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post #106 of 182

One too many pairs of generic $50 earbuds pushed me over the edge and I decided it was time to get serious about music. I'm much more enjoying of music now, sigh the upgrade itch already needs scratching : |

post #107 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by nihilill View Post

One too many pairs of generic $50 earbuds pushed me over the edge and I decided it was time to get serious about music. I'm much more enjoying of music now, sigh the upgrade itch already needs scratching : |

Get used to it, if you like me... you'll upgrade like a mad men, then sell half the cans you have to pay bills xD then ofc the cycle starts over again <3

 

BUY EVERYTHING-> On crap Insurance-> SELL HALF UR STUFF-> YES insurance paid-> BUY MORE

 

Lol, that seems to b my cycle, thankfully I have enough old under used gear that I can keep what I like and get rid of my past trophies! 

post #108 of 182

Don't really have an easy way to sell of stuff here without making a well over 50% loss. (due to the 60% higher than MSRP pricing of goods here) So i'm pretty stuck with what i have now but that's alright, i'm pretty happy with what i havewink.gif

post #109 of 182

This long winded coffee-fueled tome should probably be a blog article instead of a thread post but since the blogs I write for are photography related I didn't have anywhere to post this.  Only read on if you have some time to kill and are interested in the ramblings of a fellow audiophile tracing his audio history as inspired by finding this thread.

 

I can clearly see several instances where an experience listening to music shaped my appreciation for good audio in my formative years.

 

1974 was my first experience with music.  I remember wearing out the Royal Guardsmen's Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron album on a toy record player with my little sister.  See the video on Youtube.

 

In 1976 my sister and I started playing my parents discarded musical remnants on a console system.  We listened to Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass along with Andy Williams (Born Free) and John Denver.  I never recall them listening to music when we were kids.  My mom used to tell stories about how my dad shook the whole neighborhood with the canons in the 1812 Overture when they were first married.  I remember thinking at the time that I would never stop listening to music.

 

In 1977 we lived in San Diego and I built an FM radio with a Radio Shack 100-1 electronics kit.  I would lay in bed at night with the one earpiece listening to Wolf Man Jack's Pirate radio broadcast from Tijuana - no mom I'm not listening to rock music. 

 

Getting in the passenger seat of a friends 63 Chevy pickup as a freshmen in 1979 I sat on an 8 track of Hotel California that someone must have tossed in the open window.  We popped it in the trucks 8 track player and were mesmerized by the title song which is still one of my favorites.

 

In the summer of 1980 I was rummaging through a friends attic with him and his brother and we found a stash of 45rpm records.  It turns out his mom used to work at a radio station and she saved the 45 collection when they switched over to albums.  It was in this stash that we "discovered" Genesis mixed in with a lot of 50's music.

 

In 1981 I distinctly remember listening to Album Rock FM stations while cruising in my muscle car on warm Texas summer nights.  Foreigner, Rush, Led Zeplen and of course ZZ Top.  Phil Collins was also in heavy rotation with In the Air Tonight and to this day I can transport myself back to blissfully driving with the windows down playing this song over the chorus of cicadas on a backcountry road outside of Dallas.

 

1982 MTV arrives and I'm hooked on Billy Idol, Duran Duran, XTC, The Clash, The Knack, Cyndi Lauper and many others who have stuck with me over the years especially Elvis Costello.

 

In 1984 I tired of constantly replacing worn out cassette tapes I start buying into the new Compact Disc format even though I didn't have a player.  CD players cost over $1000 the first year they were out and CD's were $17.95 but the media kept repeating the music label mantra that CD's were cheaper to produce than records and in "no time" the price would drop below the current $9 price of vinyl records.  I eventually got a CD player from Rent-To-Own and hooked it up to a hand me down amp and some really great Klipsch speakers that were on loan to me for about a year until an acquaintance paid me back the money he owed.  Nothing I had ever heard compared to listening to CD's on that system.  I distinctly remember the clarity of the roulette ball drop at the beginning of Depeche Mode's Master and Servant as well as being able to make the windows rattle  without hearing a lot of distortion when blasting Burning Down the House by The Talking Heads.

 

We couldn't get the local band that we really liked for our wedding in 1989 so my wife and I decided that we should get a CD changer and program the music for the reception.  First song was Van Morrison's Moon Dance which followed the bag pipe player's recessional.  As the evening went on the music changed to a more fast pace and it was a real party by the time all of the older guests left.  We essentially got to take the band home with us in the form of our new CD changer.

 

Next we started to flesh out our music collection using the various clubs where you join and get 12 discs for the price of shipping with the commitment to purchase a set number of full price discs later.  We did the math and if you take your initial offerings and immediately purchase the required CD's and cancelled, it came out to less than $5 per disc (this is when record stores were still selling discs for $17 each).  We both joined competing clubs and cheaply added over 50 discs to our collection.

 

The late 90's weren't a great time for music on the radio.  The brief grunge period and the rise of No Doubt being the only bright spot in FM radio in Los Angeles where KISS 98 was playing Madonna and Michael Jackson in heavy rotation and KROQ was stuck in their past.  I found myself tuning out and listening to my CD collection even when in my car.  

 

In 2000 Macster allowed me to tap into the vast online collection of Napster users on my Apple Performa 6360.  I immediately ran to radio shack and bought the audio cables to connect my computer to my stereo.  My wife worked nights at the time so I rearranged the furniture with a wingback chair placed right in the middle of the living room which was the sweet spot for my overly large Yamaha Natural Sound Speakers that my wife's parents had brought back from Germany for her (go figure).

 

I sat in my chair in the dark most of the night and lost myself in rediscovering old favorites and developing new ones like Radio Head.  It was so refreshing to find songs like David Bowie and Trent Reznor's I'm Afraid of Americans along with singer songwriters who had no voice on current radio stations due to the Clear Channel consolidation and homogenization of American radio.

 

It was computer audio and Napster that lead me to my first headphones.  Guided by GoodSound.com who's mission at the time was to showcase great audio at affordable prices, I went to my local Hi-Fi store in Pasadena and purchased a pair of Grado SR60's.  I used those Grado's via headphone out on my receiver and on my Creative Nomad Jukebox MP3 player.  This player was shaped like a portable CD player and had a 6 Gig hard drive, headphone jack and line outs.  It was eventually replaced with the first generation iPod.

 

Around that same time I purchased a refurbished 200 disc CD player.  I spent countless hours trying to catalog and organize the CDs in the player because music labels were so lame that they wouldn't put song titles on the CD's so that it would be inconvenient to burn your own CD's or copy the music to your computer (most labels still don't put that info on CD's even though you can easily access an online databases for track title information).  Add that to the fact that they never lowered the price of physical media as promised and you can see how their relationship with their customers deteriorated to the point that almost everyone felt justified in getting even by not paying for music.  

 

For the one or two of you who have read this far, this is the point where I realized I had become an audiophile.  I wasn't interested in someone's low quality rip of a song for anything but auditioning new music.  The iTunes store provided some much needed consistency over Napster but 128K sounded like AM radio to me so my own CD rips were 328K and later Apple Lossless from purchased CD's.  I used the iTunes store as a companion to Rolling Stone Magazine reviews downloading 2-3 tracks from every album I liked.  I'd also use the iTunes "other people bought" tool to find similar new music.  Then I would load up my iPod and walk the dog.  Songs that stuck out from the MP3 playlist were then bought on CD and replaced in my iTunes library.

 

Somewhere in the jumble of early Napster/iTunes and my 200 disc changer I started "stopping by" Hi Fi shops when out and about.  I heard my same CD jukebox playing in one of the stores and it sounded superior to my set up so I started asking why.  That's when I learned about optical inputs and DACs.  I ran home with a Toslink cable and connected my CD player to my Technics receiver instead of using the players analog outs.  Wow!  I couldn't believe the difference using the DAC in my receiver.

 

Next I stumbled upon Head-fi and as a result the Headroom Micro stack and a pair of AKG K701's with an iPod Video which was given to me by Tim Cook for coming up to Cupertino and consulting on Aperture (had to throw that in).

 

Now I use a first generation AppleTV with a 250 gig hard drive loaded with Apple Lossless music connected to my Marantz system via HDMI and feeding a bedroom dac/amp with a Toslink cable.  That system has replaced a CD jukebox for convenient access to high quality music.

 

But it doesn't stop there.  When I want to really sit and listen to music, I put a high resolution disc into my Marantz universal player.  I have a large collection of SACD's, DVD Audio and Blu-ray music that sounds great in 2 channel and a lot of it in 5.1 surround.  I love being immersed in surround sound mixes of great songs like Hotel California (SACD), David Bowie's Fame (DVD Audio) or Rush's Moving Pictures (Blu-ray).  I find myself seeking out one off discs like a recent ebay purchase of The Rolling Stones Sympathy for the Devil Remix SACD single.  It has 6 remixed versions of the song by various artists but the real gem is the full length original version in 5.1 surround.

 

Being an audiophile is a fun hobby.  There are lots of gadgets to research and interesting music to discover.  One of my favorite ways to unwind is sitting on my couch listening to 5.1 mixes with a drink in my hand and my dog next to me.  I also enjoy sharing that experience with friends who have no clue what they've been missing in their music.  Welcome to Head-fi, sorry about your wallet.

 

 


Edited by mbritt - 5/16/13 at 3:24pm
post #110 of 182
Thread Starter 

It's nice reading a full story in full detail and I think more people should do this sort of thing.

post #111 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbritt View Post

This long winded coffee-fueled tome should probably be a blog article instead of a thread post but since the blogs I write for are photography related I didn't have anywhere to post this.  Only read on if you have some time to kill and are interested in the ramblings of a fellow audiophile tracing his audio history as inspired by finding this thread.

 

I can clearly see several instances where an experience listening to music shaped my appreciation for good audio in my formative years.

 

1974 was my first experience with music.  I remember wearing out the Royal Guardsmen's Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron album on a toy record player with my little sister.  See the video on Youtube.

 

In 1976 my sister and I started playing my parents discarded musical remnants on a console system.  We listened to Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass along with Andy Williams (Born Free) and John Denver.  I never recall them listening to music when we were kids.  My mom used to tell stories about how my dad shook the whole neighborhood with the canons in the 1812 Overture when they were first married.  I remember thinking at the time that I would never stop listening to music.

 

In 1977 we lived in San Diego and I built an FM radio with a Radio Shack 100-1 electronics kit.  I would lay in bed at night with the one earpiece listening to Wolf Man Jack's Pirate radio broadcast from Tijuana - no mom I'm not listening to rock music. 

 

Getting in the passenger seat of a friends 63 Chevy pickup as a freshmen in 1979 I sat on an 8 track of Hotel California that someone must have tossed in the open window.  We popped it in the trucks 8 track player and were mesmerized by the title song which is still one of my favorites.

 

In the summer of 1980 I was rummaging through a friends attic with him and his brother and we found a stash of 45rpm records.  It turns out his mom used to work at a radio station and she saved the 45 collection when they switched over to albums.  It was in this stash that we "discovered" Genesis mixed in with a lot of 50's music.

 

In 1981 I distinctly remember listening to Album Rock FM stations while cruising in my muscle car on warm Texas summer nights.  Foreigner, Rush, Led Zeplen and of course ZZ Top.  Phil Collins was also in heavy rotation with In the Air Tonight and to this day I can transport myself back to blissfully driving with the windows down playing this song over the chorus of cicadas on a backcountry road outside of Dallas.

 

1982 MTV arrives and I'm hooked on Billy Idol, Duran Duran, XTC, The Clash, The Knack, Cyndi Lauper and many others who have stuck with me over the years especially Elvis Costello.

 

In 1984 I tired of constantly replacing worn out cassette tapes I start buying into the new Compact Disc format even though I didn't have a player.  CD players cost over $1000 the first year they were out and CD's were $17.95 but the media kept repeating the music label mantra that CD's were cheaper to produce than records and in "no time" the price would drop below the current $9 price of vinyl records.  I eventually got a CD player from Rent-To-Own and hooked it up to a hand me down amp and some really great Klipsch speakers that were on loan to me for about a year until an acquaintance paid me back the money he owed.  Nothing I had ever heard compared to listening to CD's on that system.  I distinctly remember the clarity of the roulette ball drop at the beginning of Depeche Mode's Master and Servant as well as being able to make the windows rattle  without hearing a lot of distortion when blasting Burning Down the House by The Talking Heads.

 

We couldn't get the local band that we really liked for our wedding in 1989 so my wife and I decided that we should get a CD changer and program the music for the reception.  First song was Van Morrison's Moon Dance which followed the bag pipe player's recessional.  As the evening went on the music changed to a more fast pace and it was a real party by the time all of the older guests left.  We essentially got to take the band home with us in the form of our new CD changer.

 

Next we started to flesh out our music collection using the various clubs where you join and get 12 discs for the price of shipping with the commitment to purchase a set number of full price discs later.  We did the math and if you take your initial offerings and immediately purchase the required CD's and cancelled, it came out to less than $5 per disc (this is when record stores were still selling discs for $17 each).  We both joined competing clubs and cheaply added over 50 discs to our collection.

 

The late 90's weren't a great time for music on the radio.  The brief grunge period and the rise of No Doubt being the only bright spot in FM radio in Los Angeles where KISS 98 was playing Madonna and Michael Jackson in heavy rotation and KROQ was stuck in their past.  I found myself tuning out and listening to my CD collection even when in my car.  

 

In 2000 Macster allowed me to tap into the vast online collection of Napster users on my Apple Performa 6360.  I immediately ran to radio shack and bought the audio cables to connect my computer to my stereo.  My wife worked nights at the time so I rearranged the furniture with a wingback chair placed right in the middle of the living room which was the sweet spot for my overly large Yamaha Natural Sound Speakers that my wife's parents had brought back from Germany for her (go figure).

 

I sat in my chair in the dark most of the night and lost myself in rediscovering old favorites and developing new ones like Radio Head.  It was so refreshing to find songs like David Bowie and Trent Reznor's I'm Afraid of Americans along with singer songwriters who had no voice on current radio stations due to the Clear Channel consolidation and homogenization of American radio.

 

It was computer audio and Napster that lead me to my first headphones.  Guided by GoodSound.com who's mission at the time was to showcase great audio at affordable prices, I went to my local Hi-Fi store in Pasadena and purchased a pair of Grado SR60's.  I used those Grado's via headphone out on my receiver and on my Creative Nomad Jukebox MP3 player.  This player was shaped like a portable CD player and had a 6 Gig hard drive, headphone jack and line outs.  It was eventually replaced with the first generation iPod.

 

Around that same time I purchased a refurbished 200 disc CD player.  I spent countless hours trying to catalog and organize the CDs in the player because music labels were so lame that they wouldn't put song titles on the CD's so that it would be inconvenient to burn your own CD's or copy the music to your computer (most labels still don't put that info on CD's even though you can easily access an online databases for track title information).  Add that to the fact that they never lowered the price of physical media as promised and you can see how their relationship with their customers deteriorated to the point that almost everyone felt justified in getting even by not paying for music.  

 

For the one or two of you who have read this far, this is the point where I realized I had become an audiophile.  I wasn't interested in someone's low quality rip of a song for anything but auditioning new music.  The iTunes store provided some much needed consistency over Napster but 128K sounded like AM radio to me so my own CD rips were 328K and later Apple Lossless from purchased CD's.  I used the iTunes store as a companion to Rolling Stone Magazine reviews downloading 2-3 tracks from every album I liked.  I'd also use the iTunes "other people bought" tool to find similar new music.  Then I would load up my iPod and walk the dog.  Songs that stuck out from the MP3 playlist were then bought on CD and replaced in my iTunes library.

 

Somewhere in the jumble of early Napster/iTunes and my 200 disc changer I started "stopping by" Hi Fi shops when out and about.  I heard my same CD jukebox playing in one of the stores and it sounded superior to my set up so I started asking why.  That's when I learned about optical inputs and DACs.  I ran home with a Toslink cable and connected my CD player to my Technics receiver instead of using the players analog outs.  Wow!  I couldn't believe the difference using the DAC in my receiver.

 

Next I stumbled upon Head-fi and as a result the Headroom Micro stack and a pair of AKG K701's with an iPod Video which was given to me by Tim Cook for coming up to Cupertino and consulting on Aperture (had to throw that in).

 

Now I use a first generation AppleTV with a 250 gig hard drive loaded with Apple Lossless music connected to my Marantz system via HDMI and feeding a bedroom dac/amp with a Toslink cable.  That system has replaced a CD jukebox for convenient access to high quality music.

 

But it doesn't stop there.  When I want to really sit and listen to music, I put a high resolution disc into my Marantz universal player.  I have a large collection of SACD's, DVD Audio and Blu-ray music that sounds great in 2 channel and a lot of it in 5.1 surround.  I love being immersed in surround sound mixes of great songs like Hotel California (SACD), David Bowie's Fame (DVD Audio) or Rush's Moving Pictures (Blu-ray).  I find myself seeking out one off discs like a recent ebay purchase of The Rolling Stones Sympathy for the Devil Remix SACD single.  It has 6 remixed versions of the song by various artists but the real gem is the full length original version in 5.1 surround.

 

Being an audiophile is a fun hobby.  There are lots of gadgets to research and interesting music to discover.  One of my favorite ways to unwind is sitting on my couch listening to 5.1 mixes with a drink in my hand and my dog next to me.  I also enjoy sharing that experience with friends who have no clue what they've been missing in their music.  Welcome to Head-fi, sorry about your wallet.

 

 

 

 

 

long but interesting read, yes, i went through the whole thing wink.gif

post #112 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddragon View Post

 

 

 

long but interesting read, yes, i went through the whole thing wink.gif

me to, maybe in 20 years I can wrtite that very same story :D but ofc about my own musical tastes!

 

N it wasn't that long ;3

post #113 of 182

I began with wanting a wireless headset for my xbox. I decided to buy a turtle beach x41 (which doesnt have the greatest audio quality) and thought they were great, however; i couldnt use them with my ipod so i researched headphones to try to get similar quality in a portable set of cans and went with the ultrasone dj1 pros.

post #114 of 182

One day during college a few years ago, a classmate came in wearing Sennheiser HD595s. Not knowing much about good headphones, he let me try them on. Sure it was before class, sure I heard a lot of outside noise, but they sounded amazing. That night, after I got home, I went online, did some researching and a few days later I was a proud owner of HD555s.

 

Since then I have upgraded to HD650s (with Little Dot MKIII and Little Dot dac) for home use, IE7s (unfortunately don't get much use) for portable use and Paradigm Mini Monitors with an HSU sub for a nice 2.1 setup.

 

Moving to a new place soon so I guess its time to upgrade my 2.1 set up as I will have more space...

post #115 of 182
I don't & have never thought of myself as an "audiophile" as it sounds kind of like a well mad word for 1 & Phile well when applied to eh the Ped* word on the front the whole term/ wording then takes on a sinister type of form, or U get people who think their eh "audiophile's" because they googled/ wiki'd it & cause they own an iPod think it applies to them.
So as U can kind of guess I hate that word & I'm not 1 either cause any that I've met are mostly geeky no lifer nutcases that talk constantly about a lot of stuff they don't even understand pretending that they do IMHO.

So I'll just say my short version of my story/ journey into seaking out the best sound that I can afford, as any1 who knows anything remotely about music components & adapters/ interconnects/ PSU etc etc... Know that the best quality sound doesn't come cheap, far far from it.
If U get the bug of I must improve my sound/ set up/ HiFi/ Interconnects/ speaker cables/ mains plugs or even filters/ headphones/ portable set ups be it all 1's or the rubber band brigade of little amps stuck to the back of their eh iPods or worse etc...

I'm now 42 forced to take very very early retirement due to a severe lung condition, was previously a Network Admin by Trade.
I was with a friend around 16 maybe 17 yrs old & my friend was fixing this guys tv (an internal fuse had blown) so it was a quick job (me personally had been taking things to bits to see how they work from a very young age, then learned to solder & fix & put things back together LOL)
Anys, this guy he let us see his Linn HiFi set up, Lp12 deck/ pre/ 2 PWR amps for biwaring his speakers & said it was running in bi-active mode, I didn't know what he meant, but he then played a few albums & what all good HiFis do when he cranked up the volume it didn't go that cheap system distortion way they all got, it actually sounded better the louder he went IMHO.

This experience stuck in my head ever since & when I got home, my pioneer separates & my technics speakers sounded like crap to what I had heard.
So ever since I've had a good few components etc... Regretted selling a 3 head Nakamichi tape deck once I sold just to buy a stupid games console it haunts me yet as this tape deck was up there with reviews only beaten by the "dragon" & a few others @ the time.

It's been so far like a 26 yr journey that as any person who searches for better sound will tell U that their always looking for better stuff IMHO.
Right now my Living room Linn PWR Amps/ Musical Fidelity M1CliC Streamer pre amp/ Nordost speaker cables & all Nordost Interconnects analogue & digital/ Linn keilidhs running in Tri-Active mode & Linn Katans running in Bi-wire passive mode/ Custom made Granite Bespoke Plinths for the Keilidhs with analogue seduction non slip feet for the floorstanders spikes & some AS gel feet for the Granite plinths so our living rooms floors don't shake like an earthquake anymore LOL. The Katans sit on top of the keilidhs with AS gel feet so sit pretty solid too.

A collection of varies headphones & my beloved portable & sometimes HiFi component Colorfly C4 pro that to me is unbeatable currently no matter what player/ amp combo U can try, the things so loud U will never ever need a portable amp for it IMHO.

I have my upstairs HiFi but also have a lot of stuff currently not being used so I need a clear out TBH LOL

As far as my journey in musicland goes I'm guessing my main HiFi is pretty much a kickass system TBH, so to improve IMHO I would have to completely change everything perhaps consider the Linn Klimax range but hey I ain't no millionaire as some are, so good luck if U can afford to put together a good system then good for U but my money limits me & IMHO my system does sound good so I'm reasonably happy with it all as everything's in good condition, I don't like marks/ scratches so I avoid any dented scraped marked stuff.

Portable player wise well IMHO there's only 1 choice for that so if U don't own a Colorfly C4 pro then I suggest U invest the asking price (here in UK it's £555.00 & cheap IMHO when U think of its quality from sound to build to multi use as a DAC or a player hooked into your main HiFi or a friends) cannot stress enough how good this thing is, sure I tried loads of Amp/ iPod combos but man that C4 is just the Ferrari 458 of the portable music listening market when an iPod/ amp combos just a Lada LOL, pair it with some good Cans & you've arrived, it's a music lovers dream player.
That crazy/ mental Chinese guy that demanded the specs & quality of the final product deserves a lot more credit than he gets & the player should get more attention as its like the best kept secret amongst HiFi/ headphone forums worldwide.
So IMHO portable wise I think even spending more would be a backstep as the C4 Pro still makes me smile every time I listen to a nice Flac song through my Buds.

My 2 cents worth on music lovers as I don't consider that mad word used to try to bracket U into a group. So I'll never be an eh "Audiophile" but I'll always chase the never ending pursuit of better sound... Always & Forever !!!


Greetz J.
post #116 of 182

I started off buying cheap 20 to 30 dollar in ears because i just couldent stand the ten dollar ones. i was trying to find something that was not so muddy and i really wanted more vocals but when i got thoses the trebel was always too harsh. i finaly settled for some jvc xx in ears thinking good sound can only come from a full sized speaker. thats when my friend bought some m50's. when i first

heard them they were amazing and i started saving. he also recomennded me to this site so i never really stopped saving... although my bank disagrees.... haha but

Happy Listening beerchug.gif

post #117 of 182

I started out because of working in the corporate world. I needed to listen to music to block out the ambient noise of the cubicle farm (and keep my sanity). It just gradually grew from there...

 

I get some comments about my headphones and inquires into how much they cost, usually prompting a sticker shock reaction... but then I explain that I've been using these headphones for 8+ hours a day, 5 days a week, for the past 5 years and challenge them to give an example of something they've used as much...

 

Amortized RETAIL cost of k271s used at work: $0.23 / day

 

And many more years to come!

post #118 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post

Get used to it, if you like me... you'll upgrade like a mad men, then sell half the cans you have to pay bills xD then ofc the cycle starts over again <3

 

BUY EVERYTHING-> On crap Insurance-> SELL HALF UR STUFF-> YES insurance paid-> BUY MORE

 

Lol, that seems to b my cycle, thankfully I have enough old under used gear that I can keep what I like and get rid of my past trophies! 

hmmm... now why does this sound so familiar?...

post #119 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frosty3258 View Post

hmmm... now why does this sound so familiar?...

Don't remind me, it's been about 3 months and FINALLY. I'm ready to buy again... well I will be in another MONTH lawl, but I always reaserach a month ahead of my purchases. But I did mod my w1000x today [I'm so glad I kept them] 

post #120 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post

Don't remind me, it's been about 3 months and FINALLY. I'm ready to buy again... well I will be in another MONTH lawl, but I always reaserach a month ahead of my purchases. But I did mod my w1000x today [I'm so glad I kept them] 

 

 

anything special about the w1000x that you care to share?

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