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Headphone EQ Generator for Xonar Audio Center

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

This is my first post to the community and now spending countless hours researching the Beyerdynamic DT990's reviews on here I thought it was my time to provide an EQ generator for the Xonar Audio Center. The original idea came from ManuLM here; I would like to give them the credit, I've only expanded on the idea.

 

I've created a public spreadsheet for everyone to utilize. If you have any feedback or enhancement requests, please let me know. If you have any questions or not seeing the expected results, please post them here. The spreadsheet is located here.

 

Open up the spreadsheet and you will see cells in an orange color. Only edit these fields. Important: I've noticed for the changes I made to go into affect, you need to exit out of the Xonar Audio Center by going to your taskbar and right click, select exit. Then modify the cmicnfp.ini file. 

 
1. Replace "MyPresetEQ" in call A1 with whatever you want to call your preset EQ in the Xonar Audio Center.
2. Replace values B4-K4 (in orange) with which ever values you want to set the gain to. 10 means +10db gain for that frequency range denoted in line B2-K2. Values should be between 20 and -20...meaning +20dB gain/-20dB gain.
 
You will see the EQ chart change, depending on what you put in for your gain. I made this to easily show what kind of "EQ curve" I want. 
 
3. Line 32 has the absolute path of the file you will be pasting lines 33-43 into, at the end of the file. The file is called "cmicnfp.ini" and you should use notepad/wordpad to edit it. 

Here is a copy of my cmicnfp.ini file:
[CMI_EQ]
CustomerEQCount=1
CurrentEQMode=12
ComboSelectMode=0
ComboGain0=0
ComboGain1=0
ComboGain2=0
ComboGain3=0
ComboGain4=0
ComboGain5=0
ComboGain6=0
ComboGain7=0
ComboGain8=0
ComboGain9=0
EQITEMNAME0=MyPresetEQ
EQITEMNAME0_Data0=655360
EQITEMNAME0_Data1=393216
EQITEMNAME0_Data2=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data3=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data4=65536
EQITEMNAME0_Data5=65536
EQITEMNAME0_Data6=65536
EQITEMNAME0_Data7=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data8=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data9=-131072
 
If you want multiple EQs that you have created, the cmicnfp.ini file would look like the following. I've highlighted the parts where you would need to modify the file. You see that you would have to update CustomerEQCount=2 (or how ever many you want) and EQITEMNAME0 would increment to EQITEMNAME1...and so on. You can also use the selection under column M and switch the number from 0-10 (right now) to make it easier when you have multiple EQs to create.
 
[CMI_EQ]
CustomerEQCount=2
CurrentEQMode=12
ComboSelectMode=0
ComboGain0=0
ComboGain1=0
ComboGain2=0
ComboGain3=0
ComboGain4=0
ComboGain5=0
ComboGain6=0
ComboGain7=0
ComboGain8=0
ComboGain9=0
EQITEMNAME0=MyPresetEQ
EQITEMNAME0_Data0=655360
EQITEMNAME0_Data1=393216
EQITEMNAME0_Data2=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data3=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data4=65536
EQITEMNAME0_Data5=65536
EQITEMNAME0_Data6=65536
EQITEMNAME0_Data7=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data8=0
EQITEMNAME0_Data9=-131072
EQITEMNAME1=MyPresetEQ2
EQITEMNAME1_Data0=655360
EQITEMNAME1_Data1=393216
EQITEMNAME1_Data2=65536
EQITEMNAME1_Data3=65536
EQITEMNAME1_Data4=65536
EQITEMNAME1_Data5=65536
EQITEMNAME1_Data6=65536
EQITEMNAME1_Data7=65536
EQITEMNAME1_Data8=65536
EQITEMNAME1_Data9=-131072

Edited by cdd3068 - 2/1/13 at 5:00pm
post #2 of 15

One suggestion to improve it: you could add a line defining your headphones' frequency response curve and compensate that to the flatline first, then apply your desired EQ settings.

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thats a very good idea, thank you for the feedback. I will look to integrate that. 

post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantSounds View Post

One suggestion to improve it: you could add a line defining your headphones' frequency response curve and compensate that to the flatline first, then apply your desired EQ settings.

 

 

That's how I'm EQ'ing my headphones. It's the only proper way to do it. And when done properly, it can seriously totally change the sound of headphones.  I made my Sennheiser HD438 sound creepy close to DT880's.

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantSounds View Post

One suggestion to improve it: you could add a line defining your headphones' frequency response curve and compensate that to the flatline first, then apply your desired EQ settings.

Do you know where I could get data points for various headphones? Headphone.com only gives a graph without the actual data points. Any input would be helpful.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdd3068 View Post

Do you know where I could get data points for various headphones? Headphone.com only gives a graph without the actual data points. Any input would be helpful.

 

I extracted all the data from the graphs. If you can get within +/- 1 dB it will do: different samples of the same HP model have bigger variances anyway.

Probably not something you want to do for every headphone in the world, but for your own stock should be no problem.

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantSounds View Post

One suggestion to improve it: you could add a line defining your headphones' frequency response curve and compensate that to the flatline first, then apply your desired EQ settings.

2 part reason for replying. First to sub to this thread (since I'm not on my computer and can't hit the subscribe button)

Second is to ask how you would go about doing this? I'd love to know more about proper eq settings. I'm sure my eq is nowhere near optimal for either of my headphones.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by liquidzoo View Post
[..]
Second is to ask how you would go about doing this? I'd love to know more about proper eq settings. I'm sure my eq is nowhere near optimal for either of my headphones.

 

Let's explain it on the HE500 example.

You  need to note down all the frequency bands of your equalizer and read the corresponding dB values from the graph. Note that the frequency scale is logarithmic, so it may be hard to pick the exact reference points. But the vertical lines represent linear increments - this means that all the lines right of the label 10 represent 20, 30, 40, etc up to a 100. From then on it is 200, 300, 400 - etc up to a 1000. And so on.

For the example I'll use the in-built foobar equalizer frequencies and their response values. The data points we need are:

55 Hz    3.5 dB

77 Hz   3.5 dB

110 Hz   3 dB

156 Hz   2.5 dB

220 Hz   2.5 dB

311 Hz   2.5 dB

440 Hz   2 dB

622 Hz   1.5 dB

880 Hz   0 dB

1.2 kHz  -0.5 dB

1.8 kHz   -4 dB

2.5 kHz   -5 dB

3.5 kHz   -2.5 dB

5 kHz   -5 dB

7 kHz   -1.5 dB

10 kHz   0 dB

14 kHz   -10 dB

20 kHz   0 dB

 

Now if we want to convert this into the EQ values, we can just reverse the polarity of the dB values:

 

55 Hz    -3.5 dB

77 Hz   -3.5 dB

110 Hz   -3 dB

156 Hz   -2.5 dB

220 Hz   -2.5 dB

311 Hz   -2.5 dB

440 Hz   -2 dB

622 Hz   -1.5 dB

880 Hz   0 dB

1.2 kHz  0.5 dB

1.8 kHz   4 dB

2.5 kHz   5 dB

3.5 kHz   2.5 dB

5 kHz   5 dB

7 kHz   1.5 dB

10 kHz   0 dB

14 kHz   10 dB

20 kHz   0 dB

 

After you enter these corrections to the equalizer, don't forget to use [Auto Level] - this will shift all the eq points down, so that none of the values would result in clipping.

 

This way you will end up with your headphone frequency response being compensated to flat. This should be the starting point to add coloring, if required.

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantSounds View Post

 

I extracted all the data from the graphs. If you can get within +/- 1 dB it will do: different samples of the same HP model have bigger variances anyway.

Probably not something you want to do for every headphone in the world, but for your own stock should be no problem.

This is a bit harder than expected...problem being ASUS Xonar Audio Center EQ only supports 10 data points where as from Headphone.com I have 29 data points. I wish the software would support more than 10 data points so I can have better accuracy. 

 

I uploaded a new worksheet here.

 

Edit: I noticed you said you were using foobar...this would provide better accuracy when looking for flat line, however I'm looking to do this with Xonar Audio Center or maybe there is a system wide EQ that I could use that would override Xonar I could use that allows for more data points? I don't listen to everything in foobar.


Edited by cdd3068 - 2/2/13 at 9:30pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:

I noticed you said you were using foobar...this would provide better accuracy when looking for flat line, however I'm looking to do this with Xonar Audio Center or maybe there is a system wide EQ that I could use that would override Xonar I could use that allows for more data points? I don't listen to everything in foobar.

 

 

I just found one. This should do what you want.

post #11 of 15

Keep this going and if i think its noob proof or polished enough I'll start pushing it,and add it to the STX wiki

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WiR3D View Post

Keep this going and if i think its noob proof or polished enough I'll start pushing it,and add it to the STX wiki

Thanks for this. Appreciate the consideration!

 

Has anyone used my chart to help them create a graph? I haven't had any feedback or anyone post problems? Either everyone that may have used this found it to be useful or didn't use it at all? Anyone?

post #13 of 15

Subscribed. I would be very interested in correcting the U shaped frequency response of my FA-011

 

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by cdd3068 View Post

Thanks for this. Appreciate the consideration!

 

Has anyone used my chart to help them create a graph? I haven't had any feedback or anyone post problems? Either everyone that may have used this found it to be useful or didn't use it at all? Anyone?

 

 

Thanks for the thread.The 10 band EQ in Xonar STX is decent. I tried both the spread sheet. But, there is no difference as in the end only those 10 bands are utilized. Would be great if we could use this in EqualizerPro as PleasanSounds said. I just downloaded and going through it. 

 

 

One more important that we need to consider is the frequency sensitivity of our own ear canal. It varies with frequency and it could be as big as 20db difference on mid frequencies with the dummy head. 


Edited by matbhuvi - 2/5/13 at 7:34pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by matbhuvi View Post
[..]

One more important that we need to consider is the frequency sensitivity of our own ear canal. It varies with frequency and it could be as big as 20db difference on mid frequencies with the dummy head. 

 

That's why I suggested having a 2-part approach. The first part is hardware dependent and is intended to compensate the frequency response to a flat line. The second part is to take into account your own tonal preferences, which remain pretty much the same irrespective of the hardware used. That way when you change headphones or swap to speakers, you only need to replace the first part.

 

I have played with the EqualizerAPO yesterday and it is very capable, just I'm not too enthusiastic about using REW as the interface (nor editing text files for that matter). I'm thinking of creating my own GUI that would generate the config files - that should be pretty simple.

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by matbhuvi View Post

Subscribed. I would be very interested in correcting the U shaped frequency response of my FA-011

 

 


 

 

Thanks for the thread.The 10 band EQ in Xonar STX is decent. I tried both the spread sheet. But, there is no difference as in the end only those 10 bands are utilized. Would be great if we could use this in EqualizerPro as PleasanSounds said. I just downloaded and going through it. 

 

 

One more important that we need to consider is the frequency sensitivity of our own ear canal. It varies with frequency and it could be as big as 20db difference on mid frequencies with the dummy head. 

The first spreadsheet is the one that you want to focus on if you're looking to create your own custom EQ after determining the flat line. This is where I'm looking for feedback on the Google Spreadsheet I made. The second spreadsheet was my weak attempt in mapping my headphones freq response, my current EQ, and then compensated diff between the two. If you need help or I didn't explain something clear enough in my direction, please let me know so I can update them. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantSounds View Post

 

That's why I suggested having a 2-part approach. The first part is hardware dependent and is intended to compensate the frequency response to a flat line. The second part is to take into account your own tonal preferences, which remain pretty much the same irrespective of the hardware used. That way when you change headphones or swap to speakers, you only need to replace the first part.

 

I have played with the EqualizerAPO yesterday and it is very capable, just I'm not too enthusiastic about using REW as the interface (nor editing text files for that matter). I'm thinking of creating my own GUI that would generate the config files - that should be pretty simple.

 

Thanks for the heads up on EqualizerAPO...however testing this app with ASUS STX didn't work. I plugged directly into onboard audio and worked like a charm. *sigh* See the original thread you gave me before for my detailed response. 

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