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Learning more about the science of sound - Page 21

post #301 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

If a tree falls in the forest and lands on an audiophile......?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by xnor View Post

... it makes a smushy sound.

 

Actually, I believe it makes a smushy sound with a distinct frequency loss at 4 kHz, with a spike between 8-10 kHz, and a huge bump in the 15-25 Hz region that many consider "bass heavy".

post #302 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by UmustBKidn View Post

 

Actually, I believe it makes a smushy sound with a distinct frequency loss at 4 kHz, with a spike between 8-10 kHz, and a huge bump in the 15-25 Hz region that many consider "bass heavy".

If the audiophile lifted his veil first, he might have seen the tree coming....

post #303 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post

lately become more interested in the recording side of things and want to get more involved in that

If you're knowledgeable about audio generally, but not so much about recording, I think you'll get a lot out of chapters 5 through 14. Let me know how you progress.

--Ethan
post #304 of 395

So, here's how I'd sum it up:

 

"If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?"

 

If you choose the physical definition of sound, then the answer is "yes". (see objective reality)

If you choose the definition that sound is a subjective experience then the question is self-contradicting, because the premise is that no one is there, therefore the answer can only be "no".

Also, since your mind can play tricks on you you could hear a sound that's not real, so "if no tree falls in a forest and you are there, does it make a sound?" can be answered with "yes, it's possible" even if you are deaf.

 

Imho a trick question unless you clearly define what you mean with "sound" beforehand.

post #305 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanWiner View Post


If you're knowledgeable about audio generally, but not so much about recording, I think you'll get a lot out of chapters 5 through 14. Let me know how you progress.

--Ethan

 

Thanks, Ethan.

 

I've dabbled a bit before back in the day, but that was with an Apple II with a Passport MIDI card and a 4 track cassette. biggrin.gif

 

se

post #306 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post

So, here's how I'd sum it up:

 

"If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?"

 

If you choose the physical definition of sound, then the answer is "yes". (see objective reality)

If you choose the definition that sound is a subjective experience then the question is self-contradicting, because the premise is that no one is there, therefore the answer can only be "no".

Also, since your mind can play tricks on you you could hear a sound that's not real, so "if no tree falls in a forest and you are there, does it make a sound?" can be answered with "yes, it's possible" even if you are deaf.

 

Imho a trick question unless you clearly define what you mean with "sound" beforehand.

It is an old trick philosophical question with no single unqualified answer. But it used to be simpler than today.

 

"If a tree falls in a forests and no one is there to hear it, but someone left a portable .mp3 recorder near by and captured the event..."  

 

This could go on ad-nausium. 

post #307 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

It is an old trick philosophical question with no single unqualified answer.

 

Originally, yes. But over a century ago, it was adopted as a scientific question with a single qualified answer.

 

se

post #308 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post

Originally, yes. But over a century ago, it was adopted as a scientific question with a single qualified answer.

Yes! wink.gif

post #309 of 395

Corollary:

 

If you have good closed back headphones on while playing your mp3 player in the forest, and a tree behind you starts to fall down, it won't matter if it makes a sound or not - you won't hear it as it slams you into the dirt.

 

Perhaps an argument for open back portable headphones.

post #310 of 395

Perhaps an argument for open back portable headphones.

 

The only way I could really see myself using open-back portables is if I knew nobody else would be around (or I'm being a showoff with my fully portable Stax rig). Otherwise, I guess it might work if you have no regard for anyone within a ten foot proximity of yourself.


Edited by Tus-Chan - 6/6/13 at 11:36am
post #311 of 395

only in a library - if you are listening at safe levels for all day use, < 80 dB SPL, there aren't many urban public spaces that your headphone can be heard at 10 feet


Edited by jcx - 6/6/13 at 12:11pm
post #312 of 395

It's more often very difficult to listen at <80dB with open headphones in public places as you need to drown out any background noise to hear your music.  I'd choose closed-back design with excellent isolation so you could listen at lower volume levels in the same environment, falling trees be damned. eek.gif

post #313 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tus-Chan View Post
...
Otherwise, I guess it might work if you have no regard for anyone within a ten foot proximity of yourself.

 

In the forest, I have no regard for any trees under 10 feet tall that are within 10 feet of me.

But those big guns, oh yeah.

 

post #314 of 395

What is up with Currawong locking random Sound Science threads? I learnt that I must never use the term snake oil, audiophool, fanboy and so on....

post #315 of 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

What is up with Currawong locking random Sound Science threads? I learnt that I must never use the term snake oil, audiophool, fanboy and so on....

 

So he is just locking threads at random? I hardly think so. And I don't think the reason has to do with using silly terms.

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