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post #781 of 21760

Although English is generally backwards in comparison to most other languages.
 

post #782 of 21760

English people were clever and they got rid of numerous endings in verbs, nouns etc. If you compare an English and the same Russian book, the latter is much fatter. 

post #783 of 21760

They were clever at making things more complicating and excessive. ;)
 

post #784 of 21760
In a large number of SF stories, English is not the universal human language. It's usually either the generic "galactic standard" or some sort of Chinese-English hybrid.
post #785 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

They were clever at making things more complicating and excessive. ;)
 

 

Why? I find English to be very organised and logical with a rigid structure. Ah, and they ( English people) in the old days got rid of numerous endings in verbs, nouns etc. which was a brave move. It's like Steve Jobs of linguistics was alive those days.


Edited by mutabor - 9/18/12 at 4:04pm
post #786 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post

 

Why? I find English to be very organised and logical with a rigid structure.

 

The syntax is fairly straightforward, but it's the exceptions that really irk me:

 

 

400877_274679749307180_1926454811_n.jpg

 

 

WhyEnglishIsHardToLearn-39689.jpeg

post #787 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by eke2k6 View Post

 

The syntax is fairly straightforward, but it's the exceptions that really irk me:

 

 

 

It's just that you probably don't know other languages. They also have big lists of exceptions. There are always exceptions for every rule.


Edited by mutabor - 9/18/12 at 4:13pm
post #788 of 21760
post #789 of 21760
I am a typical ignorant single-language person. My 2 years of high school German allows me to count to 20 and say the two most useful phrases in any language: "Ein Bier bitte" and "Wo ist die Toilette?"
post #790 of 21760

Also the structure differs from many languages. Like in Spanish " Mi hermano Jaime es un muchacho bajo" which literally translates to "My brother James is a boy short" in English. While in English the adjective comes before the noun (My brother James is a short boy." But when you really think about it it does make more sense to introduce the noun first since it is more significant to knowing what you are talking about in the sentence. :) I also like how Spanish incorporates the upside down question mark which tells you immediately if the sentence is a question or not.
 


Edited by lee730 - 9/18/12 at 4:24pm
post #791 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee730 View Post

Also the structure differs from many languages. Like in Spanish " Mi hermano Jaime es un muchacho bajo" which literally translates to "My brother James is a boy short". While in English the adjective comes before the noun (My brother James is a short boy." But when you really think about it it does make more sense to introduce the noun first since it is more significant to knowing what you are talking about in the sentence. :) I also like how Spanish incorporates the upside down question mark which tells you immediately if the sentence is a question or not.
 

 

It feels natural for me that an adjective stands before the noun it describes. Though in Russian the word order is more flexible than in English. For example, you can say "Several strangers passed me" or you can say "Passed me several strangers". Both variants are fine.


Edited by mutabor - 9/18/12 at 4:35pm
post #792 of 21760
I have a friend of mine from India that always says things like: "I saw an accident on the highway today morning." That always sounds strange to me - I know exactly what he means, but I would never say it that way.
post #793 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardgedee View Post

It's an easy thing to mock at but fundamentally it's the behavior of a country that does not have a tradition of aggressively assimilating foreign terms and expressions. English speakers take a lot of pleasure in the diversity of linguistic roots and have the attitude that whatever satisfies the need is a suitable word. Other countries are more defensive about their languages and linguistic purity, and it's different -- maybe more awkward -- but doesn't strike me as wrong. After all, the delegation in the story seem fully resigned to their job being an advisory one, producing words the public might or might not latch on to -- and some words do.

 

That's pretty much what I was mocking in the first place.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by maverickronin View Post

It always struck me as clannish and tribal.

 

Its one thing to be proud of your language and culture but the French Academy is essentially a mental border patrol that makes sure memes have go through the "proper channels" and become "naturalized".  They 're actively working to impede communication with other cultures which isn't usually a very successful or productive strategy.  Of course given the scale they operate on they're mostly harmless, which is why I only mock them.  I think they mostly deserve mockery not because of what they actually do but because of what the existence of such an organization represents.  At best it's isolationism, somewhere in the middle it's us-vs-them tribalism, and taken to the extreme it's almost Newspeak.

post #794 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I have a friend of mine from India that always says things like: "I saw an accident on the highway today morning." That always sounds strange to me - I know exactly what he means, but I would never say it that way.


Well if he just adds "this" then he's fine ;).

post #795 of 21760
Quote:
Originally Posted by eke2k6 View Post

The syntax is fairly straightforward, but it's the exceptions that really irk me:

 

400877_274679749307180_1926454811_n.jpg

 

 

WhyEnglishIsHardToLearn-39689.jpeg

 

Those are our Shibboleths.


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