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REVIEW: Sennheiser CX 985

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
INTRODUCTION

I’d like to thank Eric Palonen and Sennheiser USA for the review sample, along with Sennheiser’s Rosmadi Mahmood for addressing any questions or comments I had regarding the CX985.

The following review is on the CX985, the replacement for the last generation CX980 and the latest entry in Sennheiser’s long line of consumer-directed in-ear headphones. As always, the sound heard from canalphones and in-ear monitors is highly dependent on fit and/or tip choice, among other factors, so your mileage may vary.

bdaf18e2_CX985-01.jpeg
CX985 packaging

ACCESSORIES AND BUILD QUALITY

The package of the Sennheiser CX985 contains a large assortment of accessories: a full set of ear adapters, including two types of silicone tips and smallish memory foam tips, a curious-looking shirt clip, diaphragm guards (i.e. filters), a cleaning tool, an airline adapter, a small pouch, and a larger carrying case.

9644e228_CX985-02.jpeg
The CX985 includes a wide assortment of accessories. Carrying case not shown.

I know that as a Head-Fier I shouldn’t dwell too much over the design of earphones and headphones, but I can’t help but pay attention to the detail and craftsmanship that went into the design and manufacture of the CX985. The metal used on the earphones gives the CX985 a very classy yet understated look. The earpieces feel substantial, yet not overly heavy. One interesting design choice focuses on the volume controller. Here Sennheiser integrated the Y-split and volume controller into one piece, simplifying the design. The volume control itself is simple and easy to use, reminiscent of the volume controller on the old MX500 but a bit bulkier. Stress reliefs on the CX985 are present but well-concealed, and I really do like the newly redesigned swivel plug that can be converted to a straight plug, 90-degree angle, or anything in-between. Microphonics are present, but are minimized substantially when using the cable cinch, which cleverly separates from the volume controller.

01675c7c_CX985-03.jpeg
A closer view of the CX985

Looking at the actual earpieces, it is notable that the CX985 eschews the usual grill-like filter in favor of diaphragm guards, small pieces of foam that are inserted into the angled nozzles of the earphones. First making an appearance in the 800 series CX earphones as well as this earphone’s predecessor, the CX980, the use of foam diaphragm guards was most likely a response to a few cases where some CX canalphone owners experienced softening, or complete loss of, volume in one or both earpieces as a result of clogged filters. I think it was a good idea for Sennheiser to address this by using user-replaceable filters, and should benefit both the consumer and the company alike. It also opens up some modding potential, though I didn’t really explore that in the time leading up to this review.

While on the topic of modding, let’s take a look at the two different types of silicone tips. These tips are similar in construction to Sony’s Hybrid tips, except the bore of the opening of the tips is quite a bit larger and has a bar across the diameter of the opening that seemingly prevents the diaphragm guard from accidentally falling out (though the foam doesn’t seem to move when inserted fully and properly) and keeps the opening from collapsing when inserted into the ear. Notice in the picture below that the two types of tips sit on the nozzle differently; the bass-enhacing pink-cored tips sit all the way back on the nozzle, while the balanced white-cored tips sit further up.

698db63a_CX985-04.jpeg
Picture illustrating how the two types of silicone tips fit on the CX985's nozzle

This results in two distinct levels of seal: the CX985 with the balanced tips feel like the earphone is just sitting in the ear, while with the bass tips, the earphone creates a very noticeable seal. The latter leads to increased isolation (which I find excellent for a vented dynamic) and increased bass response. The balanced tips provide less isolation, though still decent for a vented dynamic canalphone. For those who may not get the best fit with the included tips, keep in mind that the CX985’s nozzle bore is narrower than that of many previous IE series IEMs and CX series earphones (except for the 800 series, Sennheiser/adidas CX68x, and the CX980), so these tips are not compatible. However, I did find that Sony hybrids work well, as do the HiFiMAN/Grado iGi big bi-flanges (Thanks to jant71 for the tip, no pun intended!), and do alter the sound noticeably.

SOUND

I spent most of my time listening to the CX985 through the balanced, white-cored tips. When I first listened to the earphones with these tips, what struck me first was the clarity of the presentation, with superb transparency and black background. The CX985 is a very airy sounding canalphone, with a tall and deep soundstage that allows instruments to be very well-separated and layered. I do find it lacks just a bit in soundstage width, causing some brass instruments such as trumpets to be placed just outside the right ear, but this rarely presents itself to be an issue at normal listening volumes. As the CX985 is a very dynamic headphone, one must be careful when setting the volume during quiet passages.

The bass of the CX985 when using the balanced tips is very tight with strong impact, despite the fact that quantitatively it is just a bit more than neutral. Texture and extension is quite good, and a slight bump in midbass gives just the right amount of warmth and body to the sound while still maintaining great clarity in the midrange. In these respects the CX985’s bass reminds me of Sennheiser’s entry-level model, the CX280, but the bass here is far quicker, much more dynamic, and doesn’t get in the way of enjoyment like the CX280’s can at times, as it should considering the price difference.

The midrange does remain slightly laid-back and quite airy when compared to neutral-to-slightly-mid-centered IEMs like Etymotic Research’s HF series. Even with its airiness, the Sennheiser never sounds grainy, and the response stays very smooth with the exception of a localized elevation in the upper midrange / lower treble, say around 6 kHz, which can lead to some sibilance and the aforementioned close-sounding brass instruments, as well as slightly higher volume with cymbals. Again, this usually only occurs when listening at higher volume, and I do feel that the CX985 is an excellent performer at lower listening levels. The midrange timbre is otherwise excellent, and string instruments of all kinds reveal the Sennheiser’s great speed and articulation of subtleties.

The treble of the Sennheiser is surprisingly competent. Granted, when I think of great treble response, Sennheiser usually isn’t the first name to come to mind, but I have to say the higher frequencies are well represented in the CX985’s sound signature, especially when using the balanced tips. Highs are very well-extended, detailed, crisp, and yes, sparkly. There is more treble here than in the Etymotic HF3, but there is no hint of splashiness or grain, so the response is pleasant despite the quantity.

Early on, I must confess that I wasn’t the biggest fan of the bass-enhanced, pink-cored tips. Out of the box, I found the CX985s with these tips to sound far too aggressive in the bass and treble, and the overall sound just was not enjoyable. Over time, I found that as the tips started to soften up, I noticed the bass tightened up considerably, and the treble actually turned out to be a bit smoother than the white-cored balanced tips. That said, these are tips are referred to as bass-enhanced for a reason. The lower frequencies of the CX985 are substantially fuller and deeper sounding when compared to leaner-sounding balanced tips. The bass-enhanced tips add darkness to the tone, though some of that darkness is offset by elevated upper mids and treble. I can definitely see the CX985-and-bass-tip combination becoming a favorite among more discerning bassheads as much of the quality of the bass that is revealed by the balanced tips, including the excellent texture and impact, is retained, albeit amplified in volume.

CONCLUSION

When I had a chance to review the CX280, I concluded that we were getting a glimpse of what was to come from Sennheiser: in-ear headphones that retained what many like about their sound, including the large soundstage, foundation-building bass, and natural tonality of the midrange, and supplement that with better resolution, clarity, and less graininess. I was merely hoping that we'd get a higher-end earphone with these traits in the next generation IE series; little did I know that what is essentially a well thought-out refresh of an existing model would give me exactly what I had been looking for. I'm quite pleased with CX985's ability to resolve detail while remaining musical, and in that regard I find it very similar to my favorite earbud, the Creative Aurvana Air. The combination of the great sound, excellent build, and aggressive pricing make the Sennheiser CX985 a great choice for those who are looking for a balanced and/or dark-sounding in-ear headphone that's well-built and looks good, too.
post #2 of 35

Many thanks for this review, kjk1281! We're glad you like the CX 985 wink_face.gif

 

Anyway, I've made a post on the batch error involving the carrying case. We want to make sure that all owners of CX 985 get well taken care of. Here's the link to the original post:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/620028/sennheiser-cx-985-announcement-improvements-plus-a-lower-price-with-a-question/15#post_8808154

post #3 of 35

Excellent review!  Thanks a bunch for taking the time to write it all up!

beerchug.gif

 

Got two quick questions for ya:

 

1.  In the pic with the caption stating "A closer view of the CX985"...  is the bug on the left using the pink bass tip or the white balanced tip? 

 

2.  Have you had any problems with the variable geometry plug in terms of durability?

post #4 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosmadi Mahmood View Post

Many thanks for this review, kjk1281! We're glad you like the CX 985 wink_face.gif

Thanks again for the opportunity! I really do like the CX 985. Hopefully the acoustic improvement and the usability tweaks, combined with the much lower price, will help these get the attention I feel they deserve.

Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post

Excellent review!  Thanks a bunch for taking the time to write it all up!
beerchug.gif

Got two quick questions for ya:

1.  In the pic with the caption stating "A closer view of the CX985"...  is the bug on the left using the pink bass tip or the white balanced tip? 

2.  Have you had any problems with the variable geometry plug in terms of durability?

Thanks! This was probably my longest review yet, even though I still feel like I'm missing something. If I am, people can just come in and ask. tongue.gif

About your questions:

1. The CX 985 as pictured is using the balanced, white-cored tips.

2. I haven't had any issues at all with the plug during the month I've had them. The joint movement is smooth but not loose, and the cable stays in place within the mechanism. I'm not too worried about durability, but we'll see how the plug fares long term as I'm sure there will be plenty of owners with the MOMENTUM, MX 985, and CX 985, and perhaps other future Senns that might use this plug.
post #5 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

Thanks! This was probably my longest review yet, even though I still feel like I'm missing something. If I am, people can just come in and ask. tongue.gif

 

We'll always feel like we're missing something.  It's the nature of the game.  To my knowledge, there's only been one review in the history of Head-Fi that hasn't missed a thing.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

1. The CX 985 as pictured is using the balanced, white-cored tips.

 

Okay, gotcha.  The reason why I ask is because one of the IEMs that I'm reviewing now comes with similar tips (in various sizes).  And I just wanted to know if that kind of tip construction is what causes it to seal so well.  Thanks!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

2. I haven't had any issues at all with the plug during the month I've had them. The joint movement is smooth but not loose, and the cable stays in place within the mechanism. I'm not too worried about durability, but we'll see how the plug fares long term as I'm sure there will be plenty of owners with the MOMENTUM, MX 985, and CX 985, and perhaps other future Senns that might use this plug.

 

Awesome, thanks!  It looks very cool, like the robotic arm.  smile.gif

post #6 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post

We'll always feel like we're missing something.  It's the nature of the game.  To my knowledge, there's only been one review in the history of Head-Fi that hasn't missed a thing.

I've learned long ago that I'm no Darth Nut! But perhaps that could be a good thing. tongue.gif

Quote:
Okay, gotcha.  The reason why I ask is because one of the IEMs that I'm reviewing now comes with similar tips (in various sizes).  And I just wanted to know if that kind of tip construction is what causes it to seal so well.  Thanks!

I'm trying to think of manufacturers that use or are planning on using similar-style tips. Heir Audio? Vsonic? Don't say anything. I want it to be a surprise!

Quote:
Awesome, thanks!  It looks very cool, like the robotic arm.  smile.gif

I'm kind of surprised nobody's tried this before (that I'm aware of). People always seem to complain about whether a plug is right-angled or straight, and this caters to both parties. I feel this is a much better solution than the seemingly half-arsed 45-degree plug that Etymotic likes to use. Obviously more expensive though when properly engineered.
post #7 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

I've learned long ago that I'm no Darth Nut! But perhaps that could be a good thing. tongue.gif

 

Neither am I - which is also a good thing.  Every time someone says that my review is long, I think about his and say to myself "nope, not really."  I try to put in a bunch of pics and track listing and such - so that the end result looks a bit longer than it really is.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

I'm trying to think of manufacturers that use or are planning on using similar-style tips. Heir Audio? Vsonic? Don't say anything. I want it to be a surprise!

 

Oh it will be.  It's not a brand that one would normally think of.  On a side note, I absolutely love those tips (especially vs. standard silicone tips that collapse in the center with a stern look).  But the one drawback of them is that they're devilishly difficult to put on.  Took quite a bit of foreplay for me to get them in the mood.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

I'm kind of surprised nobody's tried this before (that I'm aware of). People always seem to complain about whether a plug is right-angled or straight, and this caters to both parties. I feel this is a much better solution than the seemingly half-arsed 45-degree plug that Etymotic likes to use. Obviously more expensive though when properly engineered.

 

Yeah, but I can see the engineering challenge in doing something like that.  That's why I was asking about the durability earlier.  Making it happen isn't very hard - making it stand up to life for years on end is a bit more tricky.

 

If you had to give the unit an overall score (for it's price range of course), what do you think that it would be?

post #8 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post

Neither am I - which is also a good thing.  Every time someone says that my review is long, I think about his and say to myself "nope, not really."  I try to put in a bunch of pics and track listing and such - so that the end result looks a bit longer than it really is.

Adding a bunch of pics is a great way to a̶r̶t̶i̶f̶i̶c̶a̶l̶l̶y̶ ̶l̶e̶n̶g̶t̶h̶e̶n̶ flesh out a review. Unfortunately, my four year old point-and-shoot just doesn't cut it, particularly when trying to photograph some of the nicer looking wares like the CX 985.

Quote:
Oh it will be.  It's not a brand that one would normally think of.  On a side note, I absolutely love those tips (especially vs. standard silicone tips that collapse in the center with a stern look).  But the one drawback of them is that they're devilishly difficult to put on.  Took quite a bit of foreplay for me to get them in the mood.

I actually thought they were a bit too stiff out of the box! redface.gif

But I do like the seal that the pink-cored tips provide, which leads me to this:

WE INTERRUPT THIS THREAD FOR A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT.

WHEN USING TIPS THAT PROVIDE A GOOD SEAL, DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE THE CX 985 AS MUSIC IS PLAYING. THE CX 985 IS CAPABLE OF MOVING A LOT OF AIR, AND ATTEMPTING TO REMOVE THE EARPHONES MAY CAUSE DISCOMFORT AND/OR INJURY TO THE EAR. TO AVOID THIS, PAUSE MUSIC PLAYBACK ON THE PORTABLE MEDIA PLAYER OR OTHER DEVICE FIRST, THEN REMOVE THE EARPHONES.

WE NOW RETURN TO OUR REGULARLY SCHEDULED HEAD-FI THREAD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post

Yeah, but I can see the engineering challenge in doing something like that.  That's why I was asking about the durability earlier.  Making it happen isn't very hard - making it stand up to life for years on end is a bit more tricky.

If you had to give the unit an overall score (for it's price range of course), what do you think that it would be?

I've always found it difficult to give scores out in my reviews, partially because what I value changes as I gain more experience. I also lack some of the experience with some of the heavyweights in this price range, including the VSonic GR07 MKI / II / Flagship Version / Whatever Version We're on Now and the Brainwavz B2, just to name two. So with that lack of experience in mind, and based on my ownership of the Etymotic HF3, which comes in at a similar MSRP (though a very different sounding headphone with a lower street price), I'd probably rate the CX 985 something between a 9 and a 9.5 out of 10. I think the sound is well worth the price, the build quality is excellent, and the tip-based sound tuning rounds out the package.
.
Edited by kjk1281 - 10/29/12 at 12:21pm
post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

Adding a bunch of pics is a great way to a̶r̶t̶i̶f̶i̶c̶a̶l̶l̶y̶ ̶l̶e̶n̶g̶t̶h̶e̶n̶ flesh out a review. Unfortunately, my four year old point-and-shoot just doesn't cut it, particularly when trying to photograph some of the nicer looking wares like the CX 985.

 

Hey, I'm working with a six year old 5MP point and shoot, so I feel ya there.  I actually have access to a kick-ass photography setup at work with a real lightbox and everything - but that would be misappropriating company resources.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

WHEN USING TIPS THAT PROVIDE A GOOD SEAL, DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE THE CX 985 AS MUSIC IS PLAYING. THE CX 985 IS CAPABLE OF MOVING A LOT OF AIR, AND ATTEMPTING TO REMOVE THE EARPHONES MAY CAUSE DISCOMFORT AND/OR INJURY TO THE EAR. TO AVOID THIS, PAUSE MUSIC PLAYBACK ON THE PORTABLE MEDIA PLAYER OR OTHER DEVICE FIRST, THEN REMOVE THE EARPHONES.

 

LOL, I get that even when nothing is playing.  I often forget about how good the seal is until I attempt to pull them out.  That suction feeling makes me feel like it's taking a little bit of my eardrum with it every time it comes out.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

I've always found it difficult to give scores out in my reviews, partially because what I value changes as I gain more experience.

 

Of course, as do we all.  Didn't mean to put you on the spot btw, just curious.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

I'd probably rate the CX 985 something between a 9 and a 9.5 out of 10. I think the sound is well worth the price, the build quality is excellent, and the tip-based sound tuning rounds out the package.

 

Wow, that good?  Even though I love the ones I'm reviewing now, I might just have to give those a shot then!  smile.gif

post #10 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by warrenpchi View Post

Wow, that good?  Even though I love the ones I'm reviewing now, I might just have to give those a shot then!  smile.gif

The only issue I really have is the sibilance, and I know some people may be more sensitive than others. Interestingly enough, the sibilance seems to be less noticeable to my ears when using the balanced tips as opposed to the bass-enhanced tips (despite having more treble emphasis), though that's probably because I listen at lower volume when using the former.

Anyway, let me know when you're done with the reviews!
post #11 of 35

I still say that a little off the volume control smooths out any sibilance and enough hours may as well. The volume control helps with that and I also have my Sony LOD on the way. I have a FiiO cable LOD but since the CX985 have the VC I decided to get the jack version and use the LO quality without the hassle of amp and interconnect. I would like to go amp-less but finding a good phone that doesn't need one and still brings high quality sound with nearly no flaws is difficult. 

 

That is where the CX985 comes into it's own, IME. My last three phones for example have flaws that require fixing of some sort. Don't get me wrong the CX985 also need the basic right tip and fit fix for them to sound exactly the way I'd like. I do not put it as a flaw but a specific design choice by Senn. Simply, while the rest of the IE series happen to be vented semi-open in some aspect, the 985 are capable of great isolation and are totally sealed. Easy to think this is done to attempt to lower the performance vs. their higher ups and it is a simple matter of getting less seal to get their best, clean, crisp, precise and transparent sound. Even sealing them up less is still a slight bit more iso than a IE7 or IE8 gives. The IE's are designed to prevent you from sealing them up and the negatives that can occur from doing so. The CX985 do but too much thickness occurs slowing them down covering detail and emotion somewhat and hurting their dynamics. A case of an earphone with Ken's term "acoustical brilliance" that sacrifices varying amounts of that brilliance with increasing seal and isolation. This allows the bass tips to make it a nearly basshead phone(a quality one) and people to adjust the signature more based on fit than a GR07 which is fairly stable in signature/sound balance and the IE's which attempt to prevent isolation.

 

So, quickly vs. those last three phones. Just generalities since they have all left me since and mostly from memory. I have my notes but the flaws that I deemed them "deal-breakers" are easy to remember. These are unamped comparisons.

 

CX985 and the Triple.fi 10. My second TF10 which I had purchased on Black Friday last to try cable swapping. To my surprise I got a rare balanced version that had even mids. The issue I have is the artificial bloom on the notes that most older style UE's have that goes away with a cable swap. My golden ears hear but I know some don't and the right amp can nearly kill it but this, again, is unamped. I am well versed having had two 5 Pro's, two TF10's, one 5 EB, and four 3 studio's/Altec 336's. IME, the CX985 gets better isolation, has better build quality, fit, and comfort. Nicer style as well. The notes are cleaner and more precise than the bloom on the TF10. The CX985 mids are cleaner more detailed and emotive. Bass has more sub-bass emphasis than the TF10 which is more toward the mid-bass and the CX as you might expect has more impact/feel. They do share a fairly close signature and fun sound though.

 

CX985 and the GR07(early first run model). The first incarnation of the GR07 was tuned a certain way. Some say less bass/mid-bass than newer versions but I can't say anything about that. I do know that the early GR07 is quite flat and is slightly treble tipped in emphasis and extension unamped. The GR07 is really best amped. The CX985 is the other way with the low end and mids emphasis and less extended but bright treble. The two are on par as far as quality build and design but the GR-7 had some sound issues that the CX985 doesn't when running unamped. The GR07 stage is really wide not nearly as tall and even less depth-wise. The CX985 is less oval and more circular in stage. Height, width, and depth are just more even and the GR07 differences stick out and hurt the transparency in terms of forgetting they are there. The CX985 mids are less dry and more detailed and emotive. The CX985 can have more precise notes and the unamped dynamics are superior until you seal them up more. But if you want the CX with bass tips then you don't want the GR07 either. The CX985 can layer out and separate better than the GR07 in the bass and mids. The Gr07 does as good in that respect only towards the treble without the extra juice.

 

CX985 and the ASG-1 1.0. Flat out the CX is easier to fit and has totally different aesthetics. The CX985 in bass mode can be a lot like the ASG-1 1.0  with less forward mids and sparklier treble. The way I wore both, with less seal to attain better balance, the CX985 has sharper, quicker notes, more clarity and transparency, cleaner mids, and decent bit of treble the ASG-1 1.0 just holds back on. They present/image quite similarly and more 3-D but the Senn has superior separation abilities.

 

 

 

Overall, I do find the CX985 one of my top favorites. The way I run it with a bit less seal than max it is more along the lines of a better RE0 or an NRB-modded CK10. Or maybe a mix between the two. Really quick sharp notes and wonderful transparency and some of the best separation I have heard. Unamped you get the dynamic driver bass you really lack from a CK10 or RE0 but still quick and tight. A bit bigger than the RE0 in height and depth but not as airy as the CK10. If you go for the bass tips you'll get something like a sparklier, meatier. and more fun IE7.

 

Quite versatile as you can use tips to change the sound as well as the volume control to add some resistance. The filters, or diaphragm guards as well. You get two extra pairs and can experiment. Hard to say just how it sounds other than well balanced and how thick or thin is up to you. Treble will always be there so they are probably not for those who want dark or laid back. A bit different from the old Sennheiser sound in that regard as far as a veil or smooth blanket covering things.


Edited by jant71 - 10/31/12 at 12:24pm
post #12 of 35
Thread Starter 
Excellent post and agreed on all points! Also adds some comparisons that I thought were lacking in my review.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jant71 View Post

CX985 and the Triple.fi 10. My second TF10 which I had purchased on Black Friday last to try cable swapping. To my surprise I got a rare balanced version that had even mids. The issue I have is the artificial bloom on the notes that most older style UE's have that goes away with a cable swap. My golden ears hear but I know some don't and the right amp can nearly kill it but this, again, is unamped. I am well versed having had two 5 Pro's, two TF10's, one 5 EB, and four 3 studio's/Altec 336's. IME, the CX985 gets better isolation, has better build quality, fit, and comfort. Nicer style as well. The notes are cleaner and more precise than the bloom on the TF10. The CX985 mids are cleaner more detailed and emotive. Bass has more sub-bass emphasis than the TF10 which is more toward the mid-bass and the CX as you might expect has more impact/feel. They do share a fairly close signature and fun sound though.

I was almost going to do a comparison with the Triple.fi but I wasn't sure if my ears were deceiving me. This pretty much sums up what I hear when comparing the two earphones.

Quote:
Quite versatile as you can use tips to change the sound as well as the volume control to add some resistance. The filters, or diaphragm guards as wee. You get two extra pairs and can experiment. Hard to say just how it sounds other than well balanced and how thick or thin is up to you. Treble will always be there so they are probably not for those who want dark or laid back. A bit different from the old Sennheiser sound in that regard as far as a veil or smooth blanket covering things.

The versatility is what really puts the CX985 over the top in my opinion. I can switch between the two included tips depending on mood or the music I'm listening to, and if I want something a little different, I can try some other tips that I have on stock. This is easily one of my favorite earphones.
post #13 of 35

Brilliant review, jant71! Thanks! wink_face.gif

post #14 of 35

Posted my review here: http://www.head-fi.org/products/sennheiser-cx-985/reviews/7796

 

The Headfonics one with pretty pictures should be up by tomorrow. I like these.

post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjk1281 View Post

I've always found it difficult to give scores out in my reviews, partially because what I value changes as I gain more experience. I also lack some of the experience with some of the heavyweights in this price range, including the VSonic GR07 MKI / II / Flagship Version / Whatever Version We're on Now and the Brainwavz B2, just to name two. So with that lack of experience in mind, and based on my ownership of the Etymotic HF3, which comes in at a similar MSRP (though a very different sounding headphone with a lower street price), I'd probably rate the CX 985 something between a 9 and a 9.5 out of 10. I think the sound is well worth the price, the build quality is excellent, and the tip-based sound tuning rounds out the package.
.

 

Nice review! And Im glad you dont give out scores.. I think its ridiculous that some reviewers can review so many IEMs and think there is value in giving scores

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