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Audio Technica updates their open headphones "AD" Series: AD2000x, AD1000x, AD900x, AD700x and... - Page 126

post #1876 of 1882
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHeadPhoneGuy View Post
 


Thank you for the quick reply! Are there any digital surround software's that are better than others? I don't really understand what all I need to get the best positional audio.

 

Stock ad700 are REALLY good for positional audio. They really don't need a great audio source or amp to shine. They lack bass and excitement but if positional audio is most important then ad700 is your headphone. 

post #1877 of 1882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folex View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHeadPhoneGuy View Post
 


Thank you for the quick reply! Are there any digital surround software's that are better than others? I don't really understand what all I need to get the best positional audio.

 

Stock ad700 are REALLY good for positional audio. They really don't need a great audio source or amp to shine. They lack bass and excitement but if positional audio is most important then ad700 is your headphone. 

I have the AD700x's already. Im just trying to find software and hardware the provides virtual surround sound. Is having virtual surround even nessassary?

post #1878 of 1882
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHeadPhoneGuy View Post

I have the AD700x's already. Im just trying to find software and hardware the provides virtual surround sound. Is having virtual surround even nessassary?

The best free one would be the Razer digital surround sound software. Get it only if your DAC doesn't have dobly surround support.
post #1879 of 1882
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacobLee89 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHeadPhoneGuy View Post

I have the AD700x's already. Im just trying to find software and hardware the provides virtual surround sound. Is having virtual surround even nessassary?

The best free one would be the Razer digital surround sound software. Get it only if your DAC doesn't have dobly surround support.

DAC?

post #1880 of 1882
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHeadPhoneGuy View Post
 

DAC?

Digital to Audio Converter: a sound card basically.

 

For most of us we say DAC because most of our "sound cards" are not inside our computers, and some don't even use USB. As long as the devices converts digital information into sound, it is a DAC.

 

Sound cards however, are not just DACs since they have their own built in amp to power whatever you plug in. A dedicated DAC such as the ODAC or the ELE D01 would not provide enough power for the headphones to reach their potential. This is where an amp comes in.

 

The reason why we tend to lean towards external DACs, than ones inside computers are design orientated: the power regulators in a PC is clean for the electronics being put inside, but is not clean enough to create a noiseless background for any speakers attached to it. Whereas an external DAC, whether it is USB or Optical, can have dedicated power regulators to clean up the "buzzing" sound. The next section of this hobby also revolves around amps and how their design impacts the sound. But that's another thread in itself.

 

But as far as I can tell. The ADX700 shouldn't be too picky whether it's plugged into a sound card, directly into a DAC, or a desktop sound system. Just avoid onboard sound like the plague.

post #1881 of 1882

Using onboard sound discretely is only feasible if your motherboard has a non-standard chip like Creative SoundCore and Asus SupremeFX. If using something like Realtek, then an external dac+amp would be something worth considering.

 

As far as the buzzing sound goes, it's typically a non-issue unless the audio cable that plugs into the header isn't insulated, and that's mostly seen in cheap computers. The outputs on the rear panel are typically void of computer noise.

 

Personally, I don't like virtual audio unless I'm playing a game or watching a movie. With music, it tends to screw up the positioning on some parts, and on some songs, the bass gets some pretty bad reverb, thus messing up the quality of the song. The virtual audio in question is Dolby Headphone, THX TruStudio, and Razer Surround. The latter two basically sound like a crystalizer or treble boost DSP of sorts is turned on.

 

My advice to you would be to watch the following videos, find the virtual sound you like the most, and buy the appropriate card.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04yEtZJVpyY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BxO9cd-sYA

 

Edit:

 

A dac converts your digital music into a analog waveform. There is no amplification involved, so if you were to plug in your headhphones directly into a dac, the sound would be pretty quiet. Calling a soundcard a dac is only half of the story, as most decent sound cards also have integrated amps for the headphone-out jack. Audio-Technica's AD series headphones are pretty easy to drive, so said (op) amps is enough for them to be driven sufficiently.


Edited by Trae - 11/19/14 at 8:35am
post #1882 of 1882
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacobLee89 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHeadPhoneGuy View Post
 

DAC?

Digital to Audio Converter: a sound card basically.

 

For most of us we say DAC because most of our "sound cards" are not inside our computers, and some don't even use USB. As long as the devices converts digital information into sound, it is a DAC.

 

Sound cards however, are not just DACs since they have their own built in amp to power whatever you plug in. A dedicated DAC such as the ODAC or the ELE D01 would not provide enough power for the headphones to reach their potential. This is where an amp comes in.

 

The reason why we tend to lean towards external DACs, than ones inside computers are design orientated: the power regulators in a PC is clean for the electronics being put inside, but is not clean enough to create a noiseless background for any speakers attached to it. Whereas an external DAC, whether it is USB or Optical, can have dedicated power regulators to clean up the "buzzing" sound. The next section of this hobby also revolves around amps and how their design impacts the sound. But that's another thread in itself.

 

But as far as I can tell. The ADX700 shouldn't be too picky whether it's plugged into a sound card, directly into a DAC, or a desktop sound system. Just avoid onboard sound like the plague.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trae View Post
 

Using onboard sound discretely is only feasible if your motherboard has a non-standard chip like Creative SoundCore and Asus SupremeFX. If using something like Realtek, then an external dac+amp would be something worth considering.

 

As far as the buzzing sound goes, it's typically a non-issue unless the audio cable that plugs into the header isn't insulated, and that's mostly seen in cheap computers. The outputs on the rear panel are typically void of computer noise.

 

Personally, I don't like virtual audio unless I'm playing a game or watching a movie. With music, it tends to screw up the positioning on some parts, and on some songs, the bass gets some pretty bad reverb, thus messing up the quality of the song. The virtual audio in question is Dolby Headphone, THX TruStudio, and Razer Surround. The latter two basically sound like a crystalizer or treble boost DSP of sorts is turned on.

 

My advice to you would be to watch the following videos, find the virtual sound you like the most, and buy the appropriate card.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04yEtZJVpyY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BxO9cd-sYA

 

Edit:

 

A dac converts your digital music into a analog waveform. There is no amplification involved, so if you were to plug in your headhphones directly into a dac, the sound would be pretty quiet. Calling a soundcard a dac is only half of the story, as most decent sound cards also have integrated amps for the headphone-out jack. Audio-Technica's AD series headphones are pretty easy to drive, so said (op) amps is enough for them to be driven sufficiently.


OMG thank you guys so much! I finally understand the differences! HeadFi need to a  REP+ or REP- button because yall need a couple +reps.

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