved for higher grade audiophile mp3 player?

Because I read somewhere in the internet forum that the user/spokesperson said some particular mp3 player needs burn in to sound better, eg. to tame down the bass and treble.

 

What's the science behind?

post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 

I hope I'm in the right forum where discussions are allowed.

I'm scared of banhammer >_< But just too eager to know the science behind every claim.

post #3 of 9

I don't believe there's any real science behind that claim.

 

 

If it's a spokesperson of an MP3 player making that claim, I would really be skeptical of their products. It sounds to me like they want people's return policy to expire before they make a decision whether they want to keep it or not.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

That reasoning I read before too. About the returning policy.

 

Well, it's a neverending conspiracy, isn't it? Frankly, I am yet to encounter a manufacturer (headphones or accessories) claiming burn in helps. The closest is (i may be misquoting) Jen Meier saying it's advisable to leave the headphone to break in for 48 hours.

post #5 of 9

In electronics: Burn-in is the process by which components of a system are exercised prior to being placed in service (and often, prior to the system being completely assembled from those components). The intention is to detect those particular components that would fail as a result of the initial, high-failure rate portion of the bathtub curve of component reliability

 

For audiophiles: Burn-in, is the process of leaving audio equipment turned on for multiple hours, to get the components to achieve optimal performance. 

 

It's not the same.

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by autumnholy View Post

That reasoning I read before too. About the returning policy.

 

Well, it's a neverending conspiracy, isn't it? Frankly, I am yet to encounter a manufacturer (headphones or accessories) claiming burn in helps. The closest is (i may be misquoting) Jen Meier saying it's advisable to leave the headphone to break in for 48 hours.

 

 

 

I'm pretty sure I've heard NuForce reps recommend burn-in in the comments of some negative Amazon reviews of their IEMs, but I'll have to fact check that. Cardas recommends burning in their cables as well.

 

It does sound like a conspiracy, yeah. The manufacturer's could very well just be following the trend themselves and have no bad intentions when making claims about burn-in. But since there isn't really any legitimate science behind it for something like an MP3 player that would be the first thing that comes to mind(IF it's the manufacturer making the claim, I thought that's what you meant by spokesperson).

post #7 of 9

Its just a way to trick the listener into getting used to the sound. More like the ears burned in.

post #8 of 9

I believe in burn in for speakers/headphones as I have experienced this myself.

 

For electronics with solid state circuits, and capacitors etc, I can't see why burn in would occur. Nothing is changing over time.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by squallkiercosa View Post

In electronics: Burn-in is the process by which components of a system are exercised prior to being placed in service (and often, prior to the system being completely assembled from those components). The intention is to detect those particular components that would fail as a result of the initial, high-failure rate portion of the bathtub curve of component reliability

 

For audiophiles: Burn-in, is the process of leaving audio equipment turned on for multiple hours, to get the components to achieve optimal performance. 

 

It's not the same.

 

THANK YOU.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sound Science
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › mp3 burn in