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PONO - Neil Youngs portable hi-res music player - Page 52

post #766 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kendoji View Post

Everyone has seen the charts and knows the mathematical differences. It's more a matter that under test conditions it turns out that all that extra 'data' is inaudible.


...and the conclusion that seems to have been drawn by 99.999% of internet commentators from those charts is "That means that my iPhone sounds as good as a Pono player, 'cause they can both play the same files". After all, "bits is bits", as people are wont to say at the drop of a hat.


Edited by PalJoey - 4/16/14 at 10:37am
post #767 of 4585
One of the local guys claimed that he can hear the difference between 16 and 24-bit audio. Upon doing a volume-matched ABX test, he failed. XD

The only purpose for 24-bit audio is for manipulation of the signals without degrading the audio quality. Using it as a marketing gimmick for "high resolution audio" like the Pono campaign is just plain LAME (MP3, buh-dum-tss).
post #768 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

One of the local guys claimed that he can hear the difference between 16 and 24-bit audio. Upon doing a volume-matched ABX test, he failed. XD

The only purpose for 24-bit audio is for manipulation of the signals without degrading the audio quality. Using it as a marketing gimmick for "high resolution audio" like the Pono campaign is just plain LAME (MP3, buh-dum-tss).


So we should convert everything 320kbps mp3 and be done with it? More capacity yay!

post #769 of 4585
Only a double blind will tell who's right.
Edited by hughscot - 4/16/14 at 11:10am
post #770 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post
 

 

They haven't had DRM in several years now, and the iTunes $$$ is still rolling in. 

Isn't Apple's "FairPlay" encryption used on itunes files a Digital Rights Management technology? (DRM)  

post #771 of 4585

Once I get my customs remolded (I am having fit issues now) I will do many tests with volume matched blind ABX. Then I will see if it is worth to have 16 bit or 24 bit etc. Then depends on it I will change my files.

 

I think I am sure about it, better mastering plays way much more important role than the bits and sample rates...

post #772 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughscot View Post

Only a double bind will tell who's right.

I didn't know such a medical condition existed. That must be horrible :-(
post #773 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughscot View Post

Only a double blind will tell who's right.

Don't be so sure about that, I've heard double def tell me who's right

post #774 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

One of the local guys claimed that he can hear the difference between 16 and 24-bit audio. Upon doing a volume-matched ABX test, he failed. XD
 

 

almost everybody will fail at almost every ABX test (DAPs, DACs, amps, etc...).

post #775 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Replicant187 View Post

almost everybody will fail at almost every ABX test (DAPs, DACs, amps, etc...).
But surely the differences are so egregiously audible that said tests should be easy to pass, right?
post #776 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tympan View Post
 

Isn't Apple's "FairPlay" encryption used on itunes files a Digital Rights Management technology? (DRM)  

 

They stopped using that on the music files several years ago, although older purchased files would still have it. It does still exist on the video purchases though, I believe.

 

Quote:

No more DRM by the end of March

iTunes Plus is Apple’s DRM-free encoding for the iTunes Store; music is encoded using the Advanced Audio Codec format (AAC) at 256Kbps. Beginning today, 8 million of the iTunes Store’s 10 million songs will be offered without DRM; the entire catalog is expected to go DRM-free by the end of the first calendar quarter of 2009.

Users who have already purchased music from the iTunes Store protected with Apple’s FairPlay DRM will be able to upgrade their entire library of previously-purchased songs, though an additional fee is required—30 cents per song.

http://www.macworld.com/article/1137946/itunestore.html

post #777 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Replicant187 View Post
 

 

almost everybody will fail at almost every ABX test (DAPs, DACs, amps, etc...).

^^^ :eek: ^^^

post #778 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post
 

 

They stopped using that on the music files several years ago, although older purchased files would still have it. It does still exist on the video purchases though, I believe.

 

http://www.macworld.com/article/1137946/itunestore.html

Cool, thanks, I did not know that. So, if I buy 10 DRM-free albums from itunes, drag and drop them on a USB key and send them to a friend, he will be able to open and play them, right?

post #779 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tympan View Post
 

^^^ :eek: ^^^

 

exception proves the rule ;)

post #780 of 4585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tympan View Post

Cool, thanks, I did not know that. So, if I buy 10 DRM-free albums from itunes, drag and drop them on a USB key and send them to a friend, he will be able to open and play them, right?
Yes, however your customer id IS encrypted into them so if they pop up on p2p apple can potentially identify where they came from.
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