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The Accudio app by golden ears, a headphone revolution. - Page 5

post #61 of 193
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rixlplyx View Post

Finally! Something that makes Beats by Dre sound halfway decent.basshead.gif

the ultimate testament to this app!! ha!

post #62 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rixlplyx View Post

Finally! Something that makes Beats by Dre sound halfway decent.basshead.gif

 

But what's the point of buying $300 enhanced bass headphones just to remove the bass? L3000.gif

post #63 of 193

wish they bring gapless in near future. The UI is no where as good as apples one however their reference EQ feature does work well on my XBA-4 and k702. 

post #64 of 193

Accidentally found this app. If I found this app earlier maybe I can save a money for not buying clip zip for my FLAC collection.

 

Just playing around a bit, for some genre/songs I still prefer the normal preset/EQ. 

 

One question though, anybody can verified the accuracy of the headphone simulation (T1, HD650, LCD-2, etc..)?

If it does, this app would be helpful before buying new headphone. Just like audition those headphones on the shop before buying it.

 

Anyway I will buy the app anyway to get rid the annoying adv.

post #65 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by kupleh View Post

Accidentally found this app. If I found this app earlier maybe I can save a money for not buying clip zip for my FLAC collection.

 

Just playing around a bit, for some genre/songs I still prefer the normal preset/EQ. 

 

One question though, anybody can verified the accuracy of the headphone simulation (T1, HD650, LCD-2, etc..)?

If it does, this app would be helpful before buying new headphone. Just like audition those headphones on the shop before buying it.

 

Anyway I will buy the app anyway to get rid the annoying adv.

 

I don't know about absolute accuracy but my HD600 sounds a lot like a slightly congested HD800 when I apply the HiFi profile. Set it to simulate the HD800, and it gets a little bit of a treble peak, but I myself don't really notice that with the HD800 (one possibility is that the HD800 fits me better than how it fit the equipment and the people who get fatigued on it).

post #66 of 193
Thread Starter 

the headphone simulation is only going to be able to perform relative to the quality/capability of your headphones.

post #67 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 

I don't know about absolute accuracy but my HD600 sounds a lot like a slightly congested HD800 when I apply the HiFi profile. Set it to simulate the HD800, and it gets a little bit of a treble peak, but I myself don't really notice that with the HD800 (one possibility is that the HD800 fits me better than how it fit the equipment and the people who get fatigued on it).

 

Hhmmm.. how is that HD600 perform with HD800 simulation in general if I may know?

I know its impossible to get 100% accurate but if it can give you a bit SQ preview in the right way it would be helpful.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Br777 View Post

the headphone simulation is only going to be able to perform relative to the quality/capability of your headphones.

 

Ah, you are absolutely right. How I can forget about this most critical thing.

Hopefully my DT1350 capable to deliver the a bit preview of sound of its upper class headphone.

post #68 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by kupleh View Post

 

Hhmmm.. how is that HD600 perform with HD800 simulation in general if I may know?

I know its impossible to get 100% accurate but if it can give you a bit SQ preview in the right way it would be helpful.

 

Thing is I only tried it out for kicks, but here's the thing - even if by a microphone's measurements you could apply an EQ curve (even one more complex than Accudio's) to get the HD600 to mimic the response of the HD800 on a sine wave, there are a few problems for getting the overall sound:

1) Chassis design - the HD800 has different density earpads, but more important, its chassis places the drivers forward of the ears and at an angle. Applying only EQ to the HD600 to try to mimic this is kind of like taking measurements of a Focal Stella Utopia in a large room with proper toe-in and a Chorus 714 in a small room without proper toe-in, then applying an EQ to the latter - they still won't sound the same. Of course you can just experiment with the toe-in on the 714's, but obviously you can't put enough of an angle on the HD600's drivers. (Similarly, I've seen people wonder why the same speakers in their cars that they didn't bother to custom install properly don't sound like the other guy's system no matter how much EQ tweaking he does, even if verified by a USB Microphone on sine waves)

 

2) Driver design, such as mass, surround excursion, efficiency, etc - Here's another problem - a sine wave isn't the same as music, it's a good measuring tool but no music sounds like that, right? So even if you can, on a sine wave, make the two sound identical, on music the HD600 might not only lack the driver toe-in angle, but it might also have more mass, so it doesn't sound as "fast" - it might relatively have longer decay than the HD800, or conversely, some may think the decay on notes on the HD800 happens too fast. Plus, the efficiency and load complexity of the drivers mean that an HD600 regardless of the EQ curve has drivers moving that way as your given amplifier can make it move. In other words, your amp is still driving an HD600, and simulating an AKG K701 for example does not mean the same amp you used it on even if it wasn't coloring the sound might actually have problems driving lower efficiency, 56ohm drivers.

 

In short, the best a headphone simulation on there will do is give you a hint if you might like a certain headphone, in the way that some people may like a Grado in general but not Sennheisers or AKGs. So given what I understand in theory, I didn't really give much credence to it aside from "let's see what happens."

post #69 of 193

All it will change will be it's frequency response to mimic that of the other headphone. All distortion/ringing problems of your headphone will remain.

post #70 of 193

The way that I see it in simple manner.

What the mic get is the final output (regardless the chasis/pad/material/angle) produce by a headphone and also if the mic put in the mannequin to get the best result possible to mimic our ear. Then if you have 2 output data from headphone A and headphone B then use an EQ to make the headphone A to come close (in term of the output) to headphone B.

If they done it right would it be simulate (at least a bit) the output data of headphone B from the headphone A as long as the headphone in the similar level.

Maybe it is not that simple because there are a lot of variables to consider beside the output data.

post #71 of 193

I only use it for the basic setting of pick the headphone you already have.

post #72 of 193

Had some money left on my iTunes account, so I went ahead and bought the paid version without reading through the thread (seemed interesting...)

Checked the options, no FitEar, am sad ):

Will try the other options soon, but for now the app seems really promising.

post #73 of 193

I tried the app and also spent some time on Golden Ears' website doing a lot of reading. While I appreciate the effort put into all the work that's been done, I don't really agree with the approach.

 

When listening to Accudio's reference corrections, it's very obvious that the results are way too bright/shrill. I think Golden Ears have a misguided point of view on how headphones are supposed to sound. They don't take into account the necessary -10 dB slope from 1KHz to 20KHz in order for headphones to sound neutral (due to the close proximity of the drivers to the ears and ear canal resonance). If you EQ to a flat line, the treble energy will be excessive. Anyone who's experienced with measuring/EQ'ing speakers and headphones should have discovered this after a while--its effects are not subtle at all. 

 

I suppose you can try and apply that -10 slope yourself, but if I was going to do that, I might as well just EQ the headphones myself--why bother with their measurements/corrections? Just use reliable measuring data from sites like InnerFidelity and you're good to go. And if you do it yourself, at least you can flatten out all the peaks and dips and get a truly neutral/accurate sound, whereas Accudio keeps some peaks and dips because they think it sounds better (which I don't really agree with in general. In most cases, you can flatten the peaks and dips without causing audible problems).

 

Anyway, so far, all the "automatic corrections" solutions I've tried had failed to produce usable results, including this one. They all make the mistake of not considering the -10 dB slope and the results are always too bright/shrill/fatiguing. 


Edited by Lunatique - 4/8/13 at 11:27pm
post #74 of 193
Thread Starter 

as usual, you've caused me to re-evaluate.  I definitely no longer feel their sound for the es-5 is as good as it could be.   I've already dont lots of experiments based on your advice and feel i have improved the sound. 

post #75 of 193

OK, so based on my understanding after downloading and paying $5 for this app, the purpose of this iPhone App is to simulate the sound signature of the headphone that we currently use against the one that we want / select from the preset.

 

Selecting the same model of IEM / Head Phone model with the one that we are using, can actually make the sound worst.

 

correct me if I'm wrong ?

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