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My attempt at removing the Sennheiser veil through equalization - Page 3

post #31 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post

you can get the Q701 for $240. 

yeah, that's quite expensive for me, especially where i am (160% of MSRP)

post #32 of 186

Well, the best thing to do is to use measurement microphones to check the frequency response, and then adjust the EQ until it is as flat as possible.

That is sort of what this software does: http://accudio.goldenears.net/

They have done measurements for many models of headphones, including the hd600, and have custom optimized EQ's for each. I've never actually used the app, so I have no idea how well it works, but they seem to know what they're doing.

 

As for EQ removing the veil, I see no reason why this would be any worse than buying an amp to do it. The music doesn't care whether or not the treble is boosted in the source, amp, or the headphone itself, so long as it is done properly. I think a lot of audiophiles avoid using EQ because it feels like cheating to them, or something. They'd rather buy a $5000 balanced tube amp that colors the sound just right, because that is their ultimate goal.. to spend a lot of money on stuff.


Edited by Eisenhower - 11/17/12 at 12:38pm
post #33 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eisenhower View Post

Well, the best thing to do is to use measurement microphones to check the frequency response, and then adjust the EQ until it is as flat as possible.

That is sort of what this software does: http://accudio.goldenears.net/

They have done measurements for many models of headphones, including the hd600, and have custom optimized EQ's for each. I've never actually used the app, so I have no idea how well it works, but they seem to know what they're doing.

 

As for EQ removing the veil, I see no reason why this would be any worse than buying an amp to do it. The music doesn't care whether or not the treble is boosted in the source, amp, or the headphone itself, so long as it is done properly. I think a lot of audiophiles avoid using EQ because it feels like cheating to them, or something. They'd rather buy a $5000 balanced tube amp that colors the sound just right, because that is their ultimate goal.. to spend a lot of money on stuff.

i was also wondering why do audiophiles generally despise the eqconfused.gif could it be because they see the eq as a 'controlled/uncontrolled distortion machine' or cause they don't know how to use it or cause it has something to do with ego? i know my friend wants to stay 'pure and neutral'. not sure if its cause he thinks his srh940 is perfectly flat or cause again he doesn't know how to use the eq.

post #34 of 186

I can see a few reasons why it may not be the best option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

i was also wondering why do audiophiles generally despise the eqconfused.gif could it be because they see the eq as a 'controlled/uncontrolled distortion machine' or cause they don't know how to use it or cause it has something to do with ego? i know my friend wants to stay 'pure and neutral'. not sure if its cause he thinks his srh940 is perfectly flat or cause again he doesn't know how to use the eq.

post #35 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post

I can see a few reasons why it may not be the best option.

 

Such as...?

Audio engineers and recording studios rely heavily on digital EQ for mixing. It is used on your music whether you like it or not.


Edited by Eisenhower - 11/17/12 at 1:27pm
post #36 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonb View Post

I can see a few reasons why it may not be the best option.

well all have our different preferences, until i hear actual distortions that outweigh the improvements i would still continue to use the eq
i would guess that the most common reason eq is not the option is because it is used improperly and causes the sound to sound wierd, therefore eq=bad in that sense


Edited by streetdragon - 11/17/12 at 1:37pm
post #37 of 186
post #38 of 186

hmm Eisenhower do you mostly use the graph to tune the eq or do you go by pure ear?

post #39 of 186

for me the biggest reason used to be that my sources didn't offer good EQ. And then if my sources did have EQ it would never be system wide. I do use a slight +2db bass boost on my Fiio E17 with my Q701, and that of course is system wide since its built into my amp. Of course when I use my GR01 alone with my iPhone 4 there is no system wide EQ.   

      Quote:

Originally Posted by Eisenhower View Post

 

Such as...?

Audio engineers and recording studios rely heavily on digital EQ for mixing. It is used on your music whether you like it or not.

post #40 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

hmm Eisenhower do you mostly use the graph to tune the eq or do you go by pure ear?

 

Well I am personally happy the stock sound signature from my hd600's. If I had the equipment, I would measure it and EQ accordingly, because I like a flat response (mostly on principle). 

Measuring by ear is good too, since ultimately you are the arbiter of your own taste. I have tweaked the EQ by ear occasionally if I am itching for more bass on recordings that are lacking low end, to great success. If you think the highs on your headphones are rolled off (aka it has a veil), just tweak the EQ and see if it improves.

But it is impossible to tweak the EQ by ear to get a flat response, unless you have insanely good perfect pitch.

post #41 of 186

Along the way from some Sennheiser HD515 just out of a CDplayer I came to the conclusion that EQ is compromising the sound of any given headphone.I have now the HE500 and LCD2Rev2 and instead of EQ I tweak it to my liking by experimenting with amps,cables and most importantly DACs and giving my brain enough time to get used to a sound signature.Works for me!

post #42 of 186

If you not Amping the Sennheisers like you should, there will be a veil whatever you do EQ or not. 

post #43 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

hmm Eisenhower do you mostly use the graph to tune the eq or do you go by pure ear?

Go by ear. Different FR plots will be produced as:

-they will use use different couplers, with their own deviations from neutrality.

-compensation curves for the human ear will be different, as what the tester sees is best

- headphones themselves can can their percieved response altered by shifting them around. Your position may not reflect their position, and the quality of pad seal

- Finally, cans themselves have product variations. Certain companies have tighter qc than others, but even those top- notch products can vary a couple of decibels from another model, even if the channel matching is tight.

Measurements should be seen as a guide here, to help pin down any major peaks and amplitude troughs and overall tilts in the FR. Ultimately, your ear is the arbiter in this capacity.
post #44 of 186

Do whatever sounds best to you. It is your listening experience, nobody else's. If it sounds good to you, then enjoy it. L3000.gif

post #45 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocity View Post

If you not Amping the Sennheisers like you should, there will be a veil whatever you do EQ or not. 

 

no

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