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Martin Logan Mikros 90 On-Ear Headphones - Page 35

post #511 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trunks159 View Post

The subbass is there. A headphone with no subbass is basically any open headphone under $300. The HD598, DT880, MA900, Grado Prestige are all loved, and they have little subbass.

Of course a song without bass wouldn't sound great, but what would a song without mids sound like; or a song without treble? Bass is important obviously, but it is of least importance compared to its competition.

I think neither is "more " important, you cant dissect music that way, its the entire spectrum as accurately reproduced as possible, the trick is finding that mix that makes you happy, and obviously bass is lower on your pick list, understandable, because so much of the beauty of music is in the mid range, voices and many acoustic instruments, and who could live without cymbals and and the things that make music sparkle. The more tightly all these are integrated the better, and for me the Mikros is doing that for me. My Grado 325i's just don't  have the low level detail like the ML's, and I have modified mine slightly trying to improve the bass / sub-bass  and its very apparent that the driver can't handle those low notes and starts to break up, the bass gets mushy with no defined edges, just a mess.

post #512 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trunks159 View Post

I never thought I could like these so much after my first impressions. I still deny burn in, but my ears have done quite a bit of adjusting. I can not take these things off!

These things will do that to you, I'm re-exploring my music collection, and having way to much fun !! Cheers Trunks !

post #513 of 5910
beerchug.gif
post #514 of 5910
Welcome to the dark side😁
post #515 of 5910
Round 3.5:
Ive tryed my best to define the tuning of the ML,but they're too allusive. The midrange is emphasized, as is the treble, but the bass is not left out.

FC300 vs ML:
BASS: Im sorry but I'm going to give it to the FC300.. They have more subbass, and the bass is distributed more around the ear, instead of just on or in it. Its close. The FC300 has more bass though.

MIDS: The ML wins in the mids. Nice, lush warm sound, better vocals,, more presence. The FC300 is still more spaceous, so the voices are more separated from the rest of the music. Preference really (the ML may have a tiny bit too much mids for me).

Highs: The ML wins in detail while the FC300 wins in neutrality. I can't even tell you which I prefer.

SOUNDSTAGE: Easily the FC300.

Detail: The ML wins.

Build: ML is like unbreakable. The more complex design and inferior design materials work against the FC300. The FC300 is built well though, and they look better.

Comfort: FC300 wins slightly.

I enjoy my music with both, though ive been using the FC300 for 3 Weeks, so I've already adjusted.

Dismiss Any Typos! This was done on my phone using Swype and autocorrect.
post #516 of 5910
Keep using them and they will keep amusing you😎
post #517 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by LimeANite View Post
 

Could be recordings, but I've always been under the impression that Moving Pictures was a pretty well-recorded album, and Tom Sawyer was one of the more notable songs that sounded really thin.  This is supported by the fact that it sounded much more full through my GR07s (non-BE), which are a fairly neutral IEM.  To me, it sounds like there's a region of the bass that's missing.  Messing with EQ settings suggests that it's the sub-bass - mid-bass seems to be pretty good - but it's entirely possible that the last several years using more or less nothing but the D2000s has colored my perception of my music.

 

I'm going to give these a few more days before I make a decision - the place I got them from has a 60-day return policy, so I've got some time to mess around with things.

 

Sadly no, Moving Pictures is not really a good recording, no Rush albums are as far as I am concerned. Some are passable, but most are really not very good. I have been listening to Rush since the 1980s and I have seen them in concert 9 times now, owned every album on vinyl and CD, so I am very familiar with Rush. I used to think that Moving Pictures was well recorded, but sadly that illusion has been shattered. The Mobile Fidelity remastering helps and brings the album closer to well-done, but it is still grainy and with plenty of midrange washing of the sound. Bass needs some help as well. Not anything as bad as Presto mind you, or Roll The Bones, those were flat and reverb filled recordings, much like Asia's self titled album. Great music, crappy recordings, or at least so-so recordings.

post #518 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Defender View Post
 

 

Sadly no, Moving Pictures is not really a good recording, no Rush albums are as far as I am concerned. Some are passable, but most are really not very good. I have been listening to Rush since the 1980s and I have seen them in concert 9 times now, owned every album on vinyl and CD, so I am very familiar with Rush. I used to think that Moving Pictures was well recorded, but sadly that illusion has been shattered. The Mobile Fidelity remastering helps and brings the album closer to well-done, but it is still grainy and with plenty of midrange washing of the sound. Bass needs some help as well. Not anything as bad as Presto mind you, or Roll The Bones, those were flat and reverb filled recordings, much like Asia's self titled album. Great music, crappy recordings, or at least so-so recordings.

Ah, ok.  Well, consider my illusions shattered then as well.  It's an album that's sounded pretty darn good on every other set of headphones I've owned, but your observations match mine almost to a tee on a different setup, so I'm inclined to believe that it's the recording, not the headphones.  I guess the Mikros are a two-edged sword: highly revealing, but so much so that music you thought was good  turns out to be crap.  That would definitely explain why I've been getting the feeling that these are almost bipolar - one song sounds fantastic, and the next sounds like it's coming out of a tin can.  Great for picking out excellent recordings and listening to those, but not so great for relaxed listening.  

 

I'm thinking more and more that these just won't serve my purposes.  I'm looking more for something that I can plug into a source and listen to with minimal adjustments rather than a super-detailed, almost analytical phone.  It's a shame, because when these are good, they're really good, but give them a bad recording and they'll make your ears bleed.

post #519 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by LimeANite View Post
 

Ah, ok.  Well, consider my illusions shattered then as well.  It's an album that's sounded pretty darn good on every other set of headphones I've owned, but your observations match mine almost to a tee on a different setup, so I'm inclined to believe that it's the recording, not the headphones.  I guess the Mikros are a two-edged sword: highly revealing, but so much so that music you thought was good  turns out to be crap.  That would definitely explain why I've been getting the feeling that these are almost bipolar - one song sounds fantastic, and the next sounds like it's coming out of a tin can.  Great for picking out excellent recordings and listening to those, but not so great for relaxed listening.  

 

I'm thinking more and more that these just won't serve my purposes.  I'm looking more for something that I can plug into a source and listen to with minimal adjustments rather than a super-detailed, almost analytical phone.  It's a shame, because when these are good, they're really good, but give them a bad recording and they'll make your ears bleed.


That should be the case for any decent headphone, the more detail they can present runs a risk and reward for you. Reward if the recording is good, and punishment if the recording is not good. You might want to consider something with a slightly warm presentation that might smooth over some of the rougher edges for you, or you could use a parametric EQ with the Mikros to soften them. Essentially when I listen to rock I know a huge amount of the material is going to sound pretty bad, sometimes you get lucky, but most rock and metal will punish you a little. I have in recent years found myself searching for well recorded music that I can enjoy, and frequently this means stepping away from rock. I have found and enjoy a great deal of electronica and world music. There are some good rock recordings of course, but when you get screaming guitars and driving bass lines with slamming drums, you get a wall of sound that bleeds into itself. I think by definition high energy rock recordings are significantly disadvantaged from the get go. Try your Mikros with a good parametric EQ set to take some of the edge away. You can get a free 30 day trial of JRiver Media Center and install the free and very easy to use EasyQ equalizer plugin.

post #520 of 5910

I'm mainly using these out of a tablet, so JRiver isn't really an option.  I'm using Poweramp, which has a pretty good EQ, and I've managed to get them to the point where they're bearable most of the time, but some songs occasionally sneak through that can't be helped.  Apart from that, I generally prefer not to have to use an EQ, especially one as heavy as the one I'm using on these - it usually  means that I should have a different pair of headphones.  Your suggestion of something with a warmer sound signature is pretty much the direction I was leaning - back to the hunt, I suppose.  I'm looking at the P5 (wish these were cheaper - $200 used is a bit of a stretch), HD-25, and DT1350.  Anyone used these who can compare them to the Mikros (or D2k, GR07, or Pro DJ100)?

post #521 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by LimeANite View Post
 

I'm mainly using these out of a tablet, so JRiver isn't really an option.  I'm using Poweramp, which has a pretty good EQ, and I've managed to get them to the point where they're bearable most of the time, but some songs occasionally sneak through that can't be helped.  Apart from that, I generally prefer not to have to use an EQ, especially one as heavy as the one I'm using on these - it usually  means that I should have a different pair of headphones.  Your suggestion of something with a warmer sound signature is pretty much the direction I was leaning - back to the hunt, I suppose.  I'm looking at the P5 (wish these were cheaper - $200 used is a bit of a stretch), HD-25, and DT1350.  Anyone used these who can compare them to the Mikros (or D2k, GR07, or Pro DJ100)?

SFW had a huge collection of headphones, not the ones you listed, but some that were also warm and possibly your preferred sound sig. Let him receive them and hopefully, he'll be able to point you in the right direction.

post #522 of 5910
To my ears these are neutral 😎
post #523 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Defender View Post
 

 

Sadly no, Moving Pictures is not really a good recording, no Rush albums are as far as I am concerned. Some are passable, but most are really not very good. I have been listening to Rush since the 1980s and I have seen them in concert 9 times now, owned every album on vinyl and CD, so I am very familiar with Rush. I used to think that Moving Pictures was well recorded, but sadly that illusion has been shattered. The Mobile Fidelity remastering helps and brings the album closer to well-done, but it is still grainy and with plenty of midrange washing of the sound. Bass needs some help as well. Not anything as bad as Presto mind you, or Roll The Bones, those were flat and reverb filled recordings, much like Asia's self titled album. Great music, crappy recordings, or at least so-so recordings.

 

No 80's pop/rock recordings are going to sound like Patricia Barber. That's just the way it is. And if they did, they would be unlistenable.

post #524 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beagle View Post
 

 

No 80's pop/rock recordings are going to sound like Patricia Barber. That's just the way it is. And if they did, they would be unlistenable.


I don't know about that. Dire Straits always took great care over the production process and some of the latest remasters are quite phenomenal.

post #525 of 5910
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochill View Post

To my ears these are neutral 😎

I'm of the same opinion.  Neutral, maybe with a slight treble emphasis.  I've just  realized that this, combined with the high level of detail these have, just doesn't work for me and my music collection.  While I do have some well-recorded stuff, I also have enough music that isn't so well recorded that I'd still like to be able to listen to without feeling like someone is jabbing a screwdriver into my eardrums.  And for that, I think I need something with a warmer, more forgiving sound signature.

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