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Questions about ripping CD's

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm trying to rip CD's using EAC. I want to rip both WAV and MP3 CBR 320 and I have some questions. 

 

- Ripping wav, it just shows "Track 1, 2.." ect, is there a way to make it name them correctly?

- How do I compress to MP3? I tried some guides and I can't really get it to work

 

How do EAC and FHG compare? I find it much easier to just rip this from WMP, but I've been reading that EAC is much better. 

post #2 of 12

Now sure about the EAC questions, but as far as WAV goes...it's not a taggable format. I'd rip to FLAC, ALAC, or AIFF if you want to properly tag it. 

 

I rip to AIFF. It's a perfect copy like WAV but it's taggable.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuzziekiwi View Post

I'm trying to rip CD's using EAC. I want to rip both WAV and MP3 CBR 320 and I have some questions. 

 

- Ripping wav, it just shows "Track 1, 2.." ect, is there a way to make it name them correctly?

- How do I compress to MP3? I tried some guides and I can't really get it to work

 

How do EAC and FHG compare? I find it much easier to just rip this from WMP, but I've been reading that EAC is much better. 

post #3 of 12

If you are looking for an easy to use secure ripper, try CUERipper.

 

I would be ripping to one of the popular lossess formats like FLAC or ALAC. I wouldn't go AIFF unless you absolutely need it for a certain application. Qualitywise FLAC, ALAC and AIFF are the same, but with FLAC and ALAC you will save some disk space.

post #4 of 12

I agree. If I weren't fairly dedicated to AIFF already I'd probably go back to ALAC. But I mentioned it because it's a taggable version of WAV.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by A_Man_Eating_Duck View Post

If you are looking for an easy to use secure ripper, try CUERipper.

 

I would be ripping to one of the popular lossess formats like FLAC or ALAC. I wouldn't go AIFF unless you absolutely need it for a certain application. Qualitywise FLAC, ALAC and AIFF are the same, but with FLAC and ALAC you will save some disk space.

post #5 of 12

http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57539761-285/how-to-rip-music-cds-to-flac-and-mp3-at-the-same-time/

 

Just select WAV instead of FLAC. DBpoweramp costs money but has a free trial.

post #6 of 12

Most todays ripping software is able to rip a CD bit perfect.

In case of WMP, set it to secure mode for best results.

 

However, dedicated ripping software like dBpoweramp or EAC support AccurateRip.

They compare the rip with the AccurateRip database.

This will tell you explicitly if your rip is perfect or not.

 

If CD is severely scratched, dedicated rippers might have an edge as e.g. dBpoweramp reads a sector up to 64 times to find out the best possible result.

 

You can rip to e.g. FLAC and MP3 at the same time.

Most people do because they want a lossless format for use at home and a lossy version for the portable.

The drawback is you have to maintain 2 libraries.

Better rip to lossless and use transcoding (converting to a lossless format on the fly) when syncing to a portable. Media players like e.g. JRiver support this.

 

Contrary to popular belief, WAV is taggable. The problem is the standard supports very few tags of relevance for media players.

Some programs resolve this by writing ID3 tags in a info chunk.

As this is a non-standard practice, you have problems when using other software.

Programs known to me supporting this method are

  • dBpoweramp
  • Foobar
  • JRiver Media Center
  • MusiCHI
  • MusicBee (partial)

 

I prefer dBpoweramp

  • Fast
  • Easy to configure
  • AccurateRip
  • You can choose between 4 internet databases for meta data
  • Reliable
  • Excellent format converter.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks. I'm using dbPoweramp now. 

post #8 of 12

I know this thread is two days old but I'm about to buy two CD's and have a stupid question: the quality of your dvd burner doesn't matter does it? also If I'm buying a CD from a smaller artist that released his album online as 160kbps mp3s what are the chances that he just used the 160kbps files as the source for the CD? Thanks for any help I get with these noob questions.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by linglingjr View Post

I know this thread is two days old but I'm about to buy two CD's and have a stupid question: the quality of your dvd burner doesn't matter does it? also If I'm buying a CD from a smaller artist that released his album online as 160kbps mp3s what are the chances that he just used the 160kbps files as the source for the CD? Thanks for any help I get with these noob questions.

No, it doesn't matter as long as you have an error checking ripper.


Rather than rely on probability, see if you can email that artist and ask. Smaller independent bands will usually get back to you.


Edited by chewy4 - 11/2/12 at 3:39pm
post #10 of 12

Ok im coming in really late but I sometimes burn a brand new cd onto itunes using its ripper with auto correction and going alac but still I sometimes get artifacts.. Im guessing my external burner is off??? also I want to start using EAC but I dont know how to..will it rip using alac because I just want to rip them alac put them in a folder and transfer them to itunes..? Finally what are good external burners all the threads on here are from 2003 for burners :)


Edited by Karnitool12 - 5/11/13 at 2:43pm
post #11 of 12
Get Max. It's free and has many rip options (I have Mac version). XLD also very good.
Look at BestBuy site for burners.
Edited by Mambosenior - 5/12/13 at 4:05pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karnitool12 View Post

Ok im coming in really late but I sometimes burn a brand new cd onto itunes using its ripper with auto correction and going alac but still I sometimes get artifacts.. Im guessing my external burner is off??? also I want to start using EAC but I dont know how to..will it rip using alac because I just want to rip them alac put them in a folder and transfer them to itunes..? Finally what are good external burners all the threads on here are from 2003 for burners smily_headphones1.gif

You can use EAC to create alac files http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=EAC_and_ALAC

When you say "good external burners" do you really mean USB or eSATA optical drives? You don't need to be able to write (burn) to be able to read (rip). There are lots of great external optical drives but also a few that are basically useless for secure rip of audio CDs. The difference usually comes down to whether the drive's cache can be ignored: if there is a read error your ripping app needs to try again by re-reading that sector of the disc; if it only re-reads faulty data in the cache the rip is useless but if it can physically re-read the disc then you either a) get a good rip or b) at least know that you didn't.

When looking at a drive to buy you can check its model number against the accuraterip offset database at http://www.accuraterip.com/driveoffsets.htm If it's in there it will almost certainly work really well.

If you're looking to buy a drive just for audio CD ripping then you can pick up some really cheap used hardware. Once you set up a ripper/encoder everything is automated so (unless you're doing big batches) it hardly matters if the task takes 1 minute or 5 or 25. This means you can pick up something for pennies that will work perfectly if maybe slowly. I recall the first Pioneer DVD write capable drives were good audio rippers. I also used a really cheap Samsung DVD reader which didn't cache audio data and did secure rips really fast. These days I use the OEM Hitachi SATA DVDRW that came in my budget PC. While there is no guarantee, most drives will be fine and if yours isn't then it need only cost pennies to try a few until you have one that is. More likely is that you only need to use a better ripping application.
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