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What's the highest general frequency music stops at? - Page 4

post #46 of 125
There ya go. That top octave is pretty much just harmonics on the cymbals.
post #47 of 125

The blind test here :

 

http://www.audiocheck.net/blindtests_frequency.php

post #48 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

There ya go. That top octave is pretty much just harmonics on the cymbals.

it really depends on what genre  the music mentioned is...
also harmonics are still audible. so in some sense it is to some degree important, but not as important as the fundamentals. 
though the question is what frequency does music extend to. so it should mean what is the highest frequency that is contained in a certain piece of music. and in that case harmonics also count.


Edited by streetdragon - 11/26/12 at 1:29am
post #49 of 125
Harmonics from some instruments extend up beyond the range of human hearing. But we can't hear them that high, or they're masked under fundamentals or so quiet you can't hear them, and they just don't matter. It's important to understand the relative importance of frequency bands. Some matter a whole lot, some don't.

By the time you get up to 10kHz, you've covered all the fundamentals and several levels of harmonics on almost all of the instruments. The range of human hearing is about 10 or 11 octaves. The key octaves are in the middle. The lowest and highest octaves are audible, but nowhere near as important to music as the others. The highest octave is the least important of all.

Audiophiles who don't know what they're doing often look at spec sheets and think that frequency extension is important. They buy the product with specs that say it goes up to 27kHz and assume that's better than one that just goes to 21kHz. The truth is, even the upper part of the audible range is pretty unimportant. The balance in the middle is what creates fantastic sound, not the upper frequencies that aren't even really in the music anyway.
Edited by bigshot - 11/26/12 at 11:06am
post #50 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Harmonics from some instruments extend up beyond the range of human hearing. But we can't hear them that high, or they're masked under fundamentals or so quiet you can't hear them, and they just don't matter. It's important to understand the relative importance of frequency bands. Some matter a whole lot, some don't.
By the time you get up to 10kHz, you've covered all the fundamentals and several levels of harmonics on almost all of the instruments. The range of human hearing is about 10 or 11 octaves. The key octaves are in the middle. The lowest and highest octaves are audible, but nowhere near as important to music as the others. The highest octave is the least important of all.
Audiophiles who don't know what they're doing often look at spec sheets and think that frequency extension is important. They buy the product with specs that say it goes up to 27kHz and assume that's better than one that just goes to 21kHz. The truth is, even the upper part of the audible range is pretty unimportant. The balance in the middle is what creates fantastic sound, not the upper frequencies that aren't even really in the music anyway.


Agree. Chances are the higher harmonics will be masked by other more prominent fundamentals at the similar or higher frequencies.

post #51 of 125

this may be the case on jazz or classical but i can tell for sure 10khz to at least 12khz is still important for electronic music and EDM

post #52 of 125
Especially considering how much EDM utilizes square waves, the higher frequency ranges are very important in electronic music.
post #53 of 125

Tiny Tortures by Flying Lotus has some crazy frequencies here and there!

post #54 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

this may be the case on jazz or classical but i can tell for sure 10khz to at least 12khz is still important for electronic music and EDM

 

10 to 12kHz is about three notes on a piano. Are three notes THAT important?

post #55 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

 

10 to 12kHz is about three notes on a piano. Are three notes THAT important?

If you want to get the full sound, yeah. For sure.

 

But what does a piano have to do with EDM and other electronica?

post #56 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

 

10 to 12kHz is about three notes on a piano. Are three notes THAT important?

its not all about notes in EDM since it hardly uses any form of real instruments. do note we are talking about genres that are build very differently, and sound no less different.
synths easily reach these frequencies afteral so yes it is important from what my ears tell me.
 


Edited by streetdragon - 11/27/12 at 1:04pm
post #57 of 125
You can hear around 130 notes (if my math is correct). The sound above 10kHz is 12 notes. The sound between 10 and 12 is around 3. If you actually sit down with a good equalizer and dial these frequencies in and out, you'll find that they don't amount to much more than a headache inducing, piercing squeal at the upper fringes of your hearing.

My lousy iPad speaker can only reproduce the 12kHz tone (annoying!). Above that, it just substitutes some sort of lower harmonic noise. Perhaps you have headphones you could use.

When was the last time you heard these frequencies as an important part of music?
Edited by bigshot - 11/27/12 at 1:22pm
post #58 of 125

it not a core, but a supportive harmonic. 
but as far as im concern, supportive or core, as long as i can hear it its importaint

and i have used many times my 250 band eq to dial the cut off point from 20khz downwards. so i know what the absense of 16khz,14khz,12khz and 10khz sounds like

kind of like having a pizza with the outer crust cut away, the essential core is still there, but it's missing something.


Edited by streetdragon - 11/27/12 at 1:38pm
post #59 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post


When was the last time you heard these frequencies as an important part of music?

Here's an example where cutting off 10Khz makes a HUGE difference, and there's nothing piercing about it:

 

 

Here's another good one:

 

The tamborine or whatever it is in the way beginning gets very muffled when 10Khz gets cut off. 


Edited by chewy4 - 11/27/12 at 2:41pm
post #60 of 125
If 10 to 20kHz is HUGE what do you call the same music with 2.5kHz to 5kHz dialed out?
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