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How to remove dust from stax lambda?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I picked up a set of stax lambdas and and srm1-mk2 inexpensively.  Since my last thread, I have had the amp restored (re-soldered and modified for pro bias).  My sr-30 sound clean.  My lambdas still have significant buzzing in the left channel at both frequency extremes.  There is also a constant squeal/buzz only in the left ear.  From what I read these symptoms can be the result of dust in the driver.  After searching and reading through hundreds of pages in the stax thread, I cannot find a good answer.

 

What I've gathered so far:

1. Don't use a vacuum or compressed air.

2. People claim to have opened them up and removed particles (primarily hairs) but never state what method was used.

 

I have let them charge for a couple days with no noticeable improvement.  The buzzes and squeals are annoying enough for me not to use them so at this point, I'm considering selling them as parts.  If the left driver is shot anyways, I may as well try to fix it.  

 

Thanks


Edited by Mzisman4 - 12/29/12 at 9:29am
post #2 of 13

You call it quits and give them to me for 50 bucks wink.gif

 

Juuuuuuuuuuuust kidding. 

 

When you get dust in them, you are pretty much screwed. Getting a hair or some type of particulate matter is one thing since your can get at them with some tape on a tooth pick or something that you can hold steady. Dust is a bit different considering it is a bit more difficult to pick up, and god forbid it ends up on the diaphragms because then you might as well get an air compressor and set it as low as possible and PREY that you don't tear the diaphragms.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the info.  Anyone have any luck opening up their lambda pros?

post #4 of 13

just wondering, does dust affect dynamic drivers as much as electrostatic drivers? are they this prone to tearing too?

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

just wondering, does dust affect dynamic drivers as much as electrostatic drivers? are they this prone to tearing too?

I don't know much about elctro stats but from what I know most dynamic drivers are plastic and heavy (compared to electrostats) you should be able to clean them with out any problems.  From what I know about electrostats the diaphragms are super thin "lighter than air" crazy thin materials that lead to electro stats sounding so amazing.   Cleaning dust off of a dynamic driver would be like taking your finger to the dust on the hood of your car while cleaning the electrostats is like trying to get the dust off of stacked cards.

post #6 of 13

ask here

 

Dedicated STAX thread http://www.head-fi.org/t/223263/the-stax-thread-new in the High End Audio section

also another worth trying same section  http://www.head-fi.org/t/588716/vintage-stax-repair-and-maintenance

 

from what I recall a very fine brush , but don't quote me on that one, hope mine never get this issue.

 

best of luck.

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mzisman4 View Post

Thanks for the info.  Anyone have any luck opening up their lambda pros?

To answer this and other questions. You have to understand that even if you do get them open, getting dust off is extremely difficult. This is why people store them in plastic bags or in special cases.  

 

The driver is essentially two thin plates of conductive metal (usually copper) that have a bunch of holes in it so the sound can pass through. In between these two metal plates, you have a disk of 1-3 micron (yes......micron) mylar film. The idea is that when you pass an electrical current across the metal plate, you can cause static cling between the plate and the film. This causes the film to move like a diaphragm in a dynamic driver. The difference is that the film moves a LOT less than the diaphragm of dynamic driver while still producing the same amount of volume and sound which means that the sound is not as harsh on your ears which makes it a LOT easier to listen to. It is also far easier to control than dynamic drivers so there is incredibly little distortion compared to dynamic drivers. Hopefully that answers some of your questions.  

 

Getting dust off without destroying that film of mylar is difficult for ever a brain surgeon, not to mention that you might not even be able to get to it because the two metal plates are in the way. This is why when people gets dust on their headphones, they just buy new ones. If there is a person who knows a trick or two, it would be the people in the stax thread in the high end audio forum. The other source would be in the DIY forum in the diy electrostats thread. They would probably be the best help for this. I know there are special products for this, but idk. That stax thread in particular can help you open up your lambdas though. 

 

Linglingjr has no concept of electrostats because if you treat them like dynamic headphones, you will have wasted about 200-900 dollars depending on which lambdas you bought. 

post #8 of 13
The "technical tap" is the general suggestion when dealing with Koss ESPs - this is not a long-term solution, and unlike the modern ESP, you can't exactly ship those back to STAX for refurbishment for ~$10. redface.gif

Go with nick's advice - check in the STAX threads.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tjj226 Angel View Post

Linglingjr has no concept of electrostats because if you treat them like dynamic headphones, you will have wasted about 200-900 dollars depending on which lambdas you bought. 

 Remeber me saying "I don't know much about elctro stats"?  No where did I say to treat them like dynamic headphones... How'd you come up with that?

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for help.  I've posted in both of the suggested threads.

post #11 of 13

I wonder how this went?

post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 

Headphones are still in the same condition.  I re-soldered the connections to one channel and it helped with some of the issues (mostly the intermittent connection).  The static is still there and it does not seem like much can be done. 

post #13 of 13

Too bad. If 'stats just didn't have these kind of problems :mad:

 

I am having issues with my lambdas.. maybe a hair/dust in the driver, who knows.. kinda found out that you can't really do too much about it.

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