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post #4471 of 6201

8GB? 

 

Microcenter usually have better deals then Newegg. From what I've been hearing Newegg has poor after sales service (i.e returns, DOA, faulty components and RMA).

post #4472 of 6201
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

8GB? 

 

Microcenter usually have better deals then Newegg. From what I've been hearing Newegg has poor after sales service (i.e returns, DOA, faulty components and RMA).

Microcenter is the best.

Brother has replaced his PSU at least 8 times over the course a year (Inland/Microcenter) brand.  He takes in the PSU without a receipt and gets a replacement.

Pretty good service if you ask me...  Their RAM is cheaper, but if it is the same quality as their thumb drives, steer clear.

 

Newegg is a hassle, not to mention shipping.  Microcenter has better Motherboard+CPU deals every day

post #4473 of 6201
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

8GB? 

 

Microcenter usually have better deals then Newegg. From what I've been hearing Newegg has poor after sales service (i.e returns, DOA, faulty components and RMA).

I've never had problems with aftersales form Newegg. They always offer me free RMA or shipping back etc

post #4474 of 6201
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

Failure rate for my company as well as all RMA's processed by the 5 big major suppliers that import and export parts from overseas into Australia and relations with every other registered computing business in Australia. It excludes the OEM sector because they have there own suppliers and contractors which are NDA'd from regular folks snooping into for information. But OEM's use Hynix based IC's and don't use Corsair, G.SKill or OCZ so it doesn't matter.

 

Tech reports from reviewers as well as announcement from G.Skill and OCZ as well as other users from forums and the like confirm what I've said as well. The original G.Skill Ripjaws failed like no tomorrow, the early OCZ Vertex lineup had a lot of problems with the Indilinx nand flash controller chipset it was using. 

 

This doesn't make the company to stand out as being bad just a raise of pre-caution for what you pay for there is a reason why both G.Skill and OCZ have cheap equivalents of other big brands that have a higher reliability rate (although OCZ is moving in the right direction with there current Sandforce ssd's), G.Skills are still a hit and miss but there warranty makes up for it.

Quote:
 Failure rate for my company as well as all RMA's processed by the 5 big major suppliers that import and export parts from overseas into Australia and relations with every other registered computing business in Australia. It excludes the OEM sector because they have there own suppliers and contractors which are NDA'd from regular folks snooping into for information. But OEM's use Hynix based IC's and don't use Corsair, G.SKill or OCZ so it doesn't matter.

This is the most important part. Everything else you said was irrelevant or was based on perception and other stuff. But even this doesn't have much base in it.

 

One would need to then ask. If there was a specific model or 'bin' that Australian companies that you somewhat cited used more than others. If so, how do these differ from retail models or do they. And then we would also need to know if Gskill or other companies take different measures for RAM sold like this. Do they keep them in sub-optimal rooms/containers etc as opposed to retail. One would also then need to even ask if the RAM that was sent to the 5 majaor ones was Australia specific and if it was country specific parts. Another question would then be in what year would the data be relevant and if any events happened within 1-2 years of the data that may have led to such sub-optimal performnace.

 

I also would need to know what it is you mean by 5 major supplieers. Are they actually major and if so, how major. What percentage of the market do they serve, and what makret do they serve/service. And also into what models they each get and how they differ. etc.

 

But basically, while reporting what you said is good info to take note of. Unless I have a research paper on questions like this that I am asking AND more with analyzation. I won't and can't take any of it to be of any truth that I should note.

post #4475 of 6201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yazen View Post
 

lol

The guy on the left is hardly an enthusiast.  Looks like one of "those" gamers...

 

 

He should be lugging one of these:

 

 

Do not associate us with that scum bowei.  :D

That's not a gaming rig though. That's a terrible looking HDD tank that probably has terrible temps...

post #4476 of 6201

8gb ram? I got 2x4gb 1600MHz sticks of Corsair dominator ram for $55 on ebay.

 

Don't know how much this will go up, mine was "buy it now"

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CORSAIR-Dominator-8GB-2-x-4GB-240-Pin-DDR3-SDRAM-DDR3-1600-PC3-12800-/171230935463?pt=US_Memory_RAM_&hash=item27de28b9a7

post #4477 of 6201
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 

This is the most important part. Everything else you said was irrelevant or was based on perception and other stuff. But even this doesn't have much base in it.

 

One would need to then ask. If there was a specific model or 'bin' that Australian companies that you somewhat cited used more than others. If so, how do these differ from retail models or do they. And then we would also need to know if Gskill or other companies take different measures for RAM sold like this. Do they keep them in sub-optimal rooms/containers etc as opposed to retail. One would also then need to even ask if the RAM that was sent to the 5 majaor ones was Australia specific and if it was country specific parts. Another question would then be in what year would the data be relevant and if any events happened within 1-2 years of the data that may have led to such sub-optimal performnace.

 

I also would need to know what it is you mean by 5 major supplieers. Are they actually major and if so, how major. What percentage of the market do they serve, and what makret do they serve/service. And also into what models they each get and how they differ. etc.

 

But basically, while reporting what you said is good info to take note of. Unless I have a research paper on questions like this that I am asking AND more with analyzation. I won't and can't take any of it to be of any truth that I should note.

Ok let me break it down into layman terms as I have first hand experience here.

 

All companies order, have the same parts, quantity varies but there are only little over a dozen big brand pc manufacturers out there not 50 or 100 so breaking down raw data from a database into understandable statistics is not hard, like any other computer retailer globally around the world. I'm not getting what you mean by differ from retail models, all computer stores are retailers for pc components, you don't walk into JB Hi Fi or a Food Store outlet/retailer and buy pc components, peripherals yes but not components and hardware, so I'm not sure where you're getting at with what you've said.

 

How are we supposed to know know how G.Skill or manufacturers produce and stock there own parts before dispatched globally to distributor retailers so again not sure where you're going with this point as you're not making sense. The major suppliers that intercept all orders from overseas Taiwan, Costa Rica, USA, Europe, other parts of Asia all get stored into warehouses, like every other supplier does, there is no such thing as sub-optimal rooms or containers. Orders are stocked in tens of thousands quantities on shelves, pallets and regular rooms to break what components are what; into there own group classification in big warehouses. These are then distributed to all States in Australia, where registered computer retailers have placed orders. This then gets sold through the supply line to customers i.e us.

 

All parts have 2 S/N's, the manufacturers serial/part code number (global) and the countries supplier serial/part code number that is only recognized in information systems within Australia. All components are fabricated the same method and way from the manufacturers, components are not diversified according to what country it is going to or catered to a particular sub-group, no that would just make a clusterfk of a system for both suppliers and manufacturers. These serial/part code numbers are important for a number of reasons and one of them is mainly warranty. Computer parts and components are not like food, as long as they are left on the shelf, untouched in proper environmental and ambient conditions they will work regardless unless DOA. 

 

Your last two paragraphs don't make sense and some parts partially answered by the above.

 

Quote:
 Everything else you said was irrelevant or was based on perception and other stuff. But even this doesn't have much base in it.

 

This is by far the most stupid post I've read all morning. When users post there bad experience with X product on forums be it bad warranty delays or dodgy RMA replacements that is not opinion that is a single fact, it is established evidence. Forums such as HardOCP, Anandtech, EVGA, Asus, Gigabyte, TomsHardware, Intel, JohnnyGuru and etc have manufacturer customer and service representatives on there, when a large amount of user's make threads over x period of time (doesn't have to be consecutive) on x product dealing with faults or poor after-sales services, those representatives intervene and step in to to clarify any problems and take it up in PM with the affected users, I've been following all these major forums for over a decade (some less) with what happens. When problems and reported faults get out of hand the manufacturer will see this and most of this will be from forum feedback as well big public reviewers and said faults and problems will be treated. Calling out other peoples observation on factual written evidence of said problems posted by other users on a large scale is not perception, you might want to look up the dictionary of what perception is defined as. 

 

A similar situation happened to Philips nearly 10 years ago. Philips use to be an awesome manufacturer regarding CD transports/mechanisms and IC's for audio and video. They hit rock bottom when the failure rate of there first DVD player came out to up until 2005 100 fold eventually Philips had to announce that they will not be making there own IC's anymore for CD mechanisms and transport, decoder boards etc. This hurt there revenue and shares greatly and they deserved it because they cut off support to everybody out there and shoved the problem behind like it was nothing. Just google Philips SACD1000 problems and you will find out the rest of the story, unfortunately for the other big companies such as Classe and Musical Fidelity whom also used Philips decoder boards for DVD transport, Philips is nothing nowadays and what happened in the past hurt there reputation and revenue sales greatly on a worldwide scale.


Edited by DefQon - 2/2/14 at 6:12pm
post #4478 of 6201
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 

But basically, while reporting what you said is good info to take note of. Unless I have a research paper on questions like this that I am asking AND more with analyzation. I won't and can't take any of it to be of any truth that I should note.

 

Panda, it shouldn't be surprising that a lot of binning goes on with PC components, and one does have to wonder why some products and brands are cheaper than the others. Is it really unbelievable that some brands fail more than others?

 

You aren't going to find a written source on this stuff, because not only will manufacturers not release their statistics, but the publication of the statistics from a PC enthusiast site would be suicidal. The best you'll probably find would be return rates at a retail store, but even that is hard to come by.

post #4479 of 6201
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadlylover View Post
 

 

Panda, it shouldn't be surprising that a lot of binning goes on with PC components, and one does have to wonder why some products and brands are cheaper than the others. Is it really unbelievable that some brands fail more than others?

 

You aren't going to find a written source on this stuff, because not only will manufacturers not release their statistics, but the publication of the statistics from a PC enthusiast site would be suicidal. The best you'll probably find would be return rates at a retail store, but even that is hard to come by.

 

Exactly, return rates at a retail store also don't say crap on the surface unless you look at the reason and variables at play, i.e novice computer user enthusiastically buys motherboard and non QVL ram for that board, customer makes complaint and blatantly dismisses both as faulty and takes it back to store. Stops here but the usual approach is the tech's will test it in store and will come to a verdict but I've seen this not happen, some retailers will just replace it without testing, not knowing the mistake on customers behalf and the component is working fine. Other times is customer damages the components themselves and dismiss it as DOA. My statistics and observations are not 100% accurate and it is impossible unless you went to every store yourself around the world or a country and took there warranty/repair claims and documented it yourself after crunching down the data. But from what I've seen have had 1st hand experience puts me in the position to ok X product has poor reliability. What and however you want to take in that information is your own but I'm backed up heavily by raw data and major online reviewers who have had the same problems. A publication of statistics from a PC enthusiast site or any individual will bring the industry down to it's knees. That would be no different to Intel giving white press papers on the Broadwell design sharing ideas with AMD it will have a detrimental affect to everyone especially OEM's.


Edited by DefQon - 2/2/14 at 6:42pm
post #4480 of 6201
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

What is its main purpose.

I read your initial post with Adobe and all that, but I couldn't make sense of what you were trying to do with it. This is the PC Enthusiast fi thread so we always think Gaming.

Drop me what you want to use it for. Various uses etc

I'm using it for gaming and general use as well as some animating here and there. Probably also for some school reports and all that stuff. I didn't say anything about Adobe at all, did I? If I did I don't remember.
post #4481 of 6201
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

Ok let me break it down into layman terms as I have first hand experience here.

 

All companies order, have the same parts, quantity varies but there are only little over a dozen big brand pc manufacturers out there not 50 or 100 so breaking down raw data from a database into understandable statistics is not hard, like any other computer retailer globally around the world. I'm not getting what you mean by differ from retail models, all computer stores are retailers for pc components, you don't walk into JB Hi Fi or a Food Store outlet/retailer and buy pc components, peripherals yes but not components and hardware, so I'm not sure where you're getting at with what you've said.

 

How are we supposed to know know how G.Skill or manufacturers produce and stock there own parts before dispatched globally to distributor retailers so again not sure where you're going with this point as you're not making sense. The major suppliers that intercept all orders from overseas Taiwan, Costa Rica, USA, Europe, other parts of Asia all get stored into warehouses, like every other supplier does, there is no such thing as sub-optimal rooms or containers. Orders are stocked in tens of thousands quantities on shelves, pallets and regular rooms to break what components are what; into there own group classification in big warehouses. These are then distributed to all States in Australia, where registered computer retailers have placed orders. This then gets sold through the supply line to customers i.e us.

 

All parts have 2 S/N's, the manufacturers serial/part code number (global) and the countries supplier serial/part code number that is only recognized in information systems within Australia. All components are fabricated the same method and way from the manufacturers, components are not diversified according to what country it is going to or catered to a particular sub-group, no that would just make a clusterfk of a system for both suppliers and manufacturers. These serial/part code numbers are important for a number of reasons and one of them is mainly warranty. Computer parts and components are not like food, as long as they are left on the shelf, untouched in proper environmental and ambient conditions they will work regardless unless DOA. 

 

Your last two paragraphs don't make sense and some parts partially answered by the above.

 

 

This is by far the most stupid post I've read all morning. When users post there bad experience with X product on forums be it bad warranty delays or dodgy RMA replacements that is not opinion that is a single fact, it is established evidence. Forums such as HardOCP, Anandtech, EVGA, Asus, Gigabyte, TomsHardware, Intel, JohnnyGuru and etc have manufacturer customer and service representatives on there, when a large amount of user's make threads over x period of time (doesn't have to be consecutive) on x product dealing with faults or poor after-sales services, those representatives intervene and step in to to clarify any problems and take it up in PM with the affected users, I've been following all these major forums for over a decade (some less) with what happens. When problems and reported faults get out of hand the manufacturer will see this and most of this will be from forum feedback as well big public reviewers and said faults and problems will be treated. Calling out other peoples observation on factual written evidence of said problems posted by other users on a large scale is not perception, you might want to look up the dictionary of what perception is defined as. 

 

A similar situation happened to Philips nearly 10 years ago. Philips use to be an awesome manufacturer regarding CD transports/mechanisms and IC's for audio and video. They hit rock bottom when the failure rate of there first DVD player came out to up until 2005 100 fold eventually Philips had to announce that they will not be making there own IC's anymore for CD mechanisms and transport, decoder boards etc. This hurt there revenue and shares greatly and they deserved it because they cut off support to everybody out there and shoved the problem behind like it was nothing. Just google Philips SACD1000 problems and you will find out the rest of the story, unfortunately for the other big companies such as Classe and Musical Fidelity whom also used Philips decoder boards for DVD transport, Philips is nothing nowadays and what happened in the past hurt there reputation and revenue sales greatly on a worldwide scale.

When I say different parts. I'm talking about possible variants of a model or series. Retail class, professional class etc.

 

You aren't supposed to know. That is why there is so much to factor into these numbers. Because its impossible to really know the entire step. The sub optimal room example was quite a schitty example on my part, just an example.

 

How do you know G Skill etc doesn't reclassify stuff? That was just one of those examples of factors that one may not ever know of. 

 

I should rephrase and reword what I meant by perception. When a few people complain, that is perception and not enough 'data' to know if its a true problem. Look at the current FiiO threads after the product has been out for 6 months. Almost every new post on there is someone with a problem. But does that mean that the unit has an issue? Not really it just means that since the product has been out and nobody needs the 'product thread' anymore that people will just post their problems there. That doesn't signify a problem. 

But when its a clusterf**** of users that complain, then obviously that is the real issue then.

 

I don't think you are getting what it is I was getting at. What I was getting at was basically in exhausting all the variables that Gskill or any other manufactuer does or gets that may produce numbers that you are seeing that may or may not produce any real idea of failure rate. Obviously like you say, its hard to tell. Which is what I was getting at. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by deadlylover View Post
 

 

Panda, it shouldn't be surprising that a lot of binning goes on with PC components, and one does have to wonder why some products and brands are cheaper than the others. Is it really unbelievable that some brands fail more than others?

 

You aren't going to find a written source on this stuff, because not only will manufacturers not release their statistics, but the publication of the statistics from a PC enthusiast site would be suicidal. The best you'll probably find would be return rates at a retail store, but even that is hard to come by.

It isn't the unbeliveable part. I was just breaking down his post in terms of exhausting all the little possibilities that were no mentioned as to why the numbers of failure rates are as such. Since they weren't included, one can't just assume X Y Z

 

Obviously there will almost never be a written source of this stuff. It would be uber long and hard to get information.

 

This of course plays into why all research like this can't be 100% correct. 

 

I'm just mearley pointing out reasons for and why sometimes numbers and perception is incorrect. 

post #4482 of 6201

Ffs I need a bigger monitor to break down big posts. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 

When I say different parts. I'm talking about possible variants of a model or series. Retail class, professional class etc.

Retail class, professional class? Ermm what the heck are you on about? There are no possible variants of a model or series, it is a concrete, stabilized product announced and sold when the manufacturer see's fit, when your nearest Microcenter or Newegg stocks the parts list. If you're referring to a sub-group of a model number such as a GTX780 graphics card, you have the OC version from EVGA, the SuperOC from Gigabyte, DirectCU II from Asus, Hydro Edition from EVGA? I already pointed it out in my post 2 above deadly's, the early G.Skill DDR3 RipJaw's prior to Sandy Bridge era and the entire OCZ Vertex 1, 2, Plus and possibly more lineup that used the early Indilinx chipset, until 2 years ago they made the move to Sandforce realizing the faults and SSD's dying randomly was completely out of the norm and this only lead to a manufacturing problem.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

You aren't supposed to know. That is why there is so much to factor into these numbers. Because its impossible to really know the entire step. The sub optimal room example was quite a schitty example on my part, just an example.

All manufacturers are supposed to check, inspect and verify that all components test and function well before leaving the production factory, there are certified patents that specify this as a requisite, unless you work in the factory where the stuff is being made, you won't know and that is not the point, the point is from a supplier/customer relations perspective not what happens in that manufacturing plant. when official announcements are made for changes to be made due to faults, defects and piss poor production strategies that is not related to piss poor management and handling by employees working in the factory or suppliers and couriers making transit deliveries across inter-state of a country, that is a design and manufacturing defect from the engineers level.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
How do you know G Skill etc doesn't reclassify stuff? That was just one of those examples of factors that one may not ever know of. 

 

Why the heck would they re-classify stuff differently pre-manufacturing to post manufacturing then to final retail and marketing? So they and other manufacturers could pull wool over all our eyes and falsify and mislead reviewers, NDA contract holders, legal and patent holders, distributed suppliers and users? That is just plain stupid. No manufacturer would sell prototype's  and mix it in with there final product stock, nor has it been reported, that would make the biggest news headline if some manufacturer did in computing history.

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

I should rephrase and reword what I meant by perception. When a few people complain, that is perception and not enough 'data' to know if its a true problem. Look at the current FiiO threads after the product has been out for 6 months. Almost every new post on there is someone with a problem. But does that mean that the unit has an issue? Not really it just means that since the product has been out and nobody needs the 'product thread' anymore that people will just post their problems there. That doesn't signify a problem. 

But when its a clusterf**** of users that complain, then obviously that is the real issue then.

And exactly how many FiiO products get/has been sold worldwide since the company was founded? Not even 2% of the yearly sales pitch of ECS or ASRock let alone touching bigger and broader companies such as powerhouse brands Asus and Gigabyte or EVGA. Completely apples and bananas comparison. How many FiiO products gets shipped out of factory yearly? How many millions of just one model of motherboards get's shipped out from ECS? Out of bounds comparison dude and poor use of a perception example. Oh wait don't forget we haven't even counted in the OEM and Enterprise/Server grade sector.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 

I don't think you are getting what it is I was getting at. What I was getting at was basically in exhausting all the variables that Gskill or any other manufactuer does or gets that may produce numbers that you are seeing that may or may not produce any real idea of failure rate. Obviously like you say, its hard to tell. Which is what I was getting at.

 

No I think you're not getting what I'm saying with poor use of examples and poor justification on behalf of your arguments. You can't exhaust variables that one company has, what the available product from a manufacturer is, is what is being sold, no BUT's and no OR's. If a company was releasing unknown models into the wild without anybody else knowing it then the company is not doing itself a favor of staying alive in the market it is competing in. You can't ever have an exact number but a large statistical pool of data can 99% confirm what it is at now. Heck when you have official announcements from the horses mouth, those have an immediate upfront importance over any other statement or number made based on analysis by any one other than the manufacturer itself.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post

 

Obviously there will almost never be a written source of this stuff. It would be uber long and hard to get information.

No because it is illegal.

 

I'm done with this argument, its pointless and get's the thread topic nowhere.


Edited by DefQon - 2/2/14 at 7:23pm
post #4483 of 6201
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

Retail class, professional class? Ermm what the heck are you on about? There are no possible variants of a model or series, it is a concrete, stabilized product announced and sold when the manufacturer see's fit, when your nearest Microcenter or Newegg stocks the parts list. If you're referring to a sub-group of a model number such as a GTX780 graphics card, you have the OC version from EVGA, the SuperOC from Gigabyte, DirectCU II from Asus, Hydro Edition from EVGA? I already pointed it out in my post 2 above deadly's, the early G.Skill DDR3 RipJaw's prior to Sandy Bridge era and the entire OCZ Vertex 1, 2, Plus and possibly more lineup that used the early Indilinx chipset, until 2 years ago they made the move to Sandforce realizing the faults and SSD's dying randomly was completely out of the norm and this only lead to a manufacturing problem.

 

 

All manufacturers are supposed to check, inspect and verify that all components test and function well before leaving the production factory, there are certified patents that specify this as a requisite, unless you work in the factory where the stuff is being made, you won't know and that is not the point, the point is from a supplier/customer relations perspective not what happens in that manufacturing plant. when official announcements are made for changes to be made due to faults, defects and piss poor production strategies that is not related to piss poor management and handling by employees working in the factory or suppliers and couriers making transit deliveries across inter-state of a country, that is a design and manufacturing defect from the engineers level.

 

 

Why the heck would they re-classify stuff differently pre-manufacturing to post manufacturing then to final retail and marketing? So they and other manufacturers could pull wool over all our eyes and falsify and mislead reviewers, NDA contract holders, legal and patent holders, distributed suppliers and users? That is just plain stupid. No manufacturer would sell prototype's  and mix it in with there final product stock, nor has it been reported, that would make the biggest news headline if some manufacturer did in computing history.

 

 

 

And exactly how many FiiO products get/has been sold worldwide since the company was founded? Not even 2% of the yearly sales pitch of ECS or ASRock let alone touching bigger and broader companies such as powerhouse brands Asus and Gigabyte or EVGA. Completely apples and bananas comparison. How many FiiO products gets shipped out of factory yearly? How many millions of just one model of motherboards get's shipped out from ECS? Out of bounds comparison dude and poor use of a perception example. Oh wait don't forget we haven't even counted in the OEM and Enterprise/Server grade sector.

 

 

No I think you're not getting what I'm saying with poor use of examples and poor justification on behalf of your arguments. You can't exhaust variables that one company has, what the available product from a manufacturer is, is what is being sold, no BUT's and no OR's. If a company was releasing unknown models into the wild without anybody else knowing it then the company is not doing itself a favor of staying alive in the market it is competing in. You can't ever have an exact number but a large statistical pool of data can 99% confirm what it is at now. Heck when you have official announcements from horses mouth, those have an upfront important over any other statement or number made based on analysis.

 

 

No because it is illegal.

 

 

I don't suppose you get what I am referring to yet. I'm just throwing out terms here not as concrete terms but as one of the possibilites.

 

Take this post for example:

http://blog.backblaze.com/2014/01/21/what-hard-drive-should-i-buy/

 

This is quite a famous blog post by a company that was reposted by many tech sites. Many commenters didn't read it.

 

If you were to look you will see that Seagate fails hard. 

 

But the thing is, and as the company stated. The company only buys select Seagate hard drives. Thus this is not a full accurate ability of tell all of Seagate's drives. 

 

Apply this to a larger scale with possible variants to different countries or rebranding etc, and thus these numbers (as the article/blog) said are not accurate signs of how something performs. But of course, its nearly impossible to tell with 100% certainty how something will perform and its failure rate due to an infinite number of variables. 

 

We can thus, only get 'semi accurate' numbers on general performance like the kind that you are posting about. And that's fine, my post was rather on not being able to get an absolute 100% idea of failure rate. Hell, even a company's RMA or numbers drive may not be accurate to a certain level. As other variables play into it such as demographic and what people typically do. 

post #4484 of 6201
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowei006 View Post
 

 

I don't suppose you get what I am referring to yet. I'm just throwing out terms here not as concrete terms but as one of the possibilites.

 

Take this post for example:

http://blog.backblaze.com/2014/01/21/what-hard-drive-should-i-buy/

 

This is quite a famous blog post by a company that was reposted by many tech sites. Many commenters didn't read it.

 

If you were to look you will see that Seagate fails hard. 

 

But the thing is, and as the company stated. The company only buys select Seagate hard drives. Thus this is not a full accurate ability of tell all of Seagate's drives. 

 

Apply this to a larger scale with possible variants to different countries or rebranding etc, and thus these numbers (as the article/blog) said are not accurate signs of how something performs. But of course, its nearly impossible to tell with 100% certainty how something will perform and its failure rate due to an infinite number of variables. 

 

We can thus, only get 'semi accurate' numbers on general performance like the kind that you are posting about. And that's fine, my post was rather on not being able to get an absolute 100% idea of failure rate. Hell, even a company's RMA or numbers drive may not be accurate to a certain level. As other variables play into it such as demographic and what people typically do. 

 

There are no re-brands in the computing world, ever. A manufacturer can tailor a specific piece of hardware for an OEM (i.e RAID controllers and non consumer drivers such as Seagate SCSI and SAS drives) meeting there needs but these are not available to consumers so it's ruled out of the equation, let alone being shipped to different countries. 

 

Another thing I see massively wrong with that blog is as if they are continously forcing hard drives to work to a certain degree until it fails in there pod environment. This does not mimic the variable and daily usage regular users and consumers have when they turn on there computers. Also the faults I have stated with G.Skill and OCZ are IC fault related, conventional hard drives are mechanical and work by using moving parts, moving parts are always going to wear out faster (but it is arguable the IC's can fail faster due to random memory seek and load access but they have higher tolerance), it is still a different perspective of comparison between the two and shows no justification in your original point was that you were saying.


Edited by DefQon - 2/2/14 at 7:41pm
post #4485 of 6201
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

 

There are no re-brands in the computing world, ever. A manufacturer can tailor a specific piece of hardware for an OEM (i.e RAID controllers and non consumer drivers such as Seagate SCSI and SAS drives) meeting there needs but these are not available to consumers so it's ruled out of the equation, let alone being shipped to different countries. 

 

Another thing I see massively wrong with that blog is as if they are continously forcing hard drives to work to a certain degree until it fails in there pod environment. This does not mimic the variable and daily usage regular users and consumers have when they turn on there computers. Also the faults I have stated with G.Skill and OCZ are IC fault related, conventional hard drives are mechanical and work by using moving parts, moving parts are always going to wear out faster (but it is arguable the IC's can fail faster due to random memory seek and load access but they have higher tolerance), it is still a different perspective of comparison between the two and shows no justification in your original point was that you were saying.

And the fight continues!

 

Anyways, I guess it depends on what you count as a rebrand. Basically all of Corsair's PSUs are rebrands of power supplies from their respective OEM (Seasonic and a one or two other companies IIRC). I guess you could also say the same for RAM (since they usually use chips from other companies).

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