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HE-500, LCD2, D5000, DT770, SR80, on a speaker amp (Emotiva mini-X A-100) Project - Page 189

post #2821 of 3790

Who said anything about DC? Any signal across a low impedance/resistance will pull a ton of current.

 

If both +'s were connected together at the TRS plug, then no there was no 40ohm separating them.

post #2822 of 3790
No no it was balanced cabling! No trs, only ground was coupled in the amp
post #2823 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

Who said anything about DC? Any signal across a low impedance/resistance will pull a ton of current.

If both +'s were connected together at the TRS plug, then no there was no 40ohm separating them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsh View Post

No no it was balanced cabling! No trs, only ground was coupled in the amp

I think that's my issue with the TRS and why the amp shut itself down. Didn't you connect the +'s to one driver and the grounds to the other?
post #2824 of 3790

I was looking at Sonido's picture and in the third pic it looks like he shorted the +'s together.

post #2825 of 3790
I disconnect one driver to plus, one to minus. Neither of the drivers work
post #2826 of 3790


Not sure why the grounded driver doesn't work either though.

post #2827 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonido View Post
 


Not sure why the grounded driver doesn't work either though.

Maybe there's a hole other reason. I begin to think that is so. Perhaps the amp was turned on with the headphones plugged in or something. Dunno. But yes, it was plugged in like above illustration shows.

 

Guess I have bothered everyone for long enough.

post #2828 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsh View Post
 

Maybe there's a hole other reason. I begin to think that is so. Perhaps the amp was turned on with the headphones plugged in or something. Dunno. But yes, it was plugged in like above illustration shows.

 

Guess I have bothered everyone for long enough.

I see what you did there ;) Really though, I feel very bad. I can't imagine how I would react if my HE-500's blew a driver :/


Edited by Nimzerz - 12/19/13 at 5:22pm
post #2829 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsh View Post

 

Perhaps the amp was turned on with the headphones plugged in or something.

Emotivas are usually very good about being safe when turned on. I can turn my XPA-200 on when my headphones are plugged in without issue, no popping.

post #2830 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimzerz View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsh View Post
 

Maybe there's a hole other reason. I begin to think that is so. Perhaps the amp was turned on with the headphones plugged in or something. Dunno. But yes, it was plugged in like above illustration shows.

 

Guess I have bothered everyone for long enough.

I see what you did there ;) Really though, I feel very bad. I can't imagine how I would react if my HE-500's blew a driver :/

You don't want to know how stupid I felt because I initially thought it was purely my own fault because of switching cables around so I thought something shorted. Lol, I was kinda depressed for several hours after. But actually I am not that closely attached to my 500's anymore. You know Stax spoils you rotten... And slowly makes you one of 'Them' ;) If I just weren't to buy all that vintage stuff. Gawd, I hate when one of my headphones don't work, I cringe inside (thinking about my stax sigs, has dust in the driver)


Edited by davidsh - 12/19/13 at 5:36pm
post #2831 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taowolf51 View Post
 

Emotivas are usually very good about being safe when turned on. I can turn my XPA-200 on when my headphones are plugged in without issue, no popping.


I always turn the Emotiva off and on with the headphones plugged in. I just always make sure to turn down the volume after I'm done using it :P

post #2832 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimzerz View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taowolf51 View Post
 

Emotivas are usually very good about being safe when turned on. I can turn my XPA-200 on when my headphones are plugged in without issue, no popping.


I always turn the Emotiva off and on with the headphones plugged in. I just always make sure to turn down the volume after I'm done using it :P

I always turn down the volume when unplugging, plugging and turning on/off. Just a habit, hopefully a good one. 

post #2833 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by robrob View Post
 

Each stereo channel's + terminal is connected to an AC wave generator (amplifier). Normally when the wave is a positive voltage it wants to push electrons through the headphone + wire, through the drivers, then through the cable shield to ground. When the AC wave is negative the electrons are pulled in the opposite direction back to the wave generator (amplifier).

 

When you combine two AC wave generators at the TRS plug the the waves from each amplifier combine--two positive voltage waves will make a higher voltage, higher amplitude wave = more voltage and loudness at the drivers. All that positive voltage meets at the TRS plug and pushes together up the cable to the headphones and down to ground. All the electrons still want to flow to ground.

 

When a positive and negative voltage wave combine they weaken each other and if they're equal they will cancel themselves and the electrons will flow from the positive wave voltage to the negative wave--so electrons can flow from one + terminal to the other + terminal--shorting each other out and mostly bypassing the headphone drivers.

 

When two negative voltage waves meet it's basically the opposite of when two positives meet.

 

So what happens depends on the audio signal waves when they meet at the TRS plug.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Armego
 If L+ and R+ were also connected to the headphone, well, the "proper" way to look at it is each circuit separately, then sum the results. Things don't really "join" then "split", it's more accurate that they sum/overlap at the common paths (it may seem like semantics, but it's important to note the difference). This overlap can potentially do damage if the summed signal is very large. It was probably a combination of this and a surge on the amp end that blew the hole in your driver. Maybe. Just an educated guess from me.

The L+ and R+ were both playing music, L+ and R+ were also connected to the headphones. 

 

How do you go from what I said in quotes above to what you said above and react with this? :

 

Quote:
 Argh. Rob. No.

 

That's not... that's not how it works. I mean, there's a sort of rudimentary idea in there and I can see where you're trying to go, but... no.

 

You're saying the same thing I said except you moved your hand like this (waving hand laterally over the conference room table).

 

The amplifier's output audio signal is an AC wave.  Like I said, when two positive voltage waves or two negative voltage waves combine their voltage amplitudes are added together (summed) and that double voltage spike could generate enough heat in the headphone drivers to melt something and "blow the drivers." Nothing I originally said is wrong, and yet I get a freakin' "Argh." Argh.


Edited by robrob - 12/19/13 at 6:05pm
post #2834 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by robrob View Post
 
 
Am I supposed to find this amusing? (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by robrob View Post
 

Each stereo channel's + terminal is connected to an AC wave generator (amplifier). Normally when the wave is a positive voltage it wants to push electrons through the headphone + wire, through the drivers, then through the cable shield to ground. When the AC wave is negative the electrons are pulled in the opposite direction back to the wave generator (amplifier).

 

When you combine two AC wave generators at the TRS plug the the waves from each amplifier combine--two positive voltage waves will make a higher voltage, higher amplitude wave = more voltage and loudness at the drivers. All that positive voltage meets at the TRS plug and pushes together up the cable to the headphones and down to ground. All the electrons still want to flow to ground.

 

When a positive and negative voltage wave combine they weaken each other and if they're equal they will cancel themselves and the electrons will flow from the positive wave voltage to the negative wave--so electrons can flow from one + terminal to the other + terminal--shorting each other out and mostly bypassing the headphone drivers.

 

When two negative voltage waves meet it's basically the opposite of when two positives meet.

 

So what happens depends on the audio signal waves when they meet at the TRS plug.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amregis
 If L+ and R+ were also connected to the headphone, well, the "proper" way to look at it is each circuit separately, then sum the results. Things don't really "join" then "split", it's more accurate that they sum/overlap at the common paths (it may seem like semantics, but it's important to note the difference). This overlap can potentially do damage if the summed signal is very large. It was probably a combination of this and a surge on the amp end that blew the hole in your driver. Maybe. Just an educated guess from me.

The L+ and R+ were both playing music, L+ and R+ were also connected to the headphones. 

 

How do you go from what I said in quotes above to what you said above and react with this? :

 

Quote:
 Argh. Rob. No.

 

That's not... that's not how it works. I mean, there's a sort of rudimentary idea in there and I can see where you're trying to go, but... no.

 

You're saying the same thing I said except you moved your hand like this (waving hand laterally over the conference room table).

 

The amplifier's output audio signal is an AC wave.  Like I said, when two positive voltage waves or two negative voltage waves combine their voltage amplitudes are added together (summed) and that double voltage spike could generate enough heat in the headphone drivers to melt something and "blow the drivers." Nothing I originally said is wrong, and yet I get a freakin' "Argh." Argh.

 

Okay, potentially the power spikes can be quadroubled this way. Not good, but spikes as it would happen with music will not melt a driver. I am positive you need prolonged audio signals or DC. Whatever. What are we even talking about right now... I am almost lost. Are we discussing something?

post #2835 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post
 

Who said anything about DC? Any signal across a low impedance/resistance will pull a ton of current.

 

If both +'s were connected together at the TRS plug, then no there was no 40ohm separating them.

The 40ohms weren't separating the two + signals, it was separating the combined signals at the TRS plug with ground.

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