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post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneelJung View Post

 

You mean like Back in Black. I was 16 when that record came out. The Clash released London Calling in 1980 too. Those two records were pretty popular as I recall, one might even say they are iconic at this point. I never saw AC/ DC but I saw the Clash in 1982. Something a little more obscure perhaps from that year was Pete Townsend's solo album, Empty Glass.

 

I would certainly agree on "London Calling" and would have placed it on my list, but since it was official released in Dec. 1979 in the UK/Europe I counted it out. Although it was released in the US in Jan. 1980.

post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jupiterknight View Post

 

I would certainly agree on "London Calling" and would have placed it on my list, but since it was official released in Dec. 1979 in the UK/Europe I counted it out. Although it was released in the US in Jan. 1980.

+1

Yeah it would have been my choice but knew it was 79. I bought it in 80, first album I ever bought! Still got it. Classic.

post #18 of 29
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jupiterknight View Post

 

I would certainly agree on "London Calling" and would have placed it on my list, but since it was official released in Dec. 1979 in the UK/Europe I counted it out. Although it was released in the US in Jan. 1980.

There you have it. Back in the day (1980) my rig was a Pioneer receiver, a Technics turntable, and a pair of Pioneer speakers. I used to go to the record store / slash head shop (the Quonset Hut) once a week, and buy at least one record. I dont have an encyclopedic memory so I googled best albums of 1980, and saw London Calling on the list. It was one of those records I bought on my weekly pilgrimage to the Quonset Hut, and since no one in the US could go to their local vinyl shop and pick up a copy until 1980, I think it qualifies...just sayin biggrin.gif

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneelJung View Post

There you have it. Back in the day (1980) my rig was a Pioneer receiver, a Technics turntable, and a pair of Pioneer speakers. I used to go to the record store / slash head shop (the Quonset Hut) once a week, and buy at least one record. I dont have an encyclopedic memory so I googled best albums of 1980, and saw London Calling on the list. It was one of those records I bought on my weekly pilgrimage to the Quonset Hut, and since no one in the US could go to their local vinyl shop and pick up a copy until 1980, I think it qualifies...just sayin biggrin.gif

 

I just recall that there was minor controversy later on concerning if London Calling should be considered an 70's or 80's album. As I recall Rolling Stones Magazine recognized it as the best Rock album of 1980 and later on as one of the best of the whole decade. Contrary, there was a British rock magazine, I think it must have been NME, that ranked it as one of the best best rock albums of the 70's. Weird stuff so many years later. I actually still have my original vinyl purchased in 1980 wink_face.gif I also remember very well how the cover, and it still does, blew me away.

 

Anyway, London Calling, surely kicked of the 80's in a great way and was one of the 70/80's rock albums that helped transform rock music into a different direction that we still benefit from today and I'll take it any day as the rock best album of 1980 as well :-)

Just my few cents beerchug.gif

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRNQ4EKyqnBFITzNUm4C852w1U8pLxaF4Of4vP5P-ErU_BnmmCQ


Edited by Jupiterknight - 10/31/12 at 7:06pm
post #21 of 29

Judas Priest - Painkiller

post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 

Nope, London Calling doesn't count! rolleyes.gif

 

It was out in '79, even if only in the UK / Europe. All the cool kids in the U.S. who were already following the Clash were buying imports at the record shops back then. There's no way to ease it into 1980 when it was out in 1979!

 

By the way, I saw The Clash on 3/6/1980 at the Tower Theater in Upper Darby, PA when they were touring for London Calling. biggrin.gif

post #23 of 29

1000

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ar1hur View Post

Judas Priest - Painkiller


"Painkiller" was 1990.  Perhaps you're thinking of "British Steel"?

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by StratocasterMan View Post

Nope, London Calling doesn't count! rolleyes.gif

 

Rolling Stone: 100 Best Albums of the Eighties

 

#1

 

 

This album could not have come at a more perfect time or from a more appropriate band than the Clash. Released stateside in January 1980, with the decade but a pup and the new year in gear, London Calling was an emergency broadcast from rock's Last Angry Band, serving notice that Armageddon was nigh, Western society was rotten at the core, and rock & roll needed a good boot in the rear. Kicking and screaming across a nineteen-song double album, skidding between ska, reggae, R&B, third-world music, power pop and full-tilt punk, the Clash stormed the gates of rock convention and single-handedly set the agenda — musically, politically and emotionally — for the decade to come.

The band had already chalked up two masterpieces of petulant punk fury with The Clash (its 1977 debut) and Give 'Em Enough Rope. But this time singer-guitarist-songwriters Joe Strummer and Mick Jones fine-tuned the Clash worldview with a deeper sensitivity, addressing issues by zooming in on individuals and hard realities. While the LP's cosmopolitan sound anticipated the world-music fad, its message — revolution begins at home — triggered the reemergence of pop's social consciousness in the Eighties.

For Strummer, Jones, bassist Paul Simonon and drummer Nicky "Topper" Headon, home was London, where they rehearsed and recorded the bulk of the LP during the late spring and summer of 1979 and where there was ample evidence of impending apocalypse (racial tension, rising unemployment, rampant drug addiction). Strummer's catalog of disasters in the title track, scored with Jones's guitar firepower, sets the tone for the record. But that fear and urgency was also very real to the band, which had just split with manager Bernie Rhodes, was heavily in debt and had declared open warfare on the music business.

"I remember that things were so up in the air, and there was quite a good feeling of us against the world," says Strummer. "We felt that we were struggling, about to slide down a slope or something, grasping with our fingernails. And that there was nobody to help us."

Isolation and desperation are recurring themes on London Calling. The Phil Spector-like glow of "The Card Cheat" belies its lyric pathos, while "Hateful" looks at drug addiction from an addict's point of view ("I'm so grateful to be nowhere"). "There was a sense that life really is a succession of heavy blows," says Jones, "that this is what we have to take day to day." Indeed, "Lost in the Supermarket," a dark slice of peppy Euro-pop, is based on Jones's personal life at the time. "I was living in a council flat with my grandmother," he says. "I couldn't get settled. I was supposed to be this rock star, but I was living with my grandmother," Jones and Strummer wrote a lot of songs in his grandmother's flat before Jones eventually moved out.

The album also has fighting spirit to spare in the likes of "Clampdown" ("Let fury have the hour, anger can be power") and "The Guns of Brixton," a Paul Simonon song that combines images of the racially tense Brixton area of London with the outlaw ethic of The Harder They Come. "Spanish Bombs," initially inspired by a radio news report of a terrorist bombing in the Mediterranean, evokes the rebellious spirit of the Spanish Civil War.

London Calling became a double album simply because of the energetic rate at which Strummer and Jones were writing songs. "Joe, once he learned how to type, would bang the lyrics out at a high rate of good stuff," says Jones. "Then I'd be able to bang out some music while he was hitting the typewriter." The members of the Clash devoted nearly three months to arranging and demoing the material at their rehearsal space, a garage in London's Pimlico section, before going into the studio. They added a few choice covers that reflected their widening field of musical vision, such as "Brand New Cadillac," by the British rockabilly legend Vince Taylor, and "Wrong 'Em Boyo," a "Stagger Lee" takeoff by a Jamaican ska group, the Rulers.

The Clash found the perfect producer in Guy Stevens, a kindred renegade spirit with impeccable credentials (he ran the U.K. branch of Sue Records in the Sixties) and an intuitive, if lunatic, genius for getting the essence of rock & roll on record. His protégés included Free and Mott the Hoople, and he'd produced the Clash's first demos in 1976. He'd fallen from grace in the industry, but the Clash felt he was just the madman to do the job.

"We sensed it was a good way to keep it on the beam, keep our feet on the ground," Strummer says. "I think something dies in the music when everything is so straitlaced, with accountants monitoring every move."

There was nothing straitlaced about Stevens's methods, which included pouring beer into a piano when the band wanted to use it on a song over his objections and slinging chairs around "if he thought a track needed zapping up," according to Strummer. Stevens nearly hit Jones with a ladder during one take.

But Jones says Stevens — who has since died — was a "real vibe merchant" and was always "exhorting us to make it more, to increase the intensity, to lay the energy on. "Stevens had good musical instincts, too. The version of "Brand New Cadillac" on the LP is actually a warm-up take. "We said, 'Okay, now we'll do it proper,' "says Topper Headon. "And he said, 'No, it's great, let's keep it.' But we said, 'Hang on a minute, it speeds up.' And he said, 'All rock & roll speeds up.' And that was it."

The Clash quickly got into the spirit of things. The crackling at the beginning of "The Guns of Brixton" is not fire but the sound of the band members tearing Velcro strips off of leather swivel chairs swiped from the control room. "Train in Vain," the album's surprise hit, was recorded so late in the sessions that there wasn't time to include it on the cover or label copy. And there is no train in the song, either. "The track was like a train rhythm," says Jones, who wrote most of it, "and it was, once again, that feeling of being lost. So there it was."

Strangely, the Clash was slagged at home for softening up and selling out to mainstream American tastes.

"When I read that, the notion was so new to me I just laughed," Strummer says. "In that dirty room in Pimlico, with one light and filthy carpet on the walls for soundproofing, that had been the furthest thought from our minds." He also remembers the distress of one German skinhead, who cried, "My grandmother likes 'Wrong 'Em Boyo.' What have you done to me?" Strummer says, "I remember thinking, 'Is he right? Maybe we should have offended her more.'"

In fact, the Clash was simply showing its punk constituency, and the pop world at large, that there was more than one way to rock the house. The cover design of London Calling, a takeoff on Elvis Presley's first album with a photo of Paul Simonon destroying his bass onstage in New York, says it all: This is an album of classic rock & roll values with renewed spirit for a new age.

 
post #26 of 29

Michael Jackson - Thriller, for sure.

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by helionascimento View Post

Michael Jackson - Thriller, for sure.

 

Sure. Why not? It was released in '82, London Calling was released in '79, Painkiller was released in 1990.

 

I'm surprised nobody's posted "Nevermind" by Nirvana. popcorn.gif

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by StratocasterMan View Post

 

Sure. Why not? It was released in '82, London Calling was released in '79, Painkiller was released in 1990.

 

I'm surprised nobody's posted "Nevermind" by Nirvana. popcorn.gif

Oh, I thought it was the best album of 1980"s". I'm sorry.

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by StratocasterMan View Post

 

Sure. Why not? It was released in '82, London Calling was released in '79, Painkiller was released in 1990.

 

I'm surprised nobody's posted "Nevermind" by Nirvana. popcorn.gif


Maybe you should have titled your thread best album released in 1980. Semantics and technicalities aside, even if the cool kids going to record stores and buying imports got their hands on a copy of London Calling the day it was released, they would have only been able to listen to it for the last two weeks of 1979. I'm pretty sure it qualifies as one of the best album of 1980 because it's what people were listening to in 1980, and has already been mentioned it wasnt released in the US until 1980. Given that, and the fact that my BS has been co--signed by the folks at Rolling Stone, I'm aghast that you would resort to sarcasm to mock and ridicule my POV tongue_smile.gif

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