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DIY USB Charger (Can even charge an iPad)

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, first time poster here! I have really loved reading all sorts of threads here, as I really love my music and the quality from my Q701's and even my 240II's by AKG. I really love the community so I figured I give back a bit for all the boredom that has been cured and spent well on the forums. So on to the guide.

 

 

It's a modified version of http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/get_your_hack_on?page=0,1 , so credit to them for most of the guide!

 

You can use this charger to charge most USB charged items, such as COWONS, IPODS, IPHONES, AMPS, IPADS, PHONES, etc. Haven't tried with camera's yet but I assume it will work.

 

You will need:  All This can be bought at a local Radioshack or similar store

 

1 - USB A Female connector. This can be salvaged from any USB extender, or old computer. I salvaged mine from an xbox so there ya go :)

 

2 - Soldering Iron, Solder, and Insulated Wire. These are the Solder basics, if you don't know how to solder,google a tutorial or two, it's pretty easy, and it's fun, and it's a good thing to know how to do.

 

3 - Housing for the Unit. I used an ALTOIDS tin, but anything of that general size will work.

 

4 - Tool to cut housing. I use a DREMEL, which i used the cutoff wheel. It makes the hole a bit too big but I don't mind, mines a bit messy, and i'm fine with that.

 

5 - 2 Pin Switch or NON-MOMMENTARY Button. This means it clicks into the on position, so you don't have to hold the button down to charge.

 

6 - +5v Regulator. This takes away 4v of the 9v current from the battery, so your electronics don't fry :), you're welcome lol

 

7 - 9v Battery Holder. Preferably just the end snaps, not full plastic holder. Ones similar to mine are prefered.

 

8 - 9v Batteries. To power it.

 

9 - Hot Glue Gun & Glue

 

 

STEP 1:

 

Strip away all the wires from your connector, if you salvaged it, so you can only see the 4 pins on the back, no wires coming off.

 

 

STEP 2:

 

Cut and strip 4 wire pieces that you feel will fit nicely in your container, but not too small where you can't open it all the way. I prefer longer wires to be safe, which is a bit annoying to deal with at the end putting into the case but it's worth it in my opinion. Also, cut and strip 1 SMALL piece, about 1" in length.

 

 

STEP 3:

 

take a sharpie, or another method of marking, and mark the USB Connector as follows: Hold the connector facing you so that the black bar is on top, and you are looking into where you would plug your usb cable into. mark the LEFT side, anywhere, so you can see it.

 

 

STEP 4:

 

Mark the +5v Regular in this way: Hold the regulator so the pins go to the right, and the metal piece is on the bottom. Mark the bottom pin.

 

 

STEP 5:

 

Drill a hole in the top of your container, and insert your button/switch into it. Glue if neccessary. Make sure it is stable. DO NOT GLUE OVER THE PINS.

 

STEP 5.5:

 

Cut a hole in the side of your container, try to make it similar in size to the USB A Female Connector. DO NOT MAKE IT TO BIG. You can make up for it being a little too big, but try not to go too overboard, as it will look bad.

 

 

STEP 6:

 

Solder the RED (+) wire from the Battery Holder to either of the pins on your switch. This is so the switch can be used to allow/disallow the current from the battery (Turn it off).

 

 

STEP 7:

 

Solder a wire from the unused (other) pin on the switch to the MARKED pin on the +5v Regulator.

 

 

STEP 8:

 

Solder a wire from the farthest pin from the marked side on your USB Connector to the middle pin on the +5v Regulator.

 

 

STEP 9:

 

Solder the BLACK wire from the Battery Holder to the middle pin on the +5v Regulator. You should have 2 wires soldered to the same pin.

 

 

STEP 10:

 

Solder a wire from the closest pin to the MARKED side on the USB Connector to the farthest from marked pin on the Regulator (The unused pin).

 

 

STEP 11:

 

Solder the small wire from one of the middle pins on the USB Connector, to the other middle pin. This shorts out the Data in/out lines, and allows the device to use your charger as a Dedicated Charging Port. This allows it to charge ipads, phones, and other devices that require more power.

 

 

STEP 12:

 

The electronic component is now DONE! You can use the switch to control if the charger is on or off. Test it to make sure it works.

 

 

STEP 13:

 

Hot glue over the pins on the Regulator, USB Connector, to make sure they don't come undone.

 

 

STEP 14:

 

Glue in your USB Connector to fit it into the hole you cut before. Make sure you can plug something in through the hole by testing it. I advise doing this by glueing from the front first, since you can see where the port looks best, and then glueing the back, and peeling the glue off the front afterwards.

 

 

STEP 15:

 

Glue in the +5v Regulator. This just makes it more sturdy and less homemade feeling.

 

 

STEP 16:

 

Put the whole thing in your case, put the battery in, and you're done! Enjoy your new charger! Hope this helped a few of you :).

 

 

MY CHARGER:

 

Wouldn't let me insert pics ATM, will edit in a second, for now, links to the images on my server I guess.

 

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post #2 of 15

I'd love to see something like this except instead of using an expensive 9v how about some rechargeable 1.2v AAs?

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

What you could do is buy a 6 AA Battery Holder (5 preferably, but that would be very rare to find in a local store), and just substitute it for the 9v Battery Snap. It won't fit in the altoid tin anymore, but i'm sure you have a more creative idea for your charger :)

post #4 of 15
Why not get a MintyBoost?

http://adafruit.com/products/14
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

That's no fun to build! Haha, plus you save like $13 if you do it this way (lol), and it's something you can just decide to do, where as you have to order the minty boost, you can just decide to do this one day and get it done.
 

post #6 of 15

Your 7805 is about 55% efficient in converting the 9V to 5V. The rest is lost in heat resulting in a shorter battery life.

 

I use these in my 5V chargers, 90% efficient and only a 100uf cap needed externally.

Texas Instruments PT78HT205

 

beerchug.gif

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrollDragon View Post

Your 7805 is about 55% efficient in converting the 9V to 5V. The rest is lost in heat resulting in a shorter battery life.

 

I use these in my 5V chargers, 90% efficient and only a 100uf cap needed externally.

Texas Instruments PT78HT205

 

beerchug.gif


Thanks haha, I'm not the greatest electrical engineer by any means so thanks :)

post #8 of 15

Can anybody recommend the most optimal battery config using 1.2v rechargeable batteries? Would using 4 to create 4.8v be sufficient for a 5v charger?

post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneralSmirnoff View Post

Can anybody recommend the most optimal battery config using 1.2v rechargeable batteries? Would using 4 to create 4.8v be sufficient for a 5v charger?


I am not an electric engineer, but I would say probobly not going to charge the device in high power mode, which is what most phones and other devices need.

post #10 of 15

Silly question probably but: if a recharable battery was used would you have to remove the batteries to charge it?

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
I would try to make it cjargable without removing
post #12 of 15
Making it chargeable without removing is easy. "Trickle Charger Pimeta" are your magic words.

I just looked at your source link. You need to read the MintyBoost pages. Many devices need special tweaks to the D+/D- lines to charge properly.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobaltmute View Post

Making it chargeable without removing is easy. "Trickle Charger Pimeta" are your magic words.
I just looked at your source link. You need to read the MintyBoost pages. Many devices need special tweaks to the D+/D- lines to charge properly.

 

What do those magic words translate too? I have not yet built a Pimeta, so I don't understand how that translate's to this.

 

do you mean to replicate the "trickle charger" part of the pimeta on a bread board or similar? Sorry for the silly questions :(

post #14 of 15
The Pimeta V2 has the trickle charger built-in. The Pimeta V1 needed it added on. If you google it, you will find schematics for what you need to build (and maybe even an explanation of how it works).
post #15 of 15

ok, I was unaware of that difference between the Pimeta v1 vs v2. I'm about to get my Google on smily_headphones1.gif

 

Thank you for pointing me in the right direction.

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