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AES 2012 paper: "Relationship between Perception and Measurement of Headphone Sound Quality" - Page 7

post #91 of 130

My favourite sound signature is neutral with good extension in the bass and highs (i.e. HE-500). I always used to hate neutral sound because it was boring, but as soon as I bought my first pair of Paradigm speakers I began to think otherwise. The only reason I thought neutral sound was boring before was lack of extension and detail. Sometimes I prefer I slight emphasis in the bass, but who doesn't wink_face.gif.

post #92 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronion View Post

Anyone who has read Dr. olive's paper care to comment? Seems a cat's got his tongue. :/


from my understanding the FR would be something pretty much flat going slowly down as freqs goes higher. and most important thing is to have a smooth graph without any violent changes. so i would take your results and kind of normalize them to flatten your FR a bit.

post #93 of 130
Those were taken in ear and in the sweet spot of a calibrated stereo. PSB has done a similar method/target to Harman Kardon and got a curve similar to the ones in the link when measured on a dummy head--at least on Inner Fidelity. The ones in the link seem to look more free-field in the treble where PSB's measured response looks more diffuse field. We don't know what their target response is. The bass is elevated on both. Inner Fidelity says Harman did some additional angles for their target response. It would be interesting to learn why and what they actually came up with. Intuitively it would seem that straight ahead in the sweet spot would be ideal. I'm assuming they tried that and it didn't work but who knows...
post #94 of 130

sure for the measurements, but the first study showed that fast dips or boosts didn't please the subjects. that's why i suggested smoothing your result.

 

as you're your own test subject i guess it will not be too hard to try both options and let the subject decide. ^_^

post #95 of 130
I thought the first paper's results were essentially debunked by the later papers...
post #96 of 130

Having glanced through the slides and the blog post, I wonder whether the channel balance of the headphones was considered in tandem with the type of music played, and further, whether listeners might have a preference for a perfect channel balance or one where certain frequencies are emphasized on one but not the other channel? This I wonder after having looked over the short piece Why do mothers cradle babies on their left? by Sieratzki and Woll, where they suggest via reference that the left ear is more adept at recognizing melody while the right grammar.

post #97 of 130
But what would that have to do with stereo? Stereo is mixed by people listening to 2 identical speakers. Any desired channel differences should be built into the recording, not into the speakers.
post #98 of 130

Have you thus an answer to my question?

post #99 of 130
Me? If so, what exactly is your question?
post #100 of 130

Since I suspect Ronion has a beef rather than an answer, was my question unclear to others?

post #101 of 130
No beef, I just don't understand what you are asking. 'Should the left and right speaker have a different response?' I thought I answered that--or at least gave my opinion. No stereo I know of has 2 different responses for each channel--at least on purpose. They are all a little different. Just not intentionally so.
post #102 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post

Having glanced through the slides and the blog post, I wonder whether the channel balance of the headphones was considered in tandem with the type of music played, and further, whether listeners might have a preference for a perfect channel balance or one where certain frequencies are emphasized on one but not the other channel? This I wonder after having looked over the short piece Why do mothers cradle babies on their left? by Sieratzki and Woll, where they suggest via reference that the left ear is more adept at recognizing melody while the right grammar.


In any case, the point of hardware is to reproduce the sound that is encoded in the audio signal. The differences in the left/right channels---if they are intended to be there---should be encoded in the audio signal. I think Ronion has answered your question.

 

Cheers!

post #103 of 130

I guess he's more talking about situations where for example the cymbals are panned to the left side in the mix and a less pronounced treble response in the left headphone channel would make it less annoying.

 

But yeah, left/right should be identical. For annoying stereo separation and fatigue there is crossfeed or more advanced HRTF processing.

post #104 of 130

I'm mainly referring to the vocal range, which is also what the article by Sieratzki and Woll was concerned about.

 

To say that Ronion has answered the question to me seems the same as to say that the question in the titular paper of this thread had been settled prior and that the paper was thus of no value (though maybe these sentiments have been expressed, I didn't comb the thread). Now, if it's the case that humans don't perceive the vocal range in music the same with both ears, one first wonders whether music is already mixed to take this into account. If not, and even if yes, one might wonder whether, just as there are e.g. bass-heavy headphones to make the sound more interesting for some listeners, there might be headphones whose channel balance was off intentionally in the vocal region depending on what sort of music or listener the phones were meant for. One then wonders whether this is a thing that has had any thought put into it, for which I didn't find an answer in Ronion's posts.

 

Plus, if it's the case that the two ears aren't equal, and since none of the headphones in the paper seemed in good balance between left and right channels, one wonders how much of an effect this had on the results, which Ronion didn't touch on.

post #105 of 130
In the blog link if you search forward a few posts there are measurements showing that the right and left ear have a different acoustic performance from each other. If the headphones are coupled to an ear, you'd expect the resulting measurements to be different.

One would think if there was a bad mismatch from the sources(L&R speakers), it would effect the outcome in preference, stereo field/envelopment, etc...

It would seem like a very bad idea to intentionally mismatch the speakers as no one does it and all recordings are listened to before they are sold.
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