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What's the highest general frequency music stops at? - Page 2

post #16 of 125

Maybe it's linear phase?

 

Let me recommend this freebie: rs-met engineersfilter. Tray the inverse chebychev low pass filter with high order.

post #17 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

hmm do you consider 250 band with -60db ~ +20db a basic eq?

 

Generally "muffled sound" affects the high end of music... 2kHz to 6kHz, not 12kHz-14kHz. Maybe you meant 2 to 4 not 12-14.

post #18 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

 

Generally "muffled sound" affects the high end of music... 2kHz to 6kHz, not 12kHz-14kHz. Maybe you meant 2 to 4 not 12-14.

no, i really mean 10khz and up. okay maybe not muffled, but just sounds like the last few edges of the treble are missing when i cut them to 10khz, 
maybe classical doesn't play this high, but the crash sounds i have in my edm music really does go that high. (about 6-14khz)

and lol how can i possibly mean 2-4khz? that is only the upper midrange

post #19 of 125

"Muffled" and "a few edges of the treble missing" are quite different, no? Not many instruments have fundamentals above 2-6kHz. That's the high end. Everything above that is harmonics. Just cymbals and triangles above 10kHz.

 

Note that each octave is roughly double the frequency. Not many people realize that the difference between 250Hz and 500Hz is the same as the difference between 10,000Hz and 20,000Hz.


Edited by bigshot - 11/21/12 at 3:11pm
post #20 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

"Muffled" and "a few edges of the treble missing" are quite different, no? Not many instruments have fundamentals above 2-6kHz. That's the high end. Everything above that is harmonics. Just cymbals and triangles above 10kHz.

 

Note that each octave is roughly double the frequency. Not many people realize that the difference between 250Hz and 500Hz is the same as the difference between 10,000Hz and 20,000Hz.

yeah i know i used the wrong term, that was my bad...
yep 1 octave up = x2 frequency
and 1 key up =  (base frequency) + (base frequency^1/12) i think
well anyway the main point was to see how high frequencies actually reach in music, and if i can hear something missing when i filter out 12khz and above (or 14khz) it still means they're are such frequencies in the music,
also most of what i have are synths. their range is higher than real instruments i feel
 

post #21 of 125

If I'm not mistaken, most audio equipment fails to output past 20khz anyway.

Most portable audio players as an example range from 20hz-20khz.

I haven't seen any that can output higher.

 

Am I not mistaken though, that even though you are stating instruments on their own, if you have in a mix multiple instruments, a couple couldn't exceed the frequency due to them coupling together in sound? Or am I thinking wrong? I'm not talking about volume.


Edited by musical-kage - 11/21/12 at 4:46pm
post #22 of 125
Human beings generally can't hear beyond 20kHz and even at the limit, it starts to become more sound pressure than sound. Above 14kHz or so it doesn't matter much.
post #23 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by eltocliousus View Post

I'm just curious as to what the highest frequency music tends to delivery, there are a lot headphones that 'supposedly' output well up into the 50-60khz range, and while I know this is just advertising flavour, as our ears can only hear between around 20hz - 17/20khz for the vast majority, I can't see much music going past 8-10khz. 

Great question. The "real" answer lies in what is called the overtone series.

Let's say that a guitarist plays a low C (about 131 Hz). The string of the guitar will be set into motion and will vibrate, creating the sound we hear (after being amplified, either from an acoustic guitar's soundboard or electronically in an electric guitar). This main pitch that you hear when the guitarist (or any instrumentalist or vocalist) plays is called a fundamental. 

While (s)he plays, the string will also vibrate at half the wavelength, or twice the "amount of Hz" as the low C (About 262 Hz). This happens to make a higher C note. Unlike if the guitarist played the higher C while playing the lower C, this higher C isn't perceived as another pitch. A higher, indistinguishable frequency (pitch) that is created when a vocalist or musician plays a fundamental is called an overtone. 

The string will make more and more overtones at 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6 1/7, 1/8, 1/9, 1/10 and so on of the wavelength of the original pitch, and this pattern will extend infinitely. All of these vibrations create an overtone. These overtones tend to get quieter as they get higher in pitch, but there are fluctuations in their volumes from instrument to instrument. 

Ever wonder what makes a trumpet sound different from a vocalist sound different from a keyboard sound different from a guitar? The answer lies in how loud different overtones are. A trumpet may have a very loud 1/5 overtone, but very quiet 1/8 and 1/9 overtones (this is just hypothetical). Maybe Adele has a relatively loud 1/6 overtone, but a relatively quiet 1/4. Justin Bieber has very loud 1/1000000 overtone, which explains why he sounds like he hasn't gone through puberty. wink_face.gif

Another way to think of it would be that if we removed all overtones, all that would be left is a basic, fundamental pitch. Without overtones, all of these instruments would sound completely identical when playing the same pitch. Pretty neat, huh?

So the answer to your question of "What is the highest frequency that music stops at?" is a resounding "Never!" These indistinguishable frequencies continue on and on forever, far beyond the thresholds of human hearing or the capabilities of recording. 

Anyway, this guy explains it a lot better than I do.

A
 fun experiment you could try would be running your music through what is called a "low-pass filter". A low-pass filter reduces the volume (or even can completely cut out) of audio above a specified frequency. It only allows frequencies below said frequency to pass through, hence the name. Many can be installed in MediaMonkey or Winamp if you run either of those applications. Here's a link to one.

post #24 of 125

@CashNotCredit

Thanks for the article link!

post #25 of 125
In general harmonics become quieter with each level. After a couple of them, it doesn't matter much any more. Cymbals and triangles are exceptions to this. And the range of pianos or violins make the harmonic range higher. But overall high frequencies are overrated. Take your favorite music and filter above 12kHz. See what you find. Everyone talks about frequencies in theory. It doesn't amount to much in practice.

The gray lines in the chart above are important harmonics for each instrument. Black is the fundamental. Check it.
Edited by bigshot - 11/22/12 at 1:13am
post #26 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

In general harmonics become quieter with each level. After a couple of them, it doesn't matter much any more. Cymbals and triangles are exceptions to this. And the range of pianos or violins make the harmonic range higher. But overall high frequencies are overrated. Take your favorite music and filter above 12kHz. See what you find. Everyone talks about frequencies in theory. It doesn't amount to much in practice.
The gray lines in the chart above are important harmonics for each instrument. Black is the fundamental. Check it.

unfiltered vs 12khz filter
i feel that i am missing quite a lot of high frequencies when i remove the 12khz filter, so yes it does matter
are you referring to clssical music only?

post #27 of 125
I'm talking music. Try it.
post #28 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

I'm talking music. Try it.

i already tried it several times didn't i? confused.gif

post #29 of 125

Aphex Twin track was Ventolin. There was another old warp records track that played a continuous tone at about 12khz throughout and it was unbearable after around 30 seconds! Can;t remember what it was.

post #30 of 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

In general harmonics become quieter with each level. After a couple of them, it doesn't matter much any more. Cymbals and triangles are exceptions to this. And the range of pianos or violins make the harmonic range higher. But overall high frequencies are overrated. Take your favorite music and filter above 12kHz. See what you find. Everyone talks about frequencies in theory. It doesn't amount to much in practice.
The gray lines in the chart above are important harmonics for each instrument. Black is the fundamental. Check it.

I find that things sound drastically different, even at 16kHz.
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