Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › EQ curve question...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

EQ curve question...

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I saw this ad in an audiofile magazine advertizing a high end microphone. Can someone tell me if this curve is just specific to mic's or not? I'm testing the high end as an EQ setting and it does really open up the highs without any problems yet.

 

Thanks,

 

Dana

 

post #2 of 7

IMO, all EQing does, is make your gear sound good to your own ears. What one person thinks is perfect, may be a bit too bright/warm to another.

 

If there is some "sound science" involved here I'm not aware of, I'd also welcome someone more knowledgeable to chime in here.

post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by J.Pocalypse View Post

IMO, all EQing does, is make your gear sound good to your own ears. What one person thinks is perfect, may be a bit too bright/warm to another.

 

If there is some "sound science" involved here I'm not aware of, I'd also welcome someone more knowledgeable to chime in here.


Exactly this

Sent from my HTC Desire V using Tapatalk 2
post #4 of 7

It looks like the magazine snippet is THE specific frequency response/ability of THIS microphone, and not an added EQ. Meaning that this mic is mostly very neutral. 

post #5 of 7

all these curves are not "real", cause what you get depends on many things, like the room, the pre mic, etc.....

post #6 of 7

What I see, and what the claim says is that the mic can capture the frequency spectrum exactly at the ambient level.

 

Meaning, it doesn't under-capture certain parts, so you don't have to +ve EQ them later to make it neutral.

 

When it comes to playback, you can find speakers with this kind of flatness. This one is taken from Neumann monitors:

 

 

 

 

Theoretically, the mic above paired with the speaker here corresponds to a perfectly neutral setup. 

 

If you want this on your own setup, you'll need to know the frequency respones of your speakers, and +ve/-ve EQ the portions that are lower/higher, respectively.

 

However, it doesn't mean they'll sound good. 

What you hear is not the speakers alone, its also the room acoustics, and certain settings work better for regular rooms than acoustically treated studio environments.

Another factor is whether the speakers are near field or not. These ^^ may sound neutral in a near field setup, but may not work as well when used as bookshelf units.

 

Also, the EQ you do is just telling you about the signal you're passing into the speakers. Whether or not does it translate in to that sound is dependent on the speaker characteristics. 

For example, you may want to increase the bass by 10dB, but that doesn't mean the speaker will also increase the bass by 10dB. Some may overdo it, some may under perform, or give distortion.


Edited by proton007 - 9/30/12 at 10:02pm
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for the replies, I see now that it's a Freq. R. curve. I did learn a little more about EQ'ing at the high end tho!! I have some old songs that really opened up with the high end raised a little.

 

 

 

Dana

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Computer Audio
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Computer Audio › EQ curve question...