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Do certain clothes alter sound quality? - Page 2

post #16 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

But for what matters for the OP, the more he can learn the better so it's all good. Can't say much about the people above but I decided to not suggest it being microphonics simply because it didn't sound like the problem (to me). I won't deny the possibility of being wrong though.

I welcome discussion of what may be the problem and have an interest in it.

Can't say I care much for the trolling but, I've been on the internet long enought to know there will be elitist.

Anyway, I normally wear shorts even when it's realtively cold and the MP3 player resides mostly in my pocket. This wasn't much of an issue when I first got the headphones but, it definitely has become a bit more of a factor and I figured I try to understand why. Either way, I'm definitely looking for a reliable upgrade and hoping it may resolve the issue.

post #17 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

I'm not so sure, I experience a lot of static especially with the coming of winter--when it becomes drier and I have to wear warmer clothes which often involves fuzzy or insulating materials. Or even nylon outers with other types of cloth rubbing against each other due to wearing multiple layers.

Even without all that much layers of clothes, I also experience static when on the treadmill or when my PMP is in sport pants pocket. The headphone jack is connected to the PMP, and both are in the pocket. With exercise and motion, they rub around on the inside of the pocket and sometimes there will just be static added to the sound. This is when I think armbands for PMP is a good idea haha.

I experience these even with headphones, which isn't nearly as sensitive to microphonics.

 

And the sound is none other than what you'd hear with "static" and noise in radios and other audio devices: noise, scratchy sounds, and pops. It has zero likeness or inclusion of volume spikes... if you want a common example, it sounds pretty much exactly when you're fiddling with the leads of a full size speaker that is plugged in. Or when you have scratchy pots in your receiver.

Not exactly the same as microphonics sound.

 

But for what matters for the OP, the more he can learn the better so it's all good. Can't say much about the people above but I decided to not suggest it being microphonics simply because it didn't sound like the problem (to me). I won't deny the possibility of being wrong though.

 

True static electricity would cause something different to happen.  Even further, it's not really possible to have without a buildup of electrons, which won't happen if there is ground nearby (EG, the grounding pole of your headphones).  That said, it's highly unlikely that it's static electricity.  Static electricity discharges in "groups".  The only time it comes close to not looking like it's discharging in "groups" is when you've got constant static electricity building up (in the event of a generator; like the Van De Graaff I said earlier).  

 

The only types of noises I can produce similar to what you say is by rotating my headphone jack in my iPod.  This produces the scratchy noise, some pops, and even something that can sound like static.  This is something else, and not related to static electricity.  Rather it's the dust and debris getting in the way of a strong connection.  Solution here would be to clean your headphone jack and the internal contacts of your DAC.  If this is indeed the problem, you'll be able to reproduce it by rotating the headphone jack when it's inside the socket with music playing.  It will stop if all the dust and debris rubs off.  Please note that ALL headphones are suseptible to this, and upgrade won't help you.


Edited by tinyman392 - 12/24/12 at 5:56pm
post #18 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

You're experiencing microphonics.  I'm surprised no one here said anything about it, rather pointed and made a joke out of it.  That said, try using a cable clip (many headphones come with them) or use a headphone designed for sports use.  Other things you can try is to slip the cable under your shirt (hoping the cable won't bother your skin).  Final option is to wear the headphones with the cable looping over the ear (at this point, I'm assuming you're talking about IEMs; if not, don't do this).  All of these suggestions can be used in combination with each other as well.  

He isn't talking about microphonics. Reading comprehension.

OP, sorry I can't be of more help than just making (funny)sophomoric jokes. I have static electricity issues at work sometimes, my Fiio E7 will actually short out and stop working with even just a bit of static. Getting shocked in the ear is also not unheard of, though it hasn't happened to me in a long time.
post #19 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snow_Fox View Post

I welcome discussion of what may be the problem and have an interest in it.

Can't say I care much for the trolling but, I've been on the internet long enought to know there will be elitist.

Anyway, I normally wear shorts even when it's realtively cold and the MP3 player resides mostly in my pocket. This wasn't much of an issue when I first got the headphones but, it definitely has become a bit more of a factor and I figured I try to understand why. Either way, I'm definitely looking for a reliable upgrade and hoping it may resolve the issue.

I guess you're not Snow_Fox for nothing then!

 

Might you tell us what earphones those are? Not to say it will really help solve the problem but out of interest (and if you're looking to upgrade too).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

 

True static electricity would cause something different to happen.  Even further, it's not really possible to have without a buildup of electrons, which won't happen if there is ground nearby (EG, the grounding pole of your headphones).  That said, it's highly unlikely that it's static electricity.  Static electricity discharges in "groups".  The only time it comes close to not looking like it's discharging in "groups" is when you've got constant static electricity building up (in the event of a generator; like the Van De Graaff I said earlier).  

 

The only types of noises I can produce similar to what you say is by rotating my headphone jack in my iPod.  This produces the scratchy noise, some pops, and even something that can sound like static.  This is something else, and not related to static electricity.  Rather it's the dust and debris getting in the way of a strong connection.  Solution here would be to clean your headphone jack and the internal contacts of your DAC.  If this is indeed the problem, you'll be able to reproduce it by rotating the headphone jack when it's inside the socket with music playing.  It will stop if all the dust and debris rubs off.  Please note that ALL headphones are suseptible to this, and upgrade won't help you.

I don't know what to say.

The way it sounds is very much like the dust you're talking about, but happens along the length of the cable as well as at either ends. Basically I can't say much but that static on headphone/earphones sound like static. The same sound like when you're taking off a wool sweater or something. I brought up that example namely because they sound similar, not to express that thus is the problem.

If you don't ever encounter the occasion of getting static to pop in your headphones, then the better it is for you. Just don't discard the idea as misconceptions of other problems.

post #20 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selenium View Post


He isn't talking about microphonics. Reading comprehension.
OP, sorry I can't be of more help than just making (funny)sophomoric jokes. I have static electricity issues at work sometimes, my Fiio E7 will actually short out and stop working with even just a bit of static. Getting shocked in the ear is also not unheard of, though it hasn't happened to me in a long time.

 

He states the audio gets filled with "static".  My statement was that this "static" that he hears is microphonics assuming his headphone jack isn't twisting while he's active.  If he's active, the skin will at least be moist from the body's natural cooling system, so a static charge building up will be unlikely.  It'll be less unlikely in the pants pocket either as the moisture will eventually get into the pocket and remain in there (trapped in a way).  He isn't getting shocked (and that would be caused by the shock coming from your ear to your gear, not the other way around).  Static electricity is unlikely in his circumstance...  Unless he's running on a wool carpet.  

post #21 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

I guess you're not Snow_Fox for nothing then!

Might you tell us what earphones those are? Not to say it will really help solve the problem but out of interest (and if you're looking to upgrade too).

I don't know what to say.
The way it sounds is very much like the dust you're talking about, but happens along the length of the cable as well as at either ends. Basically I can't say much but that static on headphone/earphones sound like static. The same sound like when you're taking off a wool sweater or something. I brought up that example namely because they sound similar, not to express that thus is the problem.
If you don't ever encounter the occasion of getting static to pop in your headphones, then the better it is for you. Just don't discard the idea as misconceptions of other problems.

The sweater comment is a dead giveaway. He's talking about static electricity Mr. Know It All.
post #22 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

I guess you're not Snow_Fox for nothing then!

 

Might you tell us what earphones those are? Not to say it will really help solve the problem but out of interest (and if you're looking to upgrade too).

Right now I'm just using a set of ME M9's.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA0FU0FS6676&Tpk=m9%20headphones

Mine are a different color but, I think that's about the same other than that.

I'm considering these right now http://www.amazon.com/NuForce-NF-NE-700X-NE700X-In-ear-Headphones/dp/B004GFNDDG

I was also recommended the Dunu DN18's which I was ready to buy until I realized they don't deliver in the US.

post #23 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selenium View Post


The sweater comment is a dead giveaway. He's talking about static electricity Mr. Know It All.

 

Now we have to find the source of this electric buildup.  Where do you think it's coming from.  We can't solve the problem without that information.  You can't say it's static electricity without that information either.  Just FYI, the person you quoted is NOT the OP...  


Edited by tinyman392 - 12/24/12 at 7:24pm
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

I guess you're not Snow_Fox for nothing then!

 

Might you tell us what earphones those are? Not to say it will really help solve the problem but out of interest (and if you're looking to upgrade too).

 

I don't know what to say.

The way it sounds is very much like the dust you're talking about, but happens along the length of the cable as well as at either ends. Basically I can't say much but that static on headphone/earphones sound like static. The same sound like when you're taking off a wool sweater or something. I brought up that example namely because they sound similar, not to express that thus is the problem.

If you don't ever encounter the occasion of getting static to pop in your headphones, then the better it is for you. Just don't discard the idea as misconceptions of other problems.

 

Test the dust, twist your M9 jack while it's in the device you use (whatever it may be).  If that's the case, I'm willing to say that's what it is.  Your movement is causing the headphone jack to twist and produce interference while you're moving.  

post #25 of 48
Thread Starter 

So I plugged in my captivate and played fear by disturbed. 

Twisted around the jack and nothing happened. Just kept playing without missing  a beat.

Edit: Also FWIW I never meant to say the noise literally stounded like "static"  but, more the closest thing I can think of to describe it would be like radio static when you put your radio on a frequency that isn't being used locally.


Edited by Snow_Fox - 12/24/12 at 7:29pm
post #26 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snow_Fox View Post

So I plugged in my captivate and played fear by disturbed. 

Twisted around the jack and nothing happened. Just kept playing without missing  a beat.

 

OK, we know that's not the problem then.  Are you running, jogging, etc when you're experiencing this?  Or are you doing something less strenuous like walking?  How tightly wound up is the MP3 player (assumption) in your pocket?  Are you using any amps (if yes to amps, then we have a chance for static electric buildup)?  How old is your MP3 player that you are using?


Edited by tinyman392 - 12/24/12 at 7:30pm
post #27 of 48
Thread Starter 

It's actually somewhat random.

The most noticible time I can remember is I was just walking to go get water in the gym and the cord moved across my shorts.

The MP3 player I'm using is my former phone the Samsung Captivate. Usually there is plenty of room in my pocket as my gym clothes are somewhat baggy.

No AMPs and the MP3 player is almost 2 years old.

post #28 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snow_Fox View Post

It's actually somewhat random.

The most noticible time I can remember is I was just walking to go get water in the gym and the cord moved across my shorts.

The MP3 player I'm using is my former phone the Samsung Captivate. Usually there is plenty of room in my pocket as my gym clothes are somewhat baggy.

No AMPs and the MP3 player is almost 2 years old.

 

Try this, I'm not sure if this is what's happening, but do try it.  Put your M9s in your ears.  Slowly insert the IEMs until they are in.  Slowly remove the IEMs.  Repeat if you can't hear the sound (it's normal for a sound to spark off here, it, at times can sound a lot like static).  

post #29 of 48
He isn't talking about driver flex either.
Edited by Selenium - 12/24/12 at 7:48pm
post #30 of 48
Thread Starter 

I could hear a popping sound but, it was organic sounding rather than mechanical.

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