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head fi really is a wallet drainer - Page 2

post #16 of 35

Basically any hobby can be...

post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by kn19h7 View Post

Basically any hobby can be...

 

^^this is about it^^

post #18 of 35
Thread Starter 

I'd like to hear some of those pricier cans you guys talk about sometime as well.  We all know its a point of diminishing returns after awhile.  

 

For instance, I was blown away the first time I heard a mid-fi speaker never hearing anything better than consumer systems.  It was my friend's dads old B&W 600 series floorstanders powered by an Aragon multi-channel amp and I was in grade school.  When I got my own place, I had the same blown away feeling buying my first system which was an Onkyo receiver with Paradigm Monitor 9v2s.

 

Fast forward and I audition some higher-fi systems such as ML Summits and Wilson Sophias powered by decent amps.  These are speakers in the $10-$12k range whereas my Paradigms were in the $1k.  Impressed by the pricey stuff?  Sure.  Blown away?  Not really.  The Wilsons were even a bit of a let down due to their signature.

post #19 of 35

The trick is to trade rather than acquire more. Granted, I hardly listen to my own advice... 

post #20 of 35

Tell me about it...

 

It wasn't too bad when I first started with an AD700, but then I saw a Stax Lambda setup for sale at an unusually low price and bought it. Now I'm hopelessly spoiled by the sound presentation (to the point where I didn't even like the newer SR-202 as much) and have to face the hard reality that if I want another Normal bias Lambda, it won't come that cheaply, and the dedicated amps to drive these things will probably cost more than the headphones themselves if I really want to replace my receiver + transformer box setup for amplification.

 

If there's any consolation, headphones don't depreciate nearly as badly as computer parts do. That $1,500 computer you just built won't sell for even half of that a year later...

post #21 of 35
Thread Starter 

So far from my 3 pairs of full sizers (M50s, DT770 80ohm, and DJ1 Pros), the M50s and DT770s are vying for first place and the DJ1 Pros are just a huge let down.  I really wanted to like them.  They reach probably the deepest of the 3 when asked but they sound like they have a massive dip in the upper bass, lower-mids.  It takes away most of the weight of male vocals.  It also seems to have another big dip in the lower treble region so its not very bright and sounds like its missing detail there.  I have a feeling these are going to be sold.  The S-Logic effect is interesting though honestly I can achieve this through DSP plug ins.  Its really too bad.

 

My main speakers are Onix Strata Minis which are a 3 way planar magnetic design plus a speedy little 8" sub at the bottom.  They have that great detail planars and ribbon speakers have that I love and have transient responses similiar to mid-price Martin Logans but with better soundstaging and off-axis response.   Now to find that in a relatively cheap price .... smily_headphones1.gif

post #22 of 35
Thread Starter 

I have to say, listening to these three full size headphones, I'm getting to really appreciate the AKG K422s.  I got them for $27 off amazon brand new and they're still under $50 there.  They seem to be the DT770s little brother.  Besides the really comfy cloth pads, they share a similar sonic signature.  The DT770s reach lower and have more details in the highs but the K422s aren't as V-shaped sounding as the M50s.  They are a bit brighter than the PX200 IIs which have that dark Sennheiser sound.  The biggest problem with the K422s is the bass can be muddy.  Overall, a steal under $50 for a pair of open folding portables.  Really enjoying these.

post #23 of 35
First I got hifiman hm-602, then hisoundaudio studio V 3rd and AKG K550...

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post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by NamelessPFG View Post

If there's any consolation, headphones don't depreciate nearly as badly as computer parts do. That $1,500 computer you just built won't sell for even half of that a year later...

This. A few headphones can even be a, um... sound investment. I bought a SR-007 for $1450 and now it's worth a lot more than that.

You need to buy used, buy smart, take care of your gear, and don't buy into the latest FOTM, or you'll end up wasting tons of money on a shiny doorstop that you can't sell (I've done that too).

DIY is an even better way to go. As the headphone market matures, and prices escalate while value for dollar goes down, DIY becomes a far more attractive option to get a good deal - and at some point may become the only option. If you get good enough at it, you'll be able to get your hands on something so good that you simply won't be able to find it commercially (like the DIY version of the Stax T2).

There are worse hobbies financially. Wait till you get your first really good 35mm DSLR and find out that none of your zoom lenses are good enough anymore. Or until enough people whisper in your ear those two horror and jealously inducing words for any aspiring photographer... "medium format."
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by catscratch View Post


DIY is an even better way to go. As the headphone market matures, and prices escalate while value for dollar goes down, DIY becomes a far more attractive option to get a good deal - and at some point may become the only option. If you get good enough at it, you'll be able to get your hands on something so good that you simply won't be able to find it commercially (like the DIY version of the Stax T2).

 

This is a big "if"... and it can be quite costly (money and time) getting there. Not saying DIY isn't worth it, but as far as money savers go... not really. 

post #26 of 35

Since i started getting into vintage gear,i find i can have very good sound quality,for very little money,in fact in Saturday i'm going to pickup a mint (according to the seller) little Marantz 2215B reciever,now,the way i see it,i'm getting a decent preamp,amp,tuner,headphone amp,and phonostage,for a $100,so you can see why i feel i'm getting a good deal even if i'm paying the average price.

 

When i think that for the price of a cartless Rega RP3 turntable,i bought three mint vintage turntables,and three new cartridges,for those interested,i got a Yamaha YP-D6,and two Marantzs,a 6300 and a 6350Q,and the cartridges are,an Ortofon 2M Blue,and two Audio-Technica AT95e,by the way,i have nothing against the RP3,i just used it as an example because it's price matched the amout i've spent.

 

I'm not saying that vintage gear is everything to everyone,to each is own,but for me,vintage gear is where it's at,,,for now at least.

post #27 of 35
Thread Starter 

DIY would definately be interesting but where to even start?

 

Maybe something like this $179 Audience A3 full range driver ?? biggrin.gif

 

http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=296-220

post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by catscratch View Post
This. A few headphones can even be a, um... sound investment. I bought a SR-007 for $1450 and now it's worth a lot more than that.
You need to buy used, buy smart, take care of your gear, and don't buy into the latest FOTM, or you'll end up wasting tons of money on a shiny doorstop that you can't sell (I've done that too).
DIY is an even better way to go. As the headphone market matures, and prices escalate while value for dollar goes down, DIY becomes a far more attractive option to get a good deal - and at some point may become the only option. If you get good enough at it, you'll be able to get your hands on something so good that you simply won't be able to find it commercially (like the DIY version of the Stax T2).
There are worse hobbies financially. Wait till you get your first really good 35mm DSLR and find out that none of your zoom lenses are good enough anymore. Or until enough people whisper in your ear those two horror and jealously inducing words for any aspiring photographer... "medium format."

 

Buying used is definitely the way to go most of the time, be it headphones, computers, cameras, cars, or most other equipment. I couldn't possibly afford Stax otherwise.

 

Keeping a level head amidst all the hype for cheap FOTMs also helps. The less incremental cheap gear you buy, the more you have for the really good stuff.

 

I considered DIY for things like the ExStatA, but the prices seem higher for even that amp design compared to just buying an SRM-1/Mk2 Pro. The complete ones I've seen for sale are up in the $800 range. What does it take to get an affordable electrostatic amp these days (other than the usual speaker amp + transformer approach, or settling for a little SRM-212 or SRM-252)?

 

...Oh god, you brought up camera equipment. As much as I'd like to have a DSLR, the bodies are stupid expensive, and the lenses doubly so. Then there's that whole Foveon (Sigma) vs. Bayer (everybody else) sensor debate, and this is before we get into medium/large film format, expensive brands like Leica and Hasselblad, etc.

 

Meanwhile, I picked up this old Pentax Spotmatic in nice condition from a thrift store for a mere $15.75. I'd need to shoot and develop a whole lot of 135 film rolls before it approaches the cost of an entry-level DSLR that probably has worse image quality in the end, if more convenience due to digital.

 

Being constrained to M42 screw mount lenses does limit my lens options (K mount would have really helped since it's still in use today), but on the other hand, it's said that a lot of those vintage lenses are actually pretty good for the money if you don't mind not having auto-focus.

 

...Crap, I think I just derailed the thread with that tangent. Point is, it's not just headphones; any hobby will suck your wallet dry if you're not careful.

post #29 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NamelessPFG View Post

If there's any consolation, headphones don't depreciate nearly as badly as computer parts do. That $1,500 computer you just built won't sell for even half of that a year later...

 

I haven't built any new systems in awhile after switching to laptops.  And I end up selling and buying a new laptop every year to year and a half.  

post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by vormhat View Post
I haven't built any new systems in awhile after switching to laptops.  And I end up selling and buying a new laptop every year to year and a half.  

 

That's fine if laptops do the job for you, but unfortunately for my wallet, I'm a PC gamer that demands desktop power and expandability for things like good sound cards (heightened by how no USB audio device has the capabilities of a proper X-Fi card), along with constant 60 FPS.

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