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Pictures of Your Portable Rig (part XVI) - Page 712

post #10666 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by lin0003 View Post

What are the benefits of 3D printing exactly? 
Affordable, relatively easy to use, can build many different things with it, and it's basically a 1-man operation.
post #10667 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post


Affordable, relatively easy to use, can build many different things with it, and it's basically a 1-man operation.

But if I'm not wrong there are no sonic benefits right? 

post #10668 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by lin0003 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Affordable, relatively easy to use, can build many different things with it, and it's basically a 1-man operation.
But if I'm not wrong there are no sonic benefits right? 
It depends on how it's implemented. The MrSpeakers Alpha Dog replaces the stock Fostex T50RP earcup with a 3D printed one, which alters the material and thus dampening and internal reverberations typically found in an earcup.
http://www.head-fi.org/t/676095/mrspeakers-alpha-dog-revealed-the-worlds-first-production-3d-printed-headphones/630#post_9707277

A similar thing happened with the Sennheiser HD25-I-II and Amperior, in theory.
http://www.innerfidelity.com/content/most-excellent-sennheiser-amperior-and-hd-25-1-ii
post #10669 of 13545
Is the whole iem printed or just drivers or housing?
post #10670 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by indieman View Post

Is the whole iem printed or just drivers or housing?

That's a good question actually. While my initial reaction is to say housing only, I did see that Smith&Wesson produced the world's first 3d-printed metal gun (model 1911) so 3d printing the driver is theoretically possible. Curious about this as well.

post #10671 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMiddleSky View Post
 

The first ever 3D printing IEM with fully titanium housing: Final Audio Lab1

 

Final Audio Lab1

Interesting.
What are the IEMs lying on btw? :D
Looks like fur...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by indieman View Post

Is the whole iem printed or just drivers or housing?

I don't think that titanium is a material suitable for 3D printing.
So maybe the drivers? Not so sure about that either....

post #10672 of 13545
Y'all should do a simple Google search sometimes. XD
http://final-audio-design.com/en/archives/2058
Quote:
C Titanium 64 housing formed via 3D printer

Shapes formed using a 3D printer don’t just appear with the touch of a button.
Different knowhow is especially necessary at each point when it comes to forms created from metal. Each point is quantified and accumulated as explicit knowledge. But when it comes to deciding how to go about combining all of this different knowhow and in what order of precedence, then what is necessary is the intuition of the craftsman. Rather than rendering the work of the craftsman unnecessary, shaping metal using a 3D printer necessitates there being human resources that could be termed digital craftsmen, in that they consider the output data to be created that takes into account the shape of the finished product, the cost, precision, the smoothness of the surface and a number of other elements. To reach the best output data for the housing here, we trialed a great number of prototypes.
...
And finishing off the surface is not easy either. The 3D printer irradiates metal powder over an extremely small area with a laser, melting it and then hardening it over and over so that the form is created. Owing to this, the surface is pocked with the marks left by the laser’s irradiation and has a rough finish. Polishing this up requires just as much knowhow as shaping the object does. It was thought that polishing it to the degree that its precision as a product was maintained was impossible. Here, with the cooperation of a coordinator specializing in specially-processed metals, we combined the skills of the craftsmen in many ways and with the output from the 3D printer, realized a beautifully polished finish for the titanium 64 (usually a hard metal to polish) housing.

Since they don't mention it anywhere, Wikipedia is also very useful sometimes. wink.gif
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium_alloy
Quote:

Grade 5, also known as Ti6Al4V, Ti-6Al-4V or Ti 6-4, is the most commonly used alloy. It has a chemical composition of 6% aluminium, 4% vanadium, 0.25% (maximum) iron, 0.2% (maximum) oxygen, and the remainder titanium. It is significantly stronger than commercially pure titanium while having the same stiffness and thermal properties (excluding thermal conductivity, which is about 60% lower in Grade 5 Ti than in CP Ti). Among its many advantages, it is heat treatable. This grade is an excellent combination of strength, corrosion resistance, weld and fabricability.

"This alpha-beta alloy is the workhorse alloy of the titanium industry. The alloy is fully heat treatable in section sizes up to 15mm and is used up to approximately 400°C (750°F). Since it is the most commonly used alloy – over 70% of all alloy grades melted are a sub-grade of Ti6Al4V, its uses span many aerospace airframe and engine component uses and also major non-aerospace applications in the marine, offshore and power generation industries in particular."

"Applications: Blades, discs, rings, airframes, fasteners, components. Vessels, cases, hubs, forgings. Biomedical implants."

Generally, Ti-6Al-4V is used in applications up to 400 degrees Celsius. It has a density of roughly 4420 kg/m3, Young's modulus of 115 GPa, and tensile strength of 1000 MPa. By comparison, annealed type 316 stainless steel has a density of 8000 kg/m3, modulus of 193 GPa, and tensile strength of only 570 MPa. And tempered 6061 aluminium alloy has 2700 kg/m3, 69 GPa, and 310 MPa, respectively.

Edited by miceblue - 3/15/14 at 4:58pm
post #10673 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post

Interesting.

What are the IEMs lying on btw? biggrin.gif

Looks like fur...

I don't think that titanium is a material suitable for 3D printing.

So maybe the drivers? Not so sure about that either....

3 D printing Was for the housing / casing
I don't thing the driver need 3 D printing
This 3 D printing is to show off how good the looking from FAD LAB 1
Edited by rudi0504 - 3/15/14 at 9:34pm
post #10674 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by eke2k6 View Post

I would have loved to include the AK240, but it's too soon to be requesting loaners redface.gif

I'll likely have a go at the AK240 and Hugo in the future.

Slowly I sell my DAPs or Amps that I seldom use it
I sell my ak 120 and LCD 3 for buying ak 240
My next DAP to sell is : Studio V 3 edition:D
post #10675 of 13545
Wow that was a really long way to basically say the housings are 3d printed :P
post #10676 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post

Interesting.

What are the IEMs lying on btw? biggrin.gif

Looks like fur...


It is fur, and it is part of the packaging to complete it's bling bling luxurious item status. It does look even more stunning in person and I would have fallen for it had it's cable been removable, or if it is terminated in trrs or rsa balanced.
post #10677 of 13545

I can't think of any benefits for 3D printing in the case of an iem, unless you're the first to do it = bragging rights. It seems like more trouble than it's worth imho.

post #10678 of 13545
^the UM 3x was also 3D printed. it was a good FYI to me but really didn't make a difference as i was after its sound smily_headphones1.gif
post #10679 of 13545

post #10680 of 13545
Quote:
Originally Posted by sp3llv3xit View Post
 

Yay, it's another Glacier user. It's such an underrated amp :D

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