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The Reality Distortion Field, finally, has been located - Page 3

post #31 of 54

I suppose we can't overlook the convenience factor. On the other hand, unless you absolutely need it to come out of the original carton and/or don't have access to water, there's no way it can be a good value simply from the standpoint that it will always be cheaper to make it yourself. Maybe they just don't like having to stir something together in a cup? I wonder how they drink their Ovaltine. smile.gif

 

That said, you bring up a good point about the health angle. They do point this out all over the carton, and you've pretty much summed up their reasoning. I think the whole thing is brilliant and at the same time it just makes me shake my head. Of course it will be healthier than regular orange juice from a pure calorie content standpoint. When you water something down, it'll have less of everything than whatever it was you started with.

 

Like I said, brilliant. They take the same product, water it down so it costs them theoretically 42% of what it would cost to make the same volume of normal orange juice (minus the advertising and package design budget--which eventually get paid off, the nominal cost for the water, the cost of the sweetener, etc.), sell it for presumably more than 42% of the cost of normal OJ, promote it in a trendy, health conscious way, and rake in the bucks.

 

And consumers, merely reading the carton, think "Healthy! Good! Bleat!" and buy it. The box says its good, and of course, the almighty box is always right.

post #32 of 54
They put it in the Internet; you can't put anything on the Internet that isn't true. wink.gif
post #33 of 54

That's true.... thas whys we all listen to beats... dey's the bestest.

post #34 of 54
Thread Starter 

On a related note.

 

How many of you've actually managed to convince someone to make a technically better decision?

 

In other words, how to repel the reality distortion field? Most cases I find it a lost cause.


Edited by proton007 - 10/30/12 at 5:41pm
post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

On a related note.

 

How many of you've actually managed to convince someone to make a technically better decision?

 

In other words, how to repel the reality distortion field? Most cases I find it a lost cause.

 

It's very, very difficult. Sadly, I get the impression that I didn't inspire them to make an informed decision so much as simply became a stronger voice at that particular moment so they listened to me instead of the other people.

post #36 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argyris View Post

 

It's very, very difficult. Sadly, I get the impression that I didn't inspire them to make an informed decision so much as simply became a stronger voice at that particular moment so they listened to me instead of the other people.

 

frown.gif

I feel the same, but its easy to follow rather than take one's own decisions.

And worse when one "thinks" one is taking a decision, when its all a setup, when the choice has already been made.


Edited by proton007 - 10/30/12 at 6:11pm
post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

 

frown.gif

I feel the same, but its easy to follow rather than take one's own decisions.

And worse when one "thinks" one is taking a decision, when its all a setup, when the choice has already been made.

 

I guess ignorance is bliss. It's easier not getting into the knotty details and just letting other people make the tough calls. Also, choice scares some people. They'd rather think they didn't really have a choice, or believe it when advertisers present the market as having only one serious choice because otherwise they'd have to sift through places like Head-Fi and read endless conflicting opinions. And, between you and me (and everybody on Head-Fi, of course), sometimes I wish there really was a be-all, end-all choice that I could make.

 

But there isn't. All headphones suck in some way. There's just some that suck less.

post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argyris View Post

 

I guess ignorance is bliss. It's easier not getting into the knotty details and just letting other people make the tough calls. Also, choice scares some people. They'd rather think they didn't really have a choice, or believe it when advertisers present the market as having only one serious choice because otherwise they'd have to sift through places like Head-Fi and read endless conflicting opinions. And, between you and me (and everybody on Head-Fi, of course), sometimes I wish there really was a be-all, end-all choice that I could make.

 

But there isn't. All headphones suck in some way. There's just some that suck less.

there was an experiment carried out by some researches. customers we're allowed to sample 5 different flavours of jam at a supermarket. number of purcahaces were recorded at the end of the day. the next day however, they let the customers try 17 different flavours. surprisingly the number of sales was significantly less than the previous day.
it was later concluded that the increase in number of choices would cause the customer to feel that they 'lost' more since they could not buy all the flavours, instead of the 5 where they 'lost' less and felt better after their purchases

now back to headphones, with the odinary consumer only knowing Skullcandy, Beats,Mosnter, Bose, and maybe Soul and Sol, its an easier purchase for them instead of the many other possible choices we know of like Sennheiser,Shure,Audio Technica,Denon,Hifiman,Audeze,Sony,Klipsch,Fischer Audio,Beyerdynamic,Superlux,Goldring,Grado,AKG,Eymotic,Westone,AIAIAI,Allesandro,Jays,Stax,Final Audio,V-Moda,Monoprice and others. (this could be tongue twister!)

this immense range of choice offered by audiophile brands simply put off the average consumer, and thus need a voice. a voice to tell them what sounds nice, what has bass, and what is respected, and that voice, is the Dr.Dre. it all makes sense that everyone will rave about his products, especially when most people only listen to bass and one pair of headphones

post #39 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

there was an experiment carried out by some researches. customers we're allowed to sample 5 different flavours of jam at a supermarket. number of purcahaces were recorded at the end of the day. the next day however, they let the customers try 17 different flavours. surprisingly the number of sales was significantly less than the previous day.
it was later concluded that the increase in number of choices would cause the customer to feel that they 'lost' more since they could not buy all the flavours, instead of the 5 where they 'lost' less and felt better after their purchases

now back to headphones, with the odinary consumer only knowing Skullcandy, Beats,Mosnter, Bose, and maybe Soul and Sol, its an easier purchase for them instead of the many other possible choices we know of like Sennheiser,Shure,Audio Technica,Denon,Hifiman,Audeze,Sony,Klipsch,Fischer Audio,Beyerdynamic,Superlux,Goldring,Grado,AKG,Eymotic,Westone,AIAIAI,Allesandro,Jays,Stax,Final Audio,V-Moda,Monoprice and others. (this could be tongue twister!)

this immense range of choice offered by audiophile brands simply put off the average consumer, and thus need a voice. a voice to tell them what sounds nice, what has bass, and what is respected, and that voice, is the Dr.Dre. it all makes sense that everyone will rave about his products, especially when most people only listen to bass and one pair of headphones

 

Honestly, the next time I hear someone saying noise cancelling headphones are better (and Bose is better than everything) because they're more expensive, I'm just going to shut up. I don't think I can take it anymore.

post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

Honestly, the next time I hear someone saying noise cancelling headphones are better (and Bose is better than everything) because they're more expensive, I'm just going to shut up. I don't think I can take it anymore.

The worst is if you do a lot of air travel. I have actually had Bose owners lean over to me and tell me that I would be much better off if I had Bose NC headphones than my IEMs. I usually just point at my ears and say "I can't hear you" wink.gif
post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


The worst is if you do a lot of air travel. I have actually had Bose owners lean over to me and tell me that I would be much better off if I had Bose NC headphones than my IEMs. I usually just point at my ears and say "I can't hear you" wink.gif

 

If they didn't see me blatantly hooking my IEMs up to my player, I'd tell them to speak up, point at my ears, and say that my hearing aid was on the fritz. Then I'd watch them squirm and try to work out how they could smooth over the offense. It would work especially well with something like a PFE since Phonak also makes hearing aids, and they have a bit of that aesthetic going on.

post #42 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post


The worst is if you do a lot of air travel. I have actually had Bose owners lean over to me and tell me that I would be much better off if I had Bose NC headphones than my IEMs. I usually just point at my ears and say "I can't hear you" wink.gif

 

Someone once told me my headphones suck because I find my external DAC better than a laptop. What a joke.

post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

 

Someone once told me my headphones suck because I find my external DAC better than a laptop. What a joke.


Tell them that your DAC is an "ultra 3D surround simulator" that is only currently only available in Japan and costs $799. I bet they'll go out and try to buy your DAC.

As for helping people to get a better product, the key requirement is to realise that not everyone is your "typical" audiophile that reads measurements. Most people think all headphones sound the same and they're just trying to buy swag/class/indie-ness in the form of two cups and a headband. To steer people in the right direction one must show something that'll appeal to them. If you were to tell a mother that you spent $10000 on your SR009 setup and you recommend the HD598 for her son, she'll probably think you're crazy, however if you tell her that you're a audio enthusiast and your recommend the skullcandy aviator, which is popular with kids, then chances are she'll listen to you.

post #44 of 54

Funny you mention the Aviators, since I've been seeing quite a few pairs around campus these days. Assuming the hype is true (and that these things are pretty good), at least these kids got what they paid for audio-wise, AND they got a cool looking set to boot.

 

It IS possible to get both. Just not very common, alas.

post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetdragon View Post

there was an experiment carried out by some researches. customers we're allowed to sample 5 different flavours of jam at a supermarket. number of purcahaces were recorded at the end of the day. the next day however, they let the customers try 17 different flavours. surprisingly the number of sales was significantly less than the previous day.

it was later concluded that the increase in number of choices would cause the customer to feel that they 'lost' more since they could not buy all the flavours, instead of the 5 where they 'lost' less and felt better after their purchases


now back to headphones, with the odinary consumer only knowing Skullcandy, Beats,Mosnter, Bose, and maybe Soul and Sol, its an easier purchase for them instead of the many other possible choices we know of like Sennheiser,Shure,Audio Technica,Denon,Hifiman,Audeze,Sony,Klipsch,Fischer Audio,Beyerdynamic,Superlux,Goldring,Grado,AKG,Eymotic,Westone,AIAIAI,Allesandro,Jays,Stax,Final Audio,V-Moda,Monoprice and others. (this could be tongue twister!)


this immense range of choice offered by audiophile brands simply put off the average consumer, and thus need a voice. a voice to tell them what sounds nice, what has bass, and what is respected, and that voice, is the Dr.Dre. it all makes sense that everyone will rave about his products, especially when most people only listen to bass and one pair of headphones

Sounds fair enough. I know I've felt like Mr Burns buying Ketchup a time or two when selected with a lot of options. I think the only reason "we" can avoid that is because we have the frame of reference to narrow down the field - for example I can eliminate a number of those brands right here and now for a variety of reasons based on experience, and end up with maybe four or five total contenders, not four or five HUNDRED like you'll get if you just jump on Amazon and say "headphones."

Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

The worst is if you do a lot of air travel. I have actually had Bose owners lean over to me and tell me that I would be much better off if I had Bose NC headphones than my IEMs. I usually just point at my ears and say "I can't hear you" wink.gif

That's just rude.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Argyris View Post

If they didn't see me blatantly hooking my IEMs up to my player, I'd tell them to speak up, point at my ears, and say that my hearing aid was on the fritz. Then I'd watch them squirm and try to work out how they could smooth over the offense. It would work especially well with something like a PFE since Phonak also makes hearing aids, and they have a bit of that aesthetic going on.

That's just hilarious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

Someone once told me my headphones suck because I find my external DAC better than a laptop. What a joke.

That's just ludicrous.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parall3l View Post


Tell them that your DAC is an "ultra 3D surround simulator" that is only currently only available in Japan and costs $799. I bet they'll go out and try to buy your DAC.


As for helping people to get a better product, the key requirement is to realise that not everyone is your "typical" audiophile that reads measurements. Most people think all headphones sound the same and they're just trying to buy swag/class/indie-ness in the form of two cups and a headband. To steer people in the right direction one must show something that'll appeal to them. If you were to tell a mother that you spent $10000 on your SR009 setup and you recommend the HD598 for her son, she'll probably think you're crazy, however if you tell her that you're a audio enthusiast and your recommend the skullcandy aviator, which is popular with kids, then chances are she'll listen to you.


This too. The biggun is the bold part. It's not even "sound the same" it's "are interchangeable and the same item" - there is no complex schema associated with them. Reminds me of an old game called Apple Learner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argyris View Post

It IS possible to get both. Just not very common, alas.

I think it depends on your fashion aesthetic (or lack thereof?) - I happen to think most all of my headphones look "cool." Then again, I don't consider headphones a "fashion item" nor do I wear them out and about (I have probably the most generic looking pair of IEMs ever made, especially since the paint wore off).
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