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Hifiman IEM's: RE-400 and RE-600 - Page 148

post #2206 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by maguire View Post
 

How do you guys find the newer cable on the RE 400?

I am just waiting on my replacement pair with that newer version to arrive.

 

ya it really better when they remove that useless kevlar ....

post #2207 of 2264

Do you have any pics? Mine just arrived & look identical to the pair I sent away.

post #2208 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by maguire View Post
 

Do you have any pics? Mine just arrived & look identical to the pair I sent away.

 

I saw Re400b with new cable. They dun use kevlar and make a thicker cable i wish i can recable my Re600

post #2209 of 2264

I just got a pair of RE-400s after 6 years with my trusty Sennheiser cx-500s. I've owned a low end pair of Shures (broke) and even some Monoprice 8320 (just don't fit me) but I always came back to the cx-500s.

 

After getting my RE--400s I must say I am disappointed. All the reviews were great but maybe I am doing something wrong?

 

So far they have had 10 hours of pink noise burn-in. I spent a long time trying all the tips but ended up using the silicone tips from the sennheisers. I don't find the RE-400s nearly as comfortable and they move around a lot in my ear and I am constantly adjusting them.

 

Some tracks sound great and others terrible. I listen mostly to electronica, drum'n'bass and techno and sometimes the bass is good and other times it seems to be totally lacking. They don't seem to have much sound-stage and I find them harder to drive than the cx-500s.

 

Does anyone have any advice? Do they need more burn-in time? Should I try different tips again?

post #2210 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by marctwo View Post

I just got a pair of RE-400s after 6 years with my trusty Sennheiser cx-500s. I've owned a low end pair of Shures (broke) and even some Monoprice 8320 (just don't fit me) but I always came back to the cx-500s.

After getting my RE--400s I must say I am disappointed. All the reviews were great but maybe I am doing something wrong?

So far they have had 10 hours of pink noise burn-in. I spent a long time trying all the tips but ended up using the silicone tips from the sennheisers. I don't find the RE-400s nearly as comfortable and they move around a lot in my ear and I am constantly adjusting them.

Some tracks sound great and others terrible. I listen mostly to electronica, drum'n'bass and techno and sometimes the bass is good and other times it seems to be totally lacking. They don't seem to have much sound-stage and I find them harder to drive than the cx-500s.

Does anyone have any advice? Do they need more burn-in time? Should I try different tips again?

The RE-400 would not be my first suggestion for electronic music.
post #2211 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post


The RE-400 would not be my first suggestion for electronic music.

 

I hoped the neutrality would make them a decent choice for a wide range of music.

post #2212 of 2264

I felt the same way! They do music justice, it's just your crappy audio source! After I fed it through my fiio e18 kunlun it turned into a completely different beast!

post #2213 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadiatedAnt View Post
 

I felt the same way! They do music justice, it's just your crappy audio source! After I fed it through my fiio e18 kunlun it turned into a completely different beast!

+1 .. With Nexus 5 and Spotify 320 kbps they sounded good, but now with ipod 5.5g + C5D and apple lossless they sound phenomenal..

post #2214 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by ankurjhunjhunwala View Post
 

+1 .. With Nexus 5 and Spotify 320 kbps they sounded good, but now with ipod 5.5g + C5D and apple lossless they sound phenomenal..

 

Oddly, I actually felt they sounded better with Spotify than Apple Lossless through my iPhone.

post #2215 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by marctwo View Post
 

I just got a pair of RE-400s after 6 years with my trusty Sennheiser cx-500s. I've owned a low end pair of Shures (broke) and even some Monoprice 8320 (just don't fit me) but I always came back to the cx-500s.

 

After getting my RE--400s I must say I am disappointed. All the reviews were great but maybe I am doing something wrong?

 

So far they have had 10 hours of pink noise burn-in. I spent a long time trying all the tips but ended up using the silicone tips from the sennheisers. I don't find the RE-400s nearly as comfortable and they move around a lot in my ear and I am constantly adjusting them.

 

Some tracks sound great and others terrible. I listen mostly to electronica, drum'n'bass and techno and sometimes the bass is good and other times it seems to be totally lacking. They don't seem to have much sound-stage and I find them harder to drive than the cx-500s.

 

Does anyone have any advice? Do they need more burn-in time? Should I try different tips again?

Well, a good seal for one is critical for bass response, thus it's important to get tips that fit and seal well...a deeper insertion yields better results too.  Beyond that, I agree with tinyman in that these are definitely more neutral than anything, with more forward mids (which tends to give a more relaxed presentation in contrast to a V-shaped or Warm signature with more bass and treble emphasis).  You may want to try foam tips, but these will never be really bass heavy.  Possibly with some modding...but even then I still would call it just slightly warmer.  For my tastes, they're good for most electronic music but they will present bass as it is in the recording more often that not, and never over-exaggerate it or add in extra warmth.  They're also not a particularly warm headphone in general, but I would say the soundstage is above average in size (perceptively less so because of the forward mids).  They are higher impedance than the CX500 (50Ohm vs 16Ohm) so they'll be a bit harder to drive from some devices...though even the lower power Clip+ drives the RE-400 to pretty loud volumes easily from my experience.

 

Physical burn-in isn't going to do much, 'brain burn-in' however where you're getting adjusted to a new signature is most likely going to make a bigger change.  Give them some exclusive time, then go back to your CX500 after a week.  Also try different tips with a more narrow bore hole (like Sony Hybrids) if the stock tips aren't fitting well...and if you're handy, you can perform some simple damping mods to bring the FR below 1kHz more forward (highlighted in the comparison link below).  Due to your musical tastes and the fact that you find them lacking in bass in some cases though, I would recommend checking out some other IEMs.  This guide is pretty helpful in putting different signatures into perspective and links to full reviews: http://theheadphonelist.com/earphone-buyers-guide/ I would suggest looking at the Warm and Smooth and V-Shaped categories and researching from there.  I did a little comparison of the RE-400 to the EPH-100 and I would say the latter definitely sounds like it'd be more suited to your tastes (or that type of signature rather).

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/704091/hifiman-re-400-or-yamaha-eph-100

 

I personally would recommend checking out the SteelSeries Flux for ~$50 or the Yamaha EPH-100 for $100+ for electronic genres depending on budget, and if possible compare them directly to the RE-400.

post #2216 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by modulor View Post
 

Well, a good seal for one is critical for bass response, thus it's important to get tips that fit and seal well...a deeper insertion yields better results too.  Beyond that, I agree with tinyman in that these are definitely more neutral than anything, with more forward mids (which tends to give a more relaxed presentation in contrast to a V-shaped or Warm signature with more bass and treble emphasis).  You may want to try foam tips, but these will never be really bass heavy.  Possibly with some modding...but even then I still would call it just slightly warmer.  For my tastes, they're good for most electronic music but they will present bass as it is in the recording more often that not, and never over-exaggerate it or add in extra warmth.  They're also not a particularly warm headphone in general, but I would say the soundstage is above average in size (perceptively less so because of the forward mids).  They are higher impedance than the CX500 (50Ohm vs 16Ohm) so they'll be a bit harder to drive from some devices...though even the lower power Clip+ drives the RE-400 to pretty loud volumes easily from my experience.

 

Physical burn-in isn't going to do much, 'brain burn-in' however where you're getting adjusted to a new signature is most likely going to make a bigger change.  Give them some exclusive time, then go back to your CX500 after a week.  Also try different tips with a more narrow bore hole (like Sony Hybrids) if the stock tips aren't fitting well...and if you're handy, you can perform some simple damping mods to bring the FR below 1kHz more forward (highlighted in the comparison link below).  Due to your musical tastes and the fact that you find them lacking in bass in some cases though, I would recommend checking out some other IEMs.  This guide is pretty helpful in putting different signatures into perspective and links to full reviews: http://theheadphonelist.com/earphone-buyers-guide/ I would suggest looking at the Warm and Smooth and V-Shaped categories and researching from there.  I did a little comparison of the RE-400 to the EPH-100 and I would say the latter definitely sounds like it'd be more suited to your tastes (or that type of signature rather).

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/704091/hifiman-re-400-or-yamaha-eph-100

 

I personally would recommend checking out the SteelSeries Flux for ~$50 or the Yamaha EPH-100 for $100+ for electronic genres depending on budget, and if possible compare them directly to the RE-400.

 

Thank you, some very good suggestions there.

 

I wear them the same way as the CX500s, very shallow using the medium tips. If I insert then any deeper I find pressure in my ear and they sound terrible. Maybe this is where I am going wrong?

 

The bass does sound ok with some tracks and not so much with others. I'll keep trying different things and see if I can improve the situation.

 

I did look at the Yamahas and the RHAs but was put off by the V shaped response, I really did want something more accurate. Maybe I was wrong.

post #2217 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by marctwo View Post

Thank you, some very good suggestions there.

I wear them the same way as the CX500s, very shallow using the medium tips. If I insert then any deeper I find pressure in my ear and they sound terrible. Maybe this is where I am going wrong?

The bass does sound ok with some tracks and not so much with others. I'll keep trying different things and see if I can improve the situation.

I did look at the Yamahas and the RHAs but was put off by the V shaped response, I really did want something more accurate. Maybe I was wrong.

The re400s are actually meant for deep insertion, thats why they made the body so small as well. But again as stated earlier, the re400s wouldnt be my first recommendation electronic music. I actually find the re400 very forgiving of the source, it never gets harsh or anything (the treble extends tremendously).

But again if you want more bass try narrower tips like the sony hybrids, i even went as far as to mash my oval klipsch tips (very narrow opening) you could try ur shure tips. But deep insertion is a must for the re400, their a bit bass light as it is.

I actually use smaller tips if i want more bass for it to get in deeper, but i heard others say differently.
post #2218 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom22 View Post


The re400s are actually meant for deep insertion, thats why they made the body so small as well. But again as stated earlier, the re400s wouldnt be my first recommendation electronic music. I actually find the re400 very forgiving of the source, it never gets harsh or anything (the treble extends tremendously).

But again if you want more bass try narrower tips like the sony hybrids, i even went as far as to mash my oval klipsch tips (very narrow opening) you could try ur shure tips. But deep insertion is a must for the re400, their a bit bass light as it is.

I actually use smaller tips if i want more bass for it to get in deeper, but i heard others say differently.

 

I tried the smaller tips and putting them deeper but couldn't get a good seal. I'll keep experimenting, thank you.

post #2219 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by marctwo View Post

I tried the smaller tips and putting them deeper but couldn't get a good seal. I'll keep experimenting, thank you.

Yea keep trying! When i take out my re400sci use the gr07 larger black tips, theres a suction effect. The sony hybrids could be a good idea the silcone the use is very "suctiony" if they makes sense. , since u already bought it might as well experiment rather than get something else so soon. Good luck!
post #2220 of 2264
Quote:
Originally Posted by marctwo View Post
 

 

Thank you, some very good suggestions there.

 

I wear them the same way as the CX500s, very shallow using the medium tips. If I insert then any deeper I find pressure in my ear and they sound terrible. Maybe this is where I am going wrong?

 

The bass does sound ok with some tracks and not so much with others. I'll keep trying different things and see if I can improve the situation.

 

I did look at the Yamahas and the RHAs but was put off by the V shaped response, I really did want something more accurate. Maybe I was wrong.

If you're using medium size tips, try the small double-flange tips that come with the RE-400 (I think they come pre-installed) as those have the most narrow bore.  Those are kind of designed for a relatively shallow fit, but even if they're not the most comfortable, see if that makes a positive difference sound-wise to you...it should elevate the bass a bit due to the narrower opening.  I will say tip rolling will only take you so far, but it's worth an investigation.  Sony Hybrids are good to try too.

 

There are pretty neutral options out there that have bigger bass body, more lushness and more slam (relatively speaking) or I guess you can say different degres of neutral.  For example, I own the Flux and it's not quite as refined as the RE-400 but it's definitely a more engaging, warmer listen and a more ideal choice for electronic in some cases (or for some preferences).  The EPH-100 is actually pretty neutral, just with a bass boost in the lower registers...I never felt they were truly v-shaped, rather the bass/mids are relatively balanced with one another and the treble is smooth behind them (hence warm/smooth category in joker's writeup) so more of a natural downward slope.  Some will find this a more natural presentation overall and more accurate, and I can definitely agree with that...it can paint a more realistic image in some genres.  I personally have the RE-400 now primarily for vocals and acoustic tracks...it's a great all-arounder but on the more relaxed, less engaging side of that and is best suited for those types of music IMO, while not entirely lacking in others...it's all about the mids.

 

The measurement can be deceptive though comparing directly to those of the RE-400, but I can say there is audibly less sub-bass reverberance in the RE-400 even though it goes down low (similar to how some single/dual BA IEMs sound).  The bass is pretty big and fun on the EPH-100 but without drowning out any other frequencies, as well presented forward bass should be (you don't want muddiness of course) and you can feel the bass (adds a sense of sub-bass realism).  The RHAs are similar, with more of a downward slope so that they're warm with more forward sub-bass but also has a smooth signature overall.  Joker's writeup on the MA750 has some comparison to the RE-400 so you can see where each pair's merits lie...I'd say that they're on par from a technical standpoint, with different presentations: http://theheadphonelist.com/headphone_review/rha-ma750-ma750i/ Same can be said from my (and his) assessment of the EPH-100...these are still not true 'basshead' levels of bass, but you get a better sense of proper bass presentation, at the cost of changing the FR slightly.  This is one reason I encourage people to try out different things, because at least in my journey it's taken a few tries to find out what balance is best suited for me...and my favorite IEM to date is the BA200 :p but the RE-400 still has it's place in my collection.


Edited by modulor - 5/9/14 at 12:00pm
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