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What should be my first open back headphone? - Page 2

post #16 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MalVeauX View Post

Heya,

 

From what is described, I would say the Beyer DT880 or Hifiman HE-400 would be great starting points. Both can present a balanced approach, but both can also be made bassy when you want that extra fun added to it. The HE400 is darker. The DT880 is brighter.

 

Very best,

The HE-400 does look awfully darn sexy and from what I've been able to ascertain about my preferences, I do like a darker top end. Is the HE-400 source/amp finicky?

post #17 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandala View Post

The HE-400 does look awfully darn sexy and from what I've been able to ascertain about my preferences, I do like a darker top end. Is the HE-400 source/amp finicky?

 

Heya,

 

Nope, the HE400 is very efficient and will run from anything.

 

Very best,

post #18 of 44

I would suggest the HiFiMan HE-500. I absolutely love them. Of course I don't think you mentioned what your price range is? 

 

My IEM's are shure 535, Westone 4, and FitEar 334.

post #19 of 44

Just to add my 2 cents ... the HE-400 definitely is not finicky on amp. The HE-500 is not as efficient as the HE-400 but I have zero problem running them on my MKIIIB on middle gain. It doesn't even hit half way up before it is just too loud for me. 

 

On the other hand the HE-6 I had issues running them on even high gain although that was in single ended configuration. I'll be going back and testing them out again on the MKIIIB now that I have my balanced cables. 

post #20 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandala View Post

So I have a question that may seem like I'm detouring my own thread, but it is a question that has been on my mind lately. Are full-sized headphones better, in audio quality than IEMs? The reason why I ask this is that I always seem to read IEM reviews that have qualifying statements like " the imaging is great for an IEM", or "such and such is great, almost as good as a proper headphone". 

 

I feel like I've come to the conclusion based on my limited experience, that, all other things being equal, I'm more comfortable with transducers being in my ears than covering them. The only problem is I've gotten the unspoken impression that the natural progression would be for me to eventually graduate toward a "home rig", one that consists of a large pair of closed or open full sized cans and an expensive desktop amp and DAC. I guess I'm asking out of complete ignorance, but is it common for headphone enthusiasts to stay within the realm of IEMs and pursue high fidelity within that paradigm, or am I going to reach a ceiling at some point where in order to experience the truest of true high fidelity I will need to cross over to the world of closed or open circumaurals. Forgive me if it's a stupid question, but it's one I have really been curious about. Are there aspects of performance that an IEM can't deliver (not withstanding to some degree the soundstage of an open back headphone), but a full sized headphone can, or do most people just have a preference for full-sized headphones except when lack of portability and isolation make smaller headphones a necessity? 

When I consistently get the chance to hear IEMs that can rival my LCD-2s in sound, I'll get back to you on that. The only ones I've heard that were in the same price range were the K3003 and the TG334, and yes the latter was great. Probably something like customs would come even closer. IEMs generally lack in soundstage compared to full-sized, and full-sized still lack in comparison to speaker. I find that IEMs can be more resolving than full-sized, and etc, etc. Full-sized headphones are a nice in-between, having a bit of both the convenience and enveloping sound. 

 

Back on topic, now. I think that the HE-300/HE-400 series would be good for you in terms of comfort. Because for all the problems people have with HiFiMAN phones in terms of comfort, one thing people cannot complain about is the size of the cups. They are 60mm in diameter, and the pads are more than enough enveloping for any ear size. They will probably not touch your ears much. They both have decent bass quantity, with the HE-400s being a bit more linear, tighter, extending further, being more tactile, and faster, even beating the HE-500's bass. Very easy to drive as well.

post #21 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jliu View Post

I would suggest the HiFiMan HE-500. I absolutely love them. Of course I don't think you mentioned what your price range is? 

 

My IEM's are shure 535, Westone 4, and FitEar 334.

 My budget is $500 or lower. 

post #22 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

When I consistently get the chance to hear IEMs that can rival my LCD-2s in sound, I'll get back to you on that. The only ones I've heard that were in the same price range were the K3003 and the TG334, and yes the latter was great. Probably something like customs would come even closer. IEMs generally lack in soundstage compared to full-sized, and full-sized still lack in comparison to speaker. I find that IEMs can be more resolving than full-sized, and etc, etc. Full-sized headphones are a nice in-between, having a bit of both the convenience and enveloping sound. 

 

Back on topic, now. I think that the HE-300/HE-400 series would be good for you in terms of comfort. Because for all the problems people have with HiFiMAN phones in terms of comfort, one thing people cannot complain about is the size of the cups. They are 60mm in diameter, and the pads are more than enough enveloping for any ear size. They will probably not touch your ears much. They both have decent bass quantity, with the HE-400s being a bit more linear, tighter, extending further, being more tactile, and faster, even beating the HE-500's bass. Very easy to drive as well.

Thank you for your reply, TwinQY. That's exactly what I've been wanting to know. On a side note, you brought up something I've been wondering about for quite a while. What does resolving mean? Out of all of the terminology used to describe headphone performance, it's the one term that I can't quite figure out. 

post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandala View Post

Thank you for your reply, TwinQY. That's exactly what I've been wanting to know. On a side note, you brought up something I've been wondering about for quite a while. What does resolving mean? Out of all of the terminology used to describe headphone performance, it's the one term that I can't quite figure out. 

 

Resolution (audio term)

A numeric measurement defining the smallest detail, which in turn defines the level of accuracy of representation

 

post #24 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

 

Resolution (audio term)

A numeric measurement defining the smallest detail, which in turn defines the level of accuracy of representation

 

Okay, how is desribing an headphone as being very resolving different than saying it has excellent detail retrieval?

post #25 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandala View Post

Okay, how is desribing an headphone as being very resolving different than saying it has excellent detail retrieval?

Nope, there's no difference at all tongue.gif. Such is the mystery of audiophilia...

 

But seriously speaking, what I gather from that is that there seems to be a difference between details and accuracy of the sound. Bah, audio terms are too confusing. That's why it's so much easier to say "a broad emphasis from 300-1000Hz", than "warm sounding". 

post #26 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

Nope, there's no difference at all tongue.gif. Such is the mystery of audiophilia...

 

But seriously speaking, what I gather from that is that there seems to be a difference between details and accuracy of the sound. Bah, audio terms are too confusing. That's why it's so much easier to say "a broad emphasis from 300-1000Hz", than "warm sounding". 

Well, either way I've learned many new things today so i thank you and everyone who's been involved in this thread, although my wallet happens to be muttering some choice expletives at the moment, lol.

post #27 of 44
Thread Starter 

Ugh, decisions decisions...

 

Weighing the pros and cons between an Heir Audio 4.Ai and a HiFiMan HE-400... Apples & cannonballs, I know.

post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandala View Post

Ugh, decisions decisions...

 

Weighing the pros and cons between an Heir Audio 4.Ai and a HiFiMan HE-400... Apples & cannonballs, I know.

From what I remember after literally seconds with the 4.Ai, the HE-400 would stomp all over them. Way too short of an audition to get a proper grasp of sound, but as you said, apples and cannonballs. Probably won't need an amp like with the HiFiMANs, though.

post #29 of 44

you don't need an amp for the HE-400.

post #30 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

From what I remember after literally seconds with the 4.Ai, the HE-400 would stomp all over them. Way too short of an audition to get a proper grasp of sound, but as you said, apples and cannonballs. Probably won't need an amp like with the HiFiMANs, though.

Well, I've been told that I won't to need an amp with the HE-400, which I'm assuming to be a half-truth and that the SQ of the HE-400 scales up quite a bit with a decent desktop amp. Would my E!& be sufficient?

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