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Do certain clothes alter sound quality? - Page 3

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selenium View Post

He isn't talking about driver flex either.

 

You know what, fine.  You tell him exactly what's wrong, and exactly how to fix it.  I'm out of here.  I don't need people like you mocking every move I make.  

 

OP, I hope you get your problem fixed, but this guy is ticking me off.  

post #32 of 48
Thread Starter 

No worries, thanks for the assistance.

 

post #33 of 48
He isn't talking about driver flex though! Yeah, the driver flexes at the exact moment when the cable runs across his shorts. Makes sense.

I have no solution for you, OP. My EX1000 and FX700 have also been prone to static electricity, so I dont think its an issue of throwing more money at it. Maybe try all-plastic housings?
post #34 of 48
...
Edited by Selenium - 12/24/12 at 8:08pm
post #35 of 48
Quote:

Now we have to find the source of this electric buildup.  Where do you think it's coming from.  We can't solve the problem without that information.  You can't say it's static electricity without that information either. 

Pockets as a whole in sports shorts/pants are usually made up of 3 total layers: pocket inner, pocket outer, and pants. 3 layer is plenty of space to rub and generate static electricity, hence the beginning of my hypothesis. It can also rub against itself since cloth is not flat and rigid. Also if this happens during the use of treadmills then the possibility is even higher since treadmills are practically always under friction. Frictionless situations don't commonly exist in real life, only in physics exercise problems.

 

 

Well, seriously, I don't know if there was a reason to get all hot headed around here but... there is one VERY simple way to test if it's microphonics:

With your earphones worn, try tapping, flicking, or rubbing the cables onto some surfaces. If that's what you were hearing, then it's easier done than said: microphonics. Same concept as the paper cups & cord 'telephone'.

 

But microphonics isn't really an occasional and random encounter. It gets pretty annoying...

Whatever the case, avoiding microphonics is always a first step when doing exercise (or using IEMs), so tinyman's tips will be useful if ever you have trouble with that.

 

 

Those M9 look like they have cloth covered cables, from the pictures on Newegg. I personally do like cloth covered cables but they do tend to rub more easily, so as might your chances of generating static (electricity). The NE700X might help by having rubbery cables.

That said, if it is indeed the work of static electricity, your cord is generally not the main culprit but your clothes, so the cables are not going to completely solve your problem. Not telling you to change anything at this point, but just to let you know that if sitting still with your music player in your hands does not generate this problem, then your headphones are not the culprit (part of your original question).

 

If ever the audio is cutting off at times, and quick succession of this causing what seems like a static sound, then your cables are dying (usually near the plug or the earbuds themselves). You can try applying some pressure about these places to see if you can recreate the problem. You can also apply pressure sideways on your IEM plugs themselves rather than the cable strain relief sections when it is plugged in to your phone. If you get audio channel cuts with this last test then the output jack on your phone is loose.

 

 

 

Quote:
Edit: Also FWIW I never meant to say the noise literally stounded like "static"  but, more the closest thing I can think of to describe it would be like radio static when you put your radio on a frequency that isn't being used locally.

Static can produce that sound but more often with than without popping IME.

Loose connection on jack/plug/cable can cause this but it's more likely for the sound to cut completely.

Now to ask something completely crazy but, do you remember the tracks where you experienced this? It could also be the song itself, whether intentional sound effects or bad recording or low quality file.

 

If ever any other digital/electronic devices is put in immediate proximity to your phone then it could possibly even be interference but... probably not the case. I can't imagine you'd pack too much things in the same pockets while doing exercise!


Edited by kalbee - 12/24/12 at 8:37pm
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

Pockets as a whole in sports shorts/pants are usually made up of 3 total layers: pocket inner, pocket outer, and pants. 3 layer is plenty of space to rub and generate static electricity, hence the beginning of my hypothesis. Also if this happens during the use of treadmills then the possibility is even higher since treadmills are practically always under friction. Frictionless situations don't commonly exist in real life, only in physics exercise problems.

 

 

Well, seriously, I don't know if there was a reason to get all hot headed around here but... there is one VERY simple way to test if it's microphonics:

With your earphones worn, try tapping, flicking, or rubbing the cables onto some surfaces. If that's what you were hearing, then it's easier done than said: microphonics. Same concept as the paper cups & cord 'telephone'.

 

But microphonics isn't really an occasional and random encounter. It gets pretty annoying...

Whatever the case, avoiding microphonics is always a first step when doing exercise (or using IEMs), so tinyman's tips will be useful if ever you have trouble with that.

 

 

Those M9 look like they have cloth covered cables, from the pictures on Newegg. I personally do like cloth covered cables but they do tend to rub more easily, so as might your chances of generating static (electricity). The NE700X might help by having rubbery cables.

That said, if it is indeed the work of static electricity, your cord is generally not the main culprit but your clothes, so the cables are not going to completely solve your problem. Not telling you to change anything at this point, but just to let you know that if sitting still with your music player in your hands does not generate this problem, then your headphones are not the culprit (part of your original question).

 

If ever the audio is cutting off at times, and quick succession of this causing what seems like a static sound, then your cables are dying (usually near the plug or the earbuds themselves). You can try applying some pressure about these places to see if you can recreate the problem. You can also apply pressure sideways on your IEM plugs themselves rather than the cable strain relief sections when it is plugged in to your phone. If you get audio channel cuts with this last test then the output jack on your phone is loose.

 

 

 

Static can produce that sound but more often with than without popping IME.

Loose connection on jack/plug/cable can cause this but it's more likely for the sound to cut completely.

Now to ask something completely crazy but, do you remember the tracks where you experienced this? It could also be the song itself, whether intentional sound effects or bad recording or low quality file.

 

If ever any other digital/electronic devices is put in immediate proximity to your phone then it could possibly even be interference but... probably not the case. I can't imagine you'd pack too much things in the same pockets while doing exercise!

 

I don't feel it's microphonics any longer FYI (after finding out it's spuratic).  That's why I was fishing for more information.  

 

It's true that many gym shorts are made of 3 layers (some are 2, others are 1 like my J's), but the problem persists that they can also be damp or wet (runners are known to sweat).  It could be the source of static shock early in the work out, but late?  I'll tell you, I don't sweat too much, and my shorts don't produce static electricity after a workout like they do before.  From the shorts, it needs to find some way up the headphones.  His phone is covered in plastic (it's a Samsung Captivate) and the headphone cable is rubber (MEElectronics doesn't use cloth).  

 

Your idea can be true, but I have a feeling that it's a slight disconnection of the headphone jack (not enough to disconnect sound, but enough to produce the popping and static sounds) with certain movements.  My iPod Touch 4G got this to happen in the gym with my PFE232 (it was about a year old with constant use; his phone probably has about the same use as my iPod by now) at times too while I was lifting, but it would only happen on violent motions.  I stopped using my PFE232 in the gym after that day for obvious reasons.

 

Either direction, I agree that it's not the headphones.  There is a way to test this though, test a different pair of shorts :p  


Edited by tinyman392 - 12/24/12 at 8:50pm
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selenium View Post

He isn't talking about driver flex though! Yeah, the driver flexes at the exact moment when the cable runs across his shorts. Makes sense.
I have no solution for you, OP. My EX1000 and FX700 have also been prone to static electricity, so I dont think its an issue of throwing more money at it. Maybe try all-plastic housings?

 

I meant unplug from his MP3 Player, not his ear.  I was wondering why the heck you kept bringing up driver flex, finally figured it out (I didn't word it specific enough, my bad).  This can cause a pop and static (with reason).  


Edited by tinyman392 - 12/24/12 at 9:50pm
post #38 of 48
Has anyone mentioned possibly...you know...I think the best way to tackle this to try another set of IEM's. See if the problem occurs again.

Trouble shoot the problem one piece at a time. I highly doubt your clothing is doing anythig to cause the problem.

Could it be some sort of interference the phone has picked up at the gym?
Edited by H20Fidelity - 12/24/12 at 11:04pm
post #39 of 48
Thread Starter 

I'm ordering a new set of headphones tomorrow.

I'm hoping the Nuforce NE700x's will be a substantial upgrade either way.

May still order something else but,they seem like best bang for buck.

Edit: Should probably mention the cord on the MEE 9's is not braded though it appears to be. There is plastic over it, and I'm considering the Astrotec AM-90's since they have stellar reviews almost universally here along with cheap cost.


Edited by Snow_Fox - 12/24/12 at 11:29pm
post #40 of 48

When I am wearing heavy clothes such as jeans I notice the sound has more low end, heavier if you will... When wearing cotton or similar lighter materials I notice the sound is lighter and more airy.

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholars View Post

When I am wearing heavy clothes such as jeans I notice the sound has more low end, heavier if you will... When wearing cotton or similar lighter materials I notice the sound is lighter and more airy.

Well, now that you mention it,  when I stated that I thought the W4 lower midrange sounded kind of wooly and fuzzy, I WAS wearing a bulky sweater during those listening sessions.

post #42 of 48
I have a new pair of jeans burning in as we speak to test this!
post #43 of 48

I find that lycra biking shorts really brings out the highs in warmer sounding IEM's.

post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post

Well, now that you mention it,  when I stated that I thought the W4 lower midrange sounded kind of wooly and fuzzy, I WAS wearing a bulky sweater during those listening sessions.

 

Yes it is a well known phenomenon that wearing wool clothing can cause woolyness in the midrange, lycra can result in much tighter bass response.

post #45 of 48

The woolyness effect does really add good coloration to the mids and its can help mids that are recessed sound more forward and full.

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