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New to Classical Music - advice? - Page 7

post #91 of 109

Has anyone heard this one yet  for $1  ?

 

By the way, I have found listening to MP3 using Foobar2000 gives me the best sound.

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00B5Q7M90/?t=slickdeals&tag=slickdeals

 

 

 


Edited by mitchflorida - 1/27/13 at 11:22am
post #92 of 109
All the Bach Guild mp3 box sets are good.
post #93 of 109

I find the  Harnoncourt's Mozart requiem just so painfully slow...

post #94 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

That is how you are supposed to dress when you listen to them!

I like to dress extreme casual, keep my banjo at my side so I can play along when the mood strikes, and drink beer..

 

Seriously, I second the recommendation for the Rise of the Masters series. I think they are a credible and inexpensive way to learn about classical music. After a while you will develop preferences for certain composers. When you do, go to Spotify or Pandora, and listen to more samples of the composers you like played by different orchestras and musicians. Some of the recordings of the same symphony, for example, will sound very different from each other. I found exploring music in this manner to be interesting and enjoyable.

 

There are also many sub-genres in the type of music we call "classical".  Here's a good introduction: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_music  My favorites are baroque and 20th century music.

 

 

post #95 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

I find the  Harnoncourt's Mozart requiem just so painfully slow...

 

I've really enjoyed it, but, admittedly, I haven't heard the other versions.

post #96 of 109

There are countless other ones. Davis LSO, Rattle Berlin Phil, Karajan Berlin Phil, all these conductors have a much more spontaneous approach to the piece. I respect Harnoncourt as a Musicologist, he has written some deeply insightful dissertations, but in the Mozart, I just had to give up.

 

Do you have a specific preference for instrumental music? If so what instrument? Then I can recommend you a more specific range of pieces. 


Edited by uchihaitachi - 5/17/13 at 7:51am
post #97 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

There are countless other ones. Davis LSO, Rattle Berlin Phil, Karajan Berlin Phil, all these conductors have a much more spontaneous approach to the piece. I respect Harnoncourt as a Musicologist, he has written some deeply insightful dissertations, but in the Mozart, I just had to give up.

 

Do you have a specific preference for instrumental music? If so what instrument? Then I can recommend you a more specific range of pieces. 

No preference for instrument.

 

I'll just say that I prefer things that are haunting and somber or perhaps powerful as opposed to classical pieces that sound like deer frolicking in a field.

 

I recently attended the Nashville Symphonies performance of The Red Violin and enjoyed every second of it.

post #98 of 109
Ravel La Valse
Stravinsky Rite of Spring
post #99 of 109
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by uchihaitachi View Post

Ravel La Valse
Stravinsky Rite of Spring

Any particular recording of each of those?

post #100 of 109

Claudio Abbado and LSO for both. You might want to read up on the Rite of Spring on wiki or something. It has quite the back story. And it will sound extremely WTF is this at first....


Edited by uchihaitachi - 5/17/13 at 12:41pm
post #101 of 109

So im trying to get into classical and I really enjoy Rezso Seress - Szomoru Vasamap (Gloomy Sunday) & Schubert - Piano Trio #2 in E flat major.  So I guess where do I go from here?  I really enjoy the piano, violin & cello combo.

post #102 of 109

Some fantastic piano, violin & cello combos

 

Beethoven archduke trio

 

Sonata for Violoncello & Piano In G Minor, Op. 19 Rachmaninoff. The third movement of this piece is intimate romanticism at its best

 

Mozart - Quintet for Piano and Winds in E flat, K. 452 a stunning piece, Mozart considers it one of his favourite pieces

post #103 of 109
I'm amazed nobody has mentioned the best resource available for anyone new to classical music: the radio!

BBC Radio 3 is broadcast in the UK and also streamed to the world at 320 Kbps AAC which sounds really nice. As well as play back of CDs and discussion and interviews and features there are live concerts every day, usually two! These are not just collections of jobbing musicians knocking out some toonz, these are usually performers of the highest calibre. It's amazing. Radio 3 gets some deserved criticism for its morning shows which have dumbed down so we have to hear about how Doris of Basingstoke felt moved to tweet her deep appreciation of Bach while walking the dogs this morning and other similar inanities, but the music is still good and if you don't switch on until lunchtime you're spared the social media bs and interviews with weather show presenters and minor celebs.

It's on the BBCs iOS and Android apps, and iTunes, and plain old www pages. And if you just want a playlist url you can use the same one that iTunes does: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/listen/live/r3_aaclca.pls

Also very good is Concertzender a Dutch online broadcaster. Their pages are also available in English (mostly) and they have dedicated streams for Classical and Early music and even for sub-genres and other types of music. They also broadcast live performances.

The Czech Republic has http://www.rozhlas.cz/portal/portal/ which streams in high quality ogg vorbis.

Anyway there are numerous online stations out there and a few like those above offer really high quality streams and comprehensive published schedules and/or metadata so if you hear something you can find out exactly what it is. This is a brilliant way to discover music, and about history, context and the people.

The other resource that might be much better than you think is your local independent classical music shop, if it still exists. I live somewhere with a population of about a quarter of a million and there is now just one such shop left. It's quite small but has a good selection of new CDs and SACDs and two other great features: there is always some music playing and there are thousands of used CDs at great prices. Used CDs are cheap! I've found brilliant CDs that cost me pennies. Lots of them. OK I've bought a few that should never have been made and some that are fine but not to my taste but that's part of discovery and it's still rewarding. And while browsing I've heard music I've really enjoyed and been able to buy it right there. I might never have known that Respighi's unfinished Violin Concerto even existed let alone had been lovingly completed and brilliantly recorded, but I was browsing the used stacks wondering what this music was that I'd never heard before. Shortly afterwards I have in my hand the CD booklet to read while we listen. Then I buy it. It's a nice type of human experience that isn't duplicated by an online store.
Edited by julian67 - 5/21/13 at 7:55am
post #104 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by julian67 View Post

I'm amazed nobody has mentioned the best resource available for anyone new to classical music: the radio!

BBC Radio 3 is broadcast in the UK and also streamed to the world at 320 Kbps AAC which sounds really nice. As well as play back of CDs and discussion and interviews and features there are live concerts every day, usually two! These are not just collections of jobbing musicians knocking out some toonz, these are usually performers of the highest calibre. It's amazing. Radio 3 gets some deserved criticism for its morning shows which have dumbed down so we have to hear about how Doris of Basingstoke felt moved to tweet her deep appreciation of Bach while walking the dogs this morning and other similar inanities, but the music is still good and if you don't switch on until lunchtime you're spared the social media bs and interviews with weather show presenters and minor celebs.

It's on the BBCs iOS and Android apps, and iTunes, and plain old www pages. And if you just want a playlist url you can use the same one that iTunes does: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/listen/live/r3_aaclca.pls

Also very good is Concertzender a Dutch online broadcaster. Their pages are also available in English (mostly) and they have dedicated streams for Classical and Early music and even for sub-genres and other types of music. They also broadcast live performances.

The Czech Republic has http://www.rozhlas.cz/portal/portal/ which streams in high quality ogg vorbis.

Anyway there are numerous online stations out there and a few like those above offer really high quality streams and comprehensive published schedules and/or metadata so if you hear something you can find out exactly what it is. This is a brilliant way to discover music, and about history, context and the people.

The other resource that might be much better than you think is your local independent classical music shop, if it still exists. I live somewhere with a population of about a quarter of a million and there is now just one such shop left. It's quite small but has a good selection of new CDs and SACDs and two other great features: there is always some music playing and there are thousands of used CDs at great prices. Used CDs are cheap! I've found brilliant CDs that cost me pennies. Lots of them. OK I've bought a few that should never have been made and some that are fine but not to my taste but that's part of discovery and it's still rewarding. And while browsing I've heard music I've really enjoyed and been able to buy it right there. I might never have known that Respighi's unfinished Violin Concerto even existed let alone had been lovingly completed and brilliantly recorded, but I was browsing the used stacks wondering what this music was that I'd never heard before. Shortly afterwards I have in my hand the CD booklet to read while we listen. Then I buy it. It's a nice type of human experience that isn't duplicated by an online store.

True that about BBC Radio 3. I avoid tuning in however around 10-11pm when they start the weird contemporary jazz hours...

post #105 of 109
tattare, if you like the first piece you name as a song it might be worth investigating a few of Schubert's. These are popular so you should have a good choice of singers on Youtube :  
Du bist die Ruh D. 776
An die Musik D. 547
Nacht und Traume D. 827
Auf dem Wasser zu singen D. 774 
 
Towards the bottom of this Wikipedia entry there is a list of popular piano trios :
May have a go at working through those myself, with a little help from my local concerts  wink.gif
 
Happy hunting.
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