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HE-500, LCD2, D5000, DT770, SR80, on a speaker amp (Emotiva mini-X A-100) Project - Page 197

post #2941 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsh View Post
 

Should there be any negative voltage signal unless we are talking balanced? 

No, all speaker and headphone outputs are true AC. Positive voltage moves the speaker cone outward, negative pulls the cone inward. The electrons flowing through the speaker wires trully flow one direction to push the speaker cone and reverse their flow to pull the speaker cone.

 

From my "How Tube Guitar Amplifiers Work" webpage:

Quote:
The output transformer sends the stepped up signal through the blue wire to the speaker jack and on to the speaker. The audio signal flows through the speaker's voice coil which generates a magnetic force. This magnetic force is either attracted to or repelled by the speaker's magnet. This attraction and repulsion moves the speaker cone back and forth to create air pressure waves that our ears experience as sound--the sweet sound of electric guitar. For every movement of the guitar string the amplifier generates a corresponding movement of the speaker cone.
post #2942 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by robrob View Post
 

Armaegis, after thinking about the reverse current blocking diodes I realized we're working with an AC audio signal. Wouldn't reverse current blocking diodes act as half-wave rectifiers and remove the negative voltage half of the audio signal?

 

I was thinking two zener diodes per channel like you find in most Ultrasones (and a few Sennheisers I think), but I guess that only protects from overvoltage. A fuse is probably the simplest protection against short circuits.

post #2943 of 3639
emotiva stack :P
The new replacement emotiva has no more imbalance problems from the little listening I did so far. I'm happy now smily_headphones1.gif
post #2944 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimzerz View Post

emotiva stack :P
The new replacement emotiva has no more imbalance problems from the little listening I did so far. I'm happy now smily_headphones1.gif

Don't you dare running them as mono-blocks like I do!  :beerchug:

post #2945 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by koiloco View Post

Don't you dare running them as mono-blocks like I do!  beerchug.gif
OH MY GOD my cousin said that and then I realized that the trs adapter wouldn't work with it cause then they'd be considered non-common grounds, right?
post #2946 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimzerz View Post


OH MY GOD my cousin said that and then I realized that the trs adapter wouldn't work with it cause then they'd be considered non-common grounds, right?

Correct!  I don't think the Mini-X can be bridged to run as mono and double the output.  I was just teasing you.

post #2947 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimzerz View Post


OH MY GOD my cousin said that and then I realized that the trs adapter wouldn't work with it cause then they'd be considered non-common grounds, right?

 

Monoblocks can never be common ground.

post #2948 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taowolf51 View Post
 

 

Monoblocks can never be common ground.


I figured haha

post #2949 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by koiloco View Post
 

Correct!  I don't think the Mini-X can be bridged to run as mono and double the output.  I was just teasing you.

 

It's doable... but you'd need to recable your headphones for "balanced", some XLR to RCA adapters, then make a banana to XLR4 adapter. Or I suppose if both your Mini-X's are done up with a TRS in front, you could make a dual TRS to XLR4 adapter... or something like that. Mind you I'd want to verify various things with a multimeter first, as I do not have a Mini-X to experiment with. If none of this paragraph made sense, then don't try it.

post #2950 of 3639

How would you bridge the two channels per amp?  Would you connect the two + speaker posts together to feed one headphone driver?

post #2951 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by robrob View Post
 

How would you bridge the two channels per amp?  Would you connect the two + speaker posts together to feed one headphone driver?

 

Same question as robrob.  On pro-audio amps, this is very straight forward.  I used to bridge amps all the times and run speakers in series.  The reason I am interested is because I am getting some speakers later on.  I could get another Mini-X and well, run the 2 as mono-blocks.  Let's just focus on the speaker outputs in the back and ignore HP mod for a second.  How would you verify that you can safely bridge the 2 channels and increase output pwr? 

post #2952 of 3639

First step would be to email Emotiva and ask directly if it's safe.

 

You can try a dummy load with a high ohm resistor and very carefully raise levels and measure with a multimeter (if you know what the single ended voltage should be, then running it bridged should be double). If that's ok, try a lower value resistor.

 

Again, I don't know for certain if this will work. "In theory", you can just bridge the outputs to double the voltage swing assuming you've rigged your inputs, but no guarantee that the circuitry can provide the required current (although with a headphone load this is a moot point).


Edited by Armaegis - 12/28/13 at 3:00pm
post #2953 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post
 

You can try a dummy load with a high ohm resistor and very carefully raise levels and measure with a multimeter (if you know what the single ended voltage should be, then running it bridged should be double). If that's ok, try a lower value resistor.

 

That sounds like something that might start a fire, burn down your house and all of London!

 

I kid, I kid :D

post #2954 of 3639

A dummy load with a high ohm value, to limit the amount of current (and thus heat) that can flow through. Very different from short circuiting.


Edited by Armaegis - 12/28/13 at 3:04pm
post #2955 of 3639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post
 

A dummy load with a high ohm value, to limit the amount of current (and thus heat) that can flow through. Very different from short circuiting.

Yea, I know. I have a selection of 50 and 100 watt dummy loads for guitar & audio amps and a 50 ohm 100 watt used for radio transmitter work.


Edited by robrob - 12/29/13 at 5:22am
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