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The Accudio app by golden ears, a headphone revolution. - Page 13

post #181 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francisk View Post

That's why I wished you luck that you won't run into the same problems like the rest of us wink.gif

 Yes, I get that you are dissatisfied with your experience.  I feel bad for you.  But that does not mean you have to get snarky with others.  Like I said, it works for me, it has since I installed it and paid my money, and I like what it does.  YMMV.

post #182 of 199
Please don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to be snarky Ableza. I'm glad it works for you. If you read carefully within this thread, quite a few users expressed their problems with Accudio Pro like me. It's good that you don't experience these problems but don't come around barking at us as though we're trying to create the problem. If you're happy with Accudio Pro then stay happy but that doesn't mean we can't express our frustration with our problems with Accudio Pro.

You've paid your money and you're happy with it....good for you. I've paid my money and I'm not happy...I express my views so that I can warn future customers to tread with caution.
Edited by Francisk - 4/12/14 at 12:25pm
post #183 of 199

I like this app with the FLAT Hi-Fi settings with my HD-598's. But, it have his faults: VERY buggy and outdated interface!

post #184 of 199
Not to mention that it hasn't received an update in ages and the they GoldenEars doesn't reply to emails.
post #185 of 199
Yes they really need to update the app.
post #186 of 199

I've decided to give this app another try. I'm confused by it's settings though. My JVC HA-S500 headphones aren't on the list. I chose the HA-S600 and selected the simulation mode Hi-Fi (Flat, Recommended). And then shaped the eq like this below. The eq shape is similar to my home system and the sound from Accudio is pretty close. Any more tips on how to operate this app? Thanks.

 

 

post #187 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by gambia View Post
 

I've decided to give this app another try. I'm confused by it's settings though. My JVC HA-S500 headphones aren't on the list. I chose the HA-S600 and selected the simulation mode Hi-Fi (Flat, Recommended). And then shaped the eq like this below. The eq shape is similar to my home system and the sound from Accudio is pretty close. Any more tips on how to operate this app? Thanks.

 

 

I recommend you searching how to EQ a pair of headphones properly if you want that, assuming your headphones aren't available on the list.

Accudio is generally a waste of time. It uses a generic EQ setting who is ''correct'' for someone in Golden Ears. Trust your ears instead of that.

 

EQu is a very good advanced equalizer for iOS. Try it and search the best sound for you and your headphones.

post #188 of 199
Quote:

Originally Posted by MarcadoStalker7 View Post

 

It uses a generic EQ setting who is ''correct'' for someone in Golden Ears. Trust your ears instead of that.

 

Actually, it's for "something," which is whatever mic and analyzer set-up is used (along with all upstream components up to the headphone). The problem with using just one's ears like that is that not everyone knows the proper timbre for all instruments much less for a specific recording (for example, as much as Marshall amps have a signature warm sound as well as some humbuckers, we have no idea what settings the amps were on) anyway, not to mention how (as any ENT can tell you) some people's ears don't actually have a very flat response, so someone with a mic and analyzer creating an EQ profile that can mitigate too wide or too tall peaks and valleys in the response is more reliable as far as current technology is concerned. In cases where one's ear's response isn't flat, you either use a corrective hearing aid, but since that is cost-prohibitive, you can start with the corrected EQ profile then reshape it given due consideration to where the peaks and valleys are in their own ears' response.

 

However it won't be that straightforward - just as some manufacturers make sure to match drivers in each headphone or earphone they sell, variances in ears' response can vary between both ears in the same person, and most EQ programs including Accudio don't have independent Left and Right channel EQ settings, unlike for example some Pioneer or other brands' car audio receivers (although these were designed more for compensating in case a car cabin can introduce such variances). Then there's the problem with his specific headphone/IEM not included in Accudio's profiles.

 

In any case, the thing is without having one's own mic and RTA set-up, at the very least do not treat with suspicion the results by someone who does, although of course given the circumstances that is the only way he can experiment with the EQ. You can see a lot of this same logic in society and it causes a lot of problems, however I cannot elaborate as such discussion will drift off topic and even though it can be considered relevant such topics are verboten in this forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gambia View Post
 

I've decided to give this app another try. I'm confused by it's settings though. My JVC HA-S500 headphones aren't on the list. I chose the HA-S600 and selected the simulation mode Hi-Fi (Flat, Recommended). And then shaped the eq like this below. The eq shape is similar to my home system and the sound from Accudio is pretty close. Any more tips on how to operate this app? Thanks.

 

 

 

Did you try other sites like headphone.com? You can also google "response graph (your headphone/IEM)" and you might find something you can start with. In some cases they might vary between sites as well as from what you'd expect to hear looking at the graph because some people just stick a mic between the headphone on a hanger, which doesn't take into account ear pad compression (which will vary depending on how people wear theirs) and if the ear canal affects the sound (like if yours are too narrow; again, only an ENT or audiologist can figure this part out). Ideally one must use a ballistics dummy head with an average ear canal leading to a mic inside the head, but of course even without that it won't mean that such graphs are absolutely useless.

What I did using NeutronMP on my Android is I looked up the response graph of my headphones, then instead of really trying to make it absolutely flat, I just minimized its peaks and dips. Google "how to EQ" so you can understand how the individual settings affects the sound, like how Q factor settings can determine how wide the effect will be from the selected "center" frequency (it's called that because above and below that the sound will be affected as well). Usually, pick the link that leads to a tutorial posted on a car audio forum - it's usually detailed and yet relatively in lay man's terms (meaning you won't need to be an audio engineer to really understand it), as they have to rely on it to correct the effects of a car cabin that all other tweaks such as proper installation won't fix. EQ's aren't used as much in home audio thanks to how you can position the speakers and your seat properly while treating hte room with acoustic materials that isolate or dampen it. usually the best done in home entertainment is an HT receiver with a microphone that helps its auto-EQ tuning, like Audyssey MultiEQ on some Denon receivers (some aftermarket car audio receivers and processors have such a system too).


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 7/13/14 at 7:56am
post #189 of 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by theequalizer View Post
 

...A lot of headphones, including the Etymotics and the Shures, have a hump at between 2000 and 3000 Hz. That hump is based on the diffuse field theory of headphones...

 

...But if you would like to try an equalisation of etymotics according to what I've written above, then try these settings:

 

 

130Hz -3.5db q=2.8 bw=0.5

650Hz -4.5db q=2.8 bw=0.5

2900Hz -5db q=1.4 bw=1

 

Then adjust treble and bass according to taste. It's possibly the need for treble adjustment that is losing you 'air'. the dynamic nature of human hearing beaing what it is, treble and bass adjustment are not really optional.

 

It's worth doing these two also:

 

40Hz 3db q=1.4 bw=1, nicely lifts low bass to compensate for etmotics bass slope-off.

8500Hz -8db q=4.8 bw=0.3  -- this one is my ear canal resonance. Best to use a sine-sweep to find your own.

I tried the above settings (without the treble adjustment) and was positively surprised by the result. I also checked for my ear canal resonance, but was not able to detect any. I have read somewhere on this site that due to deep insertion the resonance should be around 13 kHz, which might explain why it didn't occur to me (I'm not the youngest). Are you sure you inserted them real deep (brain piercingly deep)? And did you use a certain type of tips or do these settings work regardless of tips? (I could try it myself, but am currently using my hf5 with Shure black olives, which are so hard to remove fro the stem.)

post #190 of 199
Quote:
"I tried the above settings (without the treble adjustment) and was positively surprised by the result. I also checked for my ear canal resonance, but was not able to detect any. I have read somewhere on this site that due to deep insertion the resonance should be around 13 kHz, which might explain why it didn't occur to me (I'm not the youngest). Are you sure you inserted them real deep (brain piercingly deep)? And did you use a certain type of tips or do these settings work regardless of tips? (I could try it myself, but am currently using my hf5 with Shure black olives, which are so hard to remove fro the stem.)"

 

Those were for the HF2 so should be right for the HF5 (apart from canal resonance, of course).

 

I am almost certain that at the time I was using the grey/large triple flange. I didn't have them buried that deep. I found that isolation seemed to  suffer and audio was (perhaps) slightly muffled when as deep as that. That maybe because I have a deviated ear canal (which Tyll Hertson also has; and whose articles alerted me to this possibility) on my right ear. I can tell this with some degree of certainty because ear plugs won't go deep on the right ear however much force I use; and tend to pop out by morning. So YMMV.

 

If I do go brain-deep then it rather feels like the first flange goes inside out and is a rather disconcerting feeling, then followed by a seeming loss of isolation/muffling. I haven't sine-swept this; maybe tomorrow. 13Khz is approaching my own limit as I'm well beyond my teens, and I can hear not much beyond 14Khz on any phones. But, yes, brain deep resonance may be significantly higher than 8.5Khz.

 

As for the 8500Hz hump: it's clearly audible to me, and it's as sharp and pronounced as I detailed.

 

It would appear, however, that I have the HF2s deeper in than these guys had their etymotics.

 

I remember that page from some time ago, but your post inspired me to find it again. Note that they also equalised out at about 3Khz and also 5db. I totally don't remember that detail and am thoroughly pleased with myself.

 

However, I must admit that I didn't spot the approx 3Khz hump until a post at innerfidelity detailed the passive vs diffuse field theory issue, and that etymotics had a hump of seemingly 12db at 3Khz according to innerfidelity 'grey' unadjusted frequency charts (ie, rather than the applied "head transfer" theory, coloured freuency line, which makes up their official result and which seems to accord to the etymotic's diffuse-field - wrong - theory). I tried  -12db and it was far too strong and eventually arrived at -5db; like that link.

 

It's still a wonder to me that I didn't spot the 3Khz hump when I first sine-swept the HF2. However, apart from subscribing to the O2 designer's 'expectation bias' theory, I have to say that piccolo's technique of using SineGen2 to manually (via the mouse) do this has not been as good for detecting humps for me as simple 'ticking' sweeps; where the sweep is a wav file which 'ticks' at specific frequency boundaries such as at 1Khz and then 2Khz, 3Khz, 4Khz etc, both fro finding humps AND their widths. I'll see if I can find the website that generates those wav files for your convenience tomorrow. (Warning: set a lower volume as sinesweeping is very high-intensity, generally rather protracted, and so may cause hearing damage; the crackling I got on one or two occasions still has me worried and I definitely have developed a mild case of tinnitus, only noticeable in near silence, though on only one ear so it's difficult to blame it on sinesweeping).

 

What I can tell you, as an interesting aside, is that the bass on the etymotics, with that equalisation I detailed, is delicate sounding compared to my equalised Superlux 681F (F for flat) full sized phones. Delicate and yet highly sensually pleasurable compared to the Superluxes, which is just, well, bass. Very much depends on the music, however. It's for me an extraordinary and unexpected finding. I've been trying to find a way to replicate the effect on the Superluxes, which have wonderful soundstange that the HF2s lack, with a stronger negative bass equalisation on them. Not worked so far; I just lose bass which was already weak. Accudio have a Superlux equalisation for the plain 681s (and maybe also also the 681Fs if memory serves). However my buddy has run off back home with his ipod so I don't know what it it at the present time. Maybe it'll give me that Etymotic delicate/pleasing bass.

post #191 of 199

Nice to hear from you! As some months have passed since your post, I did not know whether or not you would still follow the thread. Many thanks for your effort.

 

This is interesting stuff. My experience with the hf5 is that I have to insert them real deep and then some to achieve proper seal and clear treble reproduction. It hurt at the beginning, but now I can use the small transparent triple flange with the least discomfort. I am now trying to get used to the black olives, which put more pressure on my bones, but seem to sound just a little more balanced. Once I manage to enable my portable rig for parametric EQ, I might as well revert to the tri-flange. Until now I have only played with EQ on my computer, which I don't like to use as a music source, even when at home. Have to root my Android tablet or smartphone or both and install Viper, but am still hesitating. Or should I get an ipod and give Accudio a try?

 

Anyway, your settings work great and save me tons of work and frustration. So I can spend more time EQing my beyer T1. I'd appreciate a link to that wav file generating website, if you find it.

post #192 of 199

I get emailed alerts.

 

I found the link. It's here.

 

My personal preference to the parametric EQ business is a Clip zip (or plus) and rockbox firmware. It has a higher power amp than the iphone and according to the O2 designer it's hifi while also having an etymotics friendly output impedance of 0.5 , so no bass or treble issues. Accudio may have a preset that compensates for output impedance issues according to device (they all vary), but their website doesn't say. Clip Zip is likely preferable as the Clip+ has 3 issues that mean that you'll likely need a soldering iron. But at their price they are easily replaced.

post #193 of 199

Thanks for the link! Will check it out over the weekend with my T1. But with 1 kHz steps, how do you not miss a peak at, say 6.5 kHz?

 

Clip Zip ordered. But at some point I will need a solution for at home as well. That one will have to support streaming over WiFi in addition to parametric EQ, therefore Android or iOS based devices come to my mind. My current smartphone has an output impedance below 1 Ohm, so this should be no problem.

 

I would guess that Rockboxed Clip Zip with your EQ profile will make etymotic hf5 sound better (= neutral) than most summit-fi players ever could. But I'm not going to make the necessary investment to prove it. :eek:

post #194 of 199

I downloaded this app today mainly to use FLAC on my IPod Touch 4G.

After being more than pleased playing FLAC files and adding them from itunes. I discovered "simulation mode". Having a pair of Yamaha PRO500 in the apps list I dialed them in to replicate Shure SHR940 (which I also own). I was rather shocked how close they sound using this simple app.

Immediately my PRO500 veil was lifted in the mids, bass toned down to very much how I hear SHR940. The only object still present from my Yamaha's signature was a touch of their timbre which I gather partly comes from the driver material used.

Needless to say I think this app is amazing and all for just a few dollars. It lets me play FLAC and tinker around for hours experimenting with it's features.


Big recommendation from me. 

post #195 of 199

anyone can tell me how to eq audeze lcd 2 rev2 I like more slam in lower region and decrease the sharpness

 

I look for warm sound signature that is full rich and warm and nice basssss

 

i have chord hugo connected to iPod and have audeze lcd 2 rev2

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