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[REVIEW] Audéo PFE232- Planx - Page 4

post #46 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by planx View Post

 

Software EQ kills it. I rely entirely on equipment and keeping things as hardware as possible. I'm just different that way, not saying that EQ is a bad thing. I just couldn't get good matching with the W4. The W4 didn't have the bass like the PFE232, treble, musicality, and the flexibility. The mids were good, not great (on both IEMs). If you want a linear IEM, why not go ER-4S? I can't think of anything else that gets the job done. Why pay good money for a W4 to get "neutral" with EQ?

 

The etys don't work with my ears at all.  I prefer not to use any eq either.  I'm sort of a purist if you will, but I had better results eqing the 4r.  However, I am one of the people who found the 232 sibilant under normal use.  Why pay to get netural with eq?  Because it is the only iem i've used that requires very little eq.  Everything else, and I mean everything, that I've tried is far from neutral. :-/  I probably won't have the w4 forever, but until i find something better, it is the best overall i've found.  I would honestly say neither are worth the price, except that there is nothing as good as them. ha.  So in that sense they are.  But they should both cost no more than $300 in my opinion.  But I can't listen to many of the lower iems.  I actually just ordered an over-ear hd600.  We'll see how that compares. :)

post #47 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by luisdent View Post

 

The etys don't work with my ears at all.  I prefer not to use any eq either.  I'm sort of a purist if you will, but I had better results eqing the 4r.  However, I am one of the people who found the 232 sibilant under normal use.  Why pay to get netural with eq?  Because it is the only iem i've used that requires very little eq.  Everything else, and I mean everything, that I've tried is far from neutral. :-/  I probably won't have the w4 forever, but until i find something better, it is the best overall i've found.  I would honestly say neither are worth the price, except that there is nothing as good as them. ha.  So in that sense they are.  But they should both cost no more than $300 in my opinion.  But I can't listen to many of the lower iems.  I actually just ordered an over-ear hd600.  We'll see how that compares. :)

 

From the looks of it, you will enjoy the HD600. I think darker signatures work better for you. TBH, I think the Ety HF would work perfectly if you haven't done so already. Cheers

post #48 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by luisdent View Post

When a headphone is truly flat every genre shines and sound proper.


No offense intended, but I don't really get this statement about "proper sound". I also disagree 100% that a flat sound is most beneficial to every genre. Saying that one way of listening to something is proper and another isn't seems silly to me. The proper way to listen to a piece of music is to listen to it with a sound signature that you most enjoy, whether it is "flat" or neutral, cold, warm, whatever the case may be. 

 

Anyways, not to get off track, this was a great review. Really makes me wish I could give an earphone like this a chance, unfortunately I don't think I'll ever be able to convince myself that spending so much on an IEM is a worthwhile investment. In the mean time I will enjoy the 232's younger sibling L3000.gif

post #49 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mani ATH 87 View Post


No offense intended, but I don't really get this statement about "proper sound". I also disagree 100% that a flat sound is most beneficial to every genre. Saying that one way of listening to something is proper and another isn't seems silly to me. The proper way to listen to a piece of music is to listen to it with a sound signature that you most enjoy, whether it is "flat" or neutral, cold, warm, whatever the case may be. 

 

Anyways, not to get off track, this was a great review. Really makes me wish I could give an earphone like this a chance, unfortunately I don't think I'll ever be able to convince myself that spending so much on an IEM is a worthwhile investment. In the mean time I will enjoy the 232's younger sibling L3000.gif

 

I disagree and agree.  It depends on what you want with your music.  I want to hear music the way the artist intended me to hear it.  That is ONLY possibly with a flat, neutral headphone.  They specifically use flat reference monitors for the exact reason of making their music sound consistent on as many listening devices as possible.  The closer your listening device is to flat, the closer you are to hearing the song as accurately and perfectly as possible.  In that regard, I disagree and think you should aim for flatness at all costs.

 

On the other hand, music is for enjoyment, so why would you listen to a flat headphone if you don't enjoy it?  So in that regard I agree.  Find a headphone you like the sound signature of and enjoy your music.  That truly is the point.

 

However, I really don't think a lot of people don't know what true flatness sounds like.  Sure, some may, but when you have true flatness you get the best of everything.  In an electronic song that was recorded with pounding bass and sparkly highs you get that.  With a piano song that was recorded with soothing mids you get that.  If you buy a headphone with boosted bass and treble you will never hear the piano with the soothing mids, because you will overshadow them with the bass and treble.  And vice versa.  If you get a mid centric headphone you will never hear the pounding bass and sparkly treble in the electronic music.

 

So people that focus on certain genres might like a V shaped headphone to get that bass and treble, however a flat headphone should give you what the song's real traits are.  So in essence, while it is completely the opinion of the user as to what "sounds" good to them, technically it would be like applying a permanent EQ to a headphone.  It's like your saying, I want everything to sound sparkly and bassy.  That is completely fine if that is your goal.  But technically speaking flat is in fact the most "proper" sound to be faithful to the recording and in the way I described it is the "only" sound signature that is "faithful" to every genre.

 

Photographs are the same way.  If you take an incredibly good photograph and frame it you have a piece of art that resemble the original thing photographed.  Some people might like to boost the contrast and add visual effects.  If they like that, that is completely fine as it is art.  But it is not accurate to the original.  That's all.  Take monitor calibration for instance.  Music is the same exact way.  Visual studios will go out of their way to calibrate their monitors and printers.  When they print a design they get extremely precise about the colors printing the way they look on the screen.  That is the way they designed it, and they want it to look that way on print.  It would be like buying the poster from them and asking them to color it differently.  Again, that is a personal preference, but I personally want to hear what was recorded the same way I would want to see what was designed.

 

:)  It's just a matter of preference.  Do you want an accurate portrayal of the recording as it was intended no matter what genre or song?  Or do you want the sound to have a certain coloring that you find more pleasing?  There isn't really a right way, but I personally think if most people heard a truly flat headphone they would find their favorite genres to be more revealing and fun to listen to.  I haven't found an IEM up to $500 that is even near flat in a way that is accurate to the recording.  Granted most recordings are made on speakers which don't translate perfectly to headphones, but nonetheless, they all seem to have some difference that makes them unfaithful to the original.  4r with eq is the closest i've heard, because the 4r has smooth transitioning between all frequencies, so once the frequencies are corrected with eq they are very seamless between each other.


Edited by luisdent - 2/10/13 at 2:49am
post #50 of 64

I was looking for prices on the PFE232.  Came across a website that said Audeo was going to stop making audio earphones, which they are.  Besides warranty issues, my concern is getting replacement foam tips.  Are there aftermarket ones for this earphone?  Or see if I can buy additional foam tips when I order (actually trying to source these now)?  Thanks.

post #51 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lageir View Post

I was looking for prices on the PFE232.  Came across a website that said Audeo was going to stop making audio earphones, which they are.  Besides warranty issues, my concern is getting replacement foam tips.  Are there aftermarket ones for this earphone?  Or see if I can buy additional foam tips when I order (actually trying to source these now)?  Thanks.

 

Well, other tips do fit on the PFE232. Comply and other silicone tips from other manufactures work as well. I just stick with Comply or stock silicone

post #52 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by lageir View Post

I was looking for prices on the PFE232.  Came across a website that said Audeo was going to stop making audio earphones, which they are.  Besides warranty issues, my concern is getting replacement foam tips.  Are there aftermarket ones for this earphone?  Or see if I can buy additional foam tips when I order (actually trying to source these now)?  Thanks.

 

The westone 4r tips all fit the 232.  They're a  bit tighter, but I had no problem getting them on.

post #53 of 64

Thank you both.

 

Also had a brainstorm and actually went to the Audeo site (US and UK) to see if they sold extra tips.  They do, so they're available.  But neither ship to Australia so figuring out how to extra originals otherwise the options you all suggested should be good.

 

Thanks.

post #54 of 64

Would any of you here recommend buying the audio filter tips or just stick with the Comply ones?  Thanks.

post #55 of 64
Thread Starter 

It all depends on preference. I don't like comply that much because the treble seems to be toned down a notch, but the comfort is excellent. Silicone sounds better but does a nice job as well in the comfort department. I've heard good results with other tips and I'm sure that's all valid info as well. I think someone else mentioned Sony Hybrids

post #56 of 64

Thanks for answering.

 

I'm new to buying this quality earphones and had no idea that the tips could make such a big difference to the sound.  I thought they were really just there to keep them from falling out of your ears.  LIve and learn I guess.

post #57 of 64
Thread Starter 

They don't make massive differences, but they do make significant ones. People like Comply, others don't. Same story with every other tip. However, the stock tips on the PFE232 is pretty good so you should be okay, unless you want something else. Cheers

post #58 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by planx View Post

They don't make massive differences, but they do make significant ones. People like Comply, others don't. Same story with every other tip. However, the stock tips on the PFE232 is pretty good so you should be okay, unless you want something else. Cheers

 

Silicone almost exclusively has better treble performance, and they are easy to clean/last long.  Comply isolate better and sometimes sound smooth and have a bit better bass due to isolation.  They don't last as long though and can be a pain in situations where you reinsert your earphones a lot.  I find the silicone just as comfortable personally.

post #59 of 64

Thanks for the review! It makes me want to try these for myself.

post #60 of 64
Thread Starter 

If you're really interested in them, now is a good time to buy them as Phonak is discontinuing all IEMs

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