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Emotiva Stealth DC-1 DAC - Page 28

post #406 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeithEmo View Post
 

 

Hi Keith, thanks for the heads up, apparently it's just my unit then...

post #407 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpEars View Post
 

 

Hi Keith, thanks for the heads up, apparently it's just my unit then...

Nope. There are couple of users on several forums that have had problems in one particular unit. Definitely more than 3. Some just return it rather than officially reporting it. I've followed this issue for the last year.

 

EDIT: one particular "channel"


Edited by Zoom25 - 8/13/14 at 10:02pm
post #408 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoom25 View Post
 

Nope. There are couple of users on several forums that have had problems in one particular unit. Definitely more than 3. Some just return it rather than officially reporting it. I've followed this issue for the last year.

 

Yep, same exact problem here so I returned it.

post #409 of 451

Unfortunately, if someone chooses NOT to tell us about it, then we can't fix it for them. :o

We have a thirty day return policy, and a fully transferable five year warranty, so there's really no reason NOT to report an issue. :cool:

 

DACs themselves are complex pieces of equipment, and the system of DAC plus drivers plus computer even more so, so returning one that "doesn't work" without sufficiently troubleshooting the issue at hand is a bit like returning a new camera you just bought because "it won't take pictures".....  There are a lot of reasons why a DAC might not be behaving the way it ought to... and the vast majority of them do turn out to be a simple matter of software configuration, or another equally trivial issue - so we're not going to assume a hardware problem is involved unless it's reported to us..

 

In general, most problems people have with DACs seem to be software related (usually involving getting the drivers installed and their player set up correctly), a handful involve compatibility with specific other equipment (noise or other issues that only seem to happen with certain sources or other equipment, or dropouts and funny noises that magically go away when they use a different USB cable or port, and that we can't find when we get the unit back here and test it with the equipment we have), and a few are caused by actual hardware problems.

 

If you do have a DC-1 that seems to be having this particular issue, then it's pretty easy to tell; specifically, the noise will be there when the ASRC is engaged ("asynch mode"), won't be there when it is bypassed ("synch mode"), and, most definitively, although it may be different at different sample rates, the noise will be similar or identical no matter which type of input you're using (it WON'T only happen with USB). Other than the subtle difference in sound created by the action of the ASRC itself, a DC-1 shouldn't otherwise ACT differently when the ASRC is engaged or disengaged.

 

Keith

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zoom25 View Post
 

Nope. There are couple of users on several forums that have had problems in one particular unit. Definitely more than 3. Some just return it rather than officially reporting it. I've followed this issue for the last year.

 

EDIT: one particular "channel"


Edited by KeithEmo - 8/14/14 at 6:39am
post #410 of 451

Should the DC-1 be connected to power through a surge protector or does it have built-in protection like the Emotiva amplifiers have?

 

I'm wondering, what would be the best way to connect my devices to power? I have a DC-1, mini-X amp, and music server (PC) that all need hooking up in the same vicinity. Should I have the DC-1 and PC connected to a surge protector and leave the mini-X plugged directly into a wall socket? Any suggestions here would be very much appreciated. 


Edited by gld3gld3 - 8/20/14 at 2:43pm
post #411 of 451
I plug everything to a surge. Haven't found a difference in terms of power or noise floor variance between wall or surge protector strip. Might as well keep everything safe plugged into surge.
post #412 of 451
No way "blows XDA2 out of the water" is applicable here. Had both for 3 weeks for direct comparison and at best the differences are subtle with ASRC engaged with quality source material. At current price of $219 emotiva direct. XDA2 represents an unbeatable value for any DAC. This also can be a preamp and headphone amp is just a bonus. Unless you are after some quest for infinitesimal SQ improvement or can spend money liberally there is no need to go beyond XDA2. Ofcourse the smaller form factor of DC1 and other DACs compared to full 1U rack size and 16" depth of the XDA2 is not for desktop applications.
post #413 of 451
As always, depends on how highly resolving the rest of your system is. In mine, the DC1 was a big upgrade to the XDA2, but agree that each is a terrific value.
post #414 of 451
Btw, I am also using a Emotiva CMX line filter and power conditioner to which all components including the XDA2 are coonected. Not sure how much this helps cleaning up electrical noise....thought will trhow this out there.
post #415 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dealzguy View Post

No way "blows XDA2 out of the water" is applicable here. Had both for 3 weeks for direct comparison and at best the differences are subtle with ASRC engaged with quality source material. At current price of $219 emotiva direct. XDA2 represents an unbeatable value for any DAC. This also can be a preamp and headphone amp is just a bonus. Unless you are after some quest for infinitesimal SQ improvement or can spend money liberally there is no need to go beyond XDA2. Ofcourse the smaller form factor of DC1 and other DACs compared to full 1U rack size and 16" depth of the XDA2 is not for desktop applications.

I will say, the HP amp in the DC-1 is WAY better than the one in the XDA-2.  Also, the analog input increases its flexibility dramatically.

post #416 of 451

You've got to be careful to distinguish between plain power strips, surge protectors, power filters, and other fancier stuff here.

 

A plain power strip is really just an extension cord. As long as it's heavy (which most except the pitifully cheap ones are), a plain power strip won't hurt anything at all (nor will it make any difference - any more than using a good heavy extension cord would.)

 

A surge protector is designed to block power surges - for example, from a nearby lightning strike or trouble at the power company. While they won't catch everything, and don't totally remove the surge, a surge suppressor does increase the level of protection you have. Since it also shouldn't hurt anything, they're also usually a good idea. (Some fancier surge suppressors do actually limit the current a bit, and they should be avoided for big power amps... but I wouldn't worry for the Mini-X.)

 

A NOISE FILTER, which is something that is included inside many surge suppressors, is designed to block specific types of noise from getting into your equipment from the line. If you hear little chortling noises during quiet spots in the music, and they seem to come and go when certain appliances are running, or at certain times of day, then a power filter MIGHT help. Again, most power filters you find in power strips won't hurt.

 

All of our equipment is reasonably immune to power surges and to line noise. (Contrary to popular belief, promoted by the people who sell noise filters, most well-designed equipment doesn't need one.) So, adding a surge suppressor shouldn't affect the sound. However, adding a good surge suppressor (made by someone reputable like APC or Belkin) will increase the chance that your equipment will survive if there's a lightning strike down the street.

 

Fancier stuff like power regenerators and those silly little gadgets that you plug into outlets are very unlikely to do anything measurable or useful for any well-designed equipment, and can actually limit or hurt performance by limiting the available power. (Under very specific circumstances, some of the really fancy expensive ones MAY help SOME equipment.... ).

 

However, for what you have, I would recommend either straight into the wall, or through a reputable surge suppresor....

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zoom25 View Post

I plug everything to a surge. Haven't found a difference in terms of power or noise floor variance between wall or surge protector strip. Might as well keep everything safe plugged into surge.
post #417 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeithEmo View Post

 




Thanks for the information Keith. This puts my mind at rest. I think I'll look for a reputable surge suppressor now...
post #418 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpEars View Post
 

I believe I have found the cause of the left channel buzz problem when using Asynchronous USB mode on the DC-1. It seems that if the playback device is set to any sample rate configuration other than 192 kHz, the buzz will be present. The higher the sample rate setting the less noticeable the buzz (e.g., 96 kHz almost no buzz, 44.1 kHz - very prominent buzz when playing audio material, regardless of its actual sample rate).

 

On Windows 7, you can use the following steps to change the sample rate and bit depth of the playback device:

 

1. Right click on the speaker icon in the system tray

2. Select playback devices from the menu

3. Right click on the device that matches the following description (this is the driver for the DC-1):

Speakers

USB2.0 High-Speed True HD Audio

4. Select Properties from the menu

5. On the Advanced Tab in the Default Format section, select the bit depth and sample rate you would like to experiment with.

6. You can use the Test button to the right of the sample rate/bit depth selection combo box to check for the left channel buzz.

7. Click on the OK button to confirm your selection.

 

If you choose any sample rate other than 192 kHz, there will most likely be a buzz present in the left channel. Please not that even when using Synchronous mode, you may have to manually set the sample rate to match the material being played if your player cannot do this for you (i.e., by using ASIO instead of MME and forcing the sample rate).

 

So, where does that leave us? Basically you have two options:

 

1. Use USB Synchronous mode (and possibly manually set the sample rate to match playback material for optimal fidelity, if your player cannot do this automatically)

2. Use USB Asynchronous mode with the sample rate set to 192 kHz, forcing up-conversion (This option makes asynchronous mode useless in my book).

 

I believe that the people who report not to be having any noise in their left channel when using USB Asynchronous mode, simply have their sample rate forced to 192 kHz in the playback device settings forcing up-conversion of all played material (and resulting in no buzz in their left channel).

 

I hope I have been of help...

 

P.S., I am uncertain if MACs or Linux are affected by this issue.

 

Dude, I finally got around to connecting my computer to DC-1 and force up sampling on every bit rate to 192 kHz….and it worked!

 

No more hum/buzz on the left channel. In Audirvana Plus, I went to custom and made my 44.1 kHz and 48 kHz tracks both upsample to 192 kHz. So every song in Asynch worked without the annoying buzz. Dead silent.

 

I haven't bothered comparing sound quality of native sample rates in Synch vs. up sampled 192 in Asynch.


Edited by Zoom25 - 9/6/14 at 8:47pm
post #419 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoom25 View Post
 

 

Dude, I finally got around to connecting my computer to DC-1 and force up sampling on every bit rate to 192 kHz….and it worked!

 

No more hum/buzz on the left channel. In Audirvana Plus, I went to custom and made my 44.1 kHz and 48 kHz tracks both upsample to 192 kHz. So every song in Asynch worked without the annoying buzz. Dead silent.

 

I haven't bothered comparing sound quality of native sample rates in Synch vs. up sampled 192 in Asynch.

This is quite interesting, I had loud hiss issue with Hugo when it was default at 16-44.1.  It went away when I set it to 24-192 like you did.  Isn't asynchronous mode in affect no matter the bit and rate?(I guess for DC-1 it's different)  Anyway, I wonder why this is the case.


Edited by SilverEars - 9/6/14 at 9:01pm
post #420 of 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverEars View Post
 

This is quite interesting, I had loud hiss issue with Hugo when it was default at 16-44.1.  It went away when I set it to 24-192 like you did.  Isn't asynchronous mode in affect no matter the bit and rate?(I guess for DC-1 it's different)  Anyway, I wonder why this is the case.

I have no idea how the DC-1 is running DC-1 in asynchronous vs. synchronous, specifically with our units. My Dangerous Source is asynchronous, but it just does it and without any problem. There aren't any options to mess around with. It just works; and quite beautifully at that.

 

I haven't tried up sampling my 44.1 to 88 and then 96 and then making my move up slowly to 192 to see if the hum gets less in increments. I just went all the way to strictly 192 and got done with it. I only tried my USB off computer in 192 in asynch and so far it works. I'll give PS3 or something else a shot if it can output at 192 or upsample to 192.

 

Anyways, I'd love to hear Emotiva's (Keith?) take on this. 2 units, both with one channel noise problem in Asynch mode, and it goes away when up sampling to 192.

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