Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › 320 kbps MP3 vs. normal audio CD listening Sound quality
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

320 kbps MP3 vs. normal audio CD listening Sound quality - Page 35

post #511 of 516
Quote:
 That is precisely the part that makes no sense right there. Ask me AAC/Redbook or Redbook/AAC and I will understand. Jettison variable letters.

You may be right. The two-letter code is shorter, but I understand what you say. I'll give it a thought. Thanks!


Edited by cdvsmp3 - 6/6/14 at 1:32pm
post #512 of 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

That is precisely the part that makes no sense right there. Ask me AAC/Redbook or Redbook/AAC and I will understand. Jettison variable letters.

But you aren't supposed to know - the point is that it is blind and you don't know which is which.

post #513 of 516

This test is designed for people who design tests I think. When I'm given two sets of letters x/y and a/b and I'm told to make a choice without defining what x/y or a/b are, how am I supposed to know what to pick?

post #514 of 516

I agree that it could be done a little more clearly (I like how Foobar ABX does it, with the two reference clips A and B both playable separately, and the two test clips X and Y also playable separately), but it seems understandable to me. AB is the reference clip, which consists of a higher quality and lower quality sample in some order (A being the first sample in the reference, and B being the second sample in the reference). You have to determine if the test clip, designated as XY, has the two samples in the same order as the original reference (A first, then B, designated as AB), or if the order is reversed (B first, then A, designated as BA). At the end, the final question then asks whether A (the first clip in the reference sample) or B (the second clip in the reference sample) is the higher quality clip. This does seem like a reasonable test to me, since it looks for both the ability of the listener to distinguish between the two clips, and the ability of the listener to audibly determine which clip contains the higher resolution sample.

 

That all having been said, I don't think I could tell apart any two well-encoded files with that test. Because the reference clip has the two samples back to back, instead of having two separate reference samples (A and B), it makes it very difficult to jump back and forth between a small subsection of A vs a small subsection of B, which is the only way anyone has a hope of hearing a small, subtle difference. Foobar ABX allows you to jump back and forth between two clips while preserving your location in the clip (so when you go to clip B from ten seconds into clip A, it automatically starts clip B at 10 seconds in so there's almost no gap in the music). That kind of switching allows for the perception of very subtle audible differences that you normally wouldn't remember well enough to find.


Edited by cjl - 6/6/14 at 3:39pm
post #515 of 516

It seems to me that trying to compare two separate files is an exercise in futility. Auditory memory isn't that long. Give me a file with two samples in it and ask me if they are the same or different. That I might be able to do. I know without even trying that I can't compare two separate files that are so similar.

post #516 of 516

I am conducting a survey on the topic of lossy vs lossless files. It may interest you guys. I recommend the last version of my blind test (the shortest and easiest), but there are also previous tests comparing HD vs ACC 256 and CD vs AAC 256. Please have a look and help me in my personal research! Visit cdvsmp3.wordpress.com

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sound Science
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Sound Science › 320 kbps MP3 vs. normal audio CD listening Sound quality